Upcoming Shows

  • October 22, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 23, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 23, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 24, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 24, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 24, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 24, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 24, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 24, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 25, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Heliun
  • October 25, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 25, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 25, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 25, 2014 9:00 pmComedy Train Rek presents Awkward Sex and the City
  • October 25, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 25, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 25, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • October 29, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 30, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 30, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 31, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 31, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
AEC v1.0.4

Photos from Your News Philly, Guilty Pleasures and TV Party

Dan Vetrano warms up the crowd, getting big laughs for being a fan of "old" Miley Cyrus.

Dan Vetrano warms up the crowd, getting big laughs for being a fan of “old” Miley Cyrus.

Dave Metter and Allison Allison (Jacquie Baker) host YNP.

Dave Metter and Allison Allison (Jacquie Baker) host YNP.

Katilin Thompson YNP

Consumer critic Barb Bootsnider (Katlin Thompson) gives bad products The Boot!

Consumer critic Barb Bootsnider (Katlin Thompson) gives bad products The Boot!

But the critical lifestyle has caught up with her, and she decides to give herself the boot [not pictured because of photographer laughing too hard.]

Alexa & Darren (Martha Cooney and Chris Calletta) give a point/counterpoint debate on whether or not to give John Mayer a try.

Alexa & Darren (Martha Cooney and Chris Calletta) give a point/counterpoint debate on whether or not to give John Mayer a try.

Production assistant Colin Armstrong (Dan Corkery) suffers an existential crises as his chewing gum fails to stay in its package.

Production assistant Colin Armstrong (Dan Corkery) suffers an existential crises as his chewing gum fails to stay in its package.

Joe Moore (far left) and Roger Snair (far right) with a panel of improvisers (from left to right Steve Swan, Alex Newman, Aubrie Williams and Kaitlin Thompson) tribute the winter games by reading actual advice from Ask.com in Russian accents.

Joe Moore (far left) and Roger Snair (far right) with a panel of improvisers (from left to right: Steve Swan, Alex Newman, Aubrie Williams and Kaitlin Thompson) tribute the winter games by reading actual advice from Ask.com in Russian accents.

Roger ends the show with his important hip-hop message.

Roger closes the show with his important hip-hop message.

Paul Triggiani (left) and Rob Baniewicz (right) kick off the first TV Party in the theater space.

Paul Triggiani (left) and Rob Baniewicz (right) kick off the first TV Party in the theater space.

A theater full of comedians 'celebrates' the hilariously bad post-apocalyptic TV experiment from 1992 called Whoops.

A theater full of comedians ‘celebrates’ the hilariously bad post-apocalyptic TV experiment from 1992 called Whoops.

We also toasted this failed attempt at a sitcom version of Ferris Bueler’s Day Off from 1990:

Your News, Philadelphia w/ Dave Metter Thursday & Friday @ PHIT

dave metterWho needs news? You need news? Then “Your News, Philadelphia” has you covered. This fully scripted half hour news program complete with anchors and correspondents, the show runs along the vein of similar programs such as Onion News Network. Started by Philadelphia writer and comedian Dave Metter, he plays one of program’s anchors also conveniently named “Dave Metter.” Described as a newsman who is now in the twilight of his career and seems to be phoning it in at the very least, Dave is placed alongside a young go-getter with a bit of a grating personality anchor “Allison Allison,” who is played by Jacquie Baker.

What originally started as an idea for a short web series, a “pilot” episode of YNP (Your News, Philadelphia) originally premiered during a run of PHIT’s “Sweeps Week” last May; it’s now in its third run the show has found a home at the Shubin Theate. While he focuses mainly on writing, Metter does have a few long term projects in the works and if you’re a local footwear aficionado you may even recognize him as the creator of “Soup Boots.”

Dave also writes his own monthly column on Free For All Comedy titled “It’s Elementary!” where he asks fellow comics to share grade school-era memories that may or may not have helped influence their potential comedic sensibilities at a young age. Metter credits shows such as the BBC’s “The Day Today” as one of his own early influences, in addition to Steve Martin, and his Uncle Tim. You can catch him and the rest of “Your News, Philadelphia” Thursday December 5th at 7:30 PM and Friday December 6th at 8:30 PM, both at the Shubin Theatre (407 Bainbridge Street, Philadelphia, PA 19147.) For tickets, visit www.PhillyImprovTheater.com.

You can also follow Dave on Twitter @DaveMetter.

It’s Elementary with Dave Metter: Paul Triggiani

“It’s Elementary” is a monthly column every first Wednesday that asks comedians to share funny memories from their elementary school years, or “periods” (get it?? Like moments in time, but also like in school!) from those formative years that have informed their personal and comedic identities. Or, they’ll just submit some random anecdotes. Whatever they want, really.

by Dave Metter

I have long been fascinated by what has influenced and inspired other comedy writers, especially during their youths when their comedic senses were still so nascent and less judgmental.  This month features writer/director/performer/tech man/backslash abuser Paul Triggiani.

 

Dave has kindly asked me to write about my time in elementary school for this installment of “It’s Elementary.” So, yes, I’d love to tell you about one of the darkest, most repulsive periods of my life that isn’t right now.

1st Period: The Move
When I was in third grade, my parents moved my brother and I from a private, progressive school that we had been in since kindergarten to a public school. It was the hardest, least pleasant time in my life. I’ve never spent any significant time in prison, but it was probably a lot like that (adjusted for scale of life experience and emotional preparedness).

2nd Period: From Apple Orchard-come-Commune School
The school we had up and to that point spent our entire lives at was an apple orchard-come-commune. The inhabitants of that commune didn’t want to go out and find square jobs so they just said, “Fuck it, let’s be a school.” I remember once asking a teacher how the Native Americans came to be in North America, and she just stared into the ceiling and said, “Nobody knows.” It was a really nurturing place to grow and find your emotional center, but by the time we transferred to public school in third grade, I didn’t know how to read or tie my own shoes.

3rd Period: To Public School
The next year, I transferred to public school and was immediately met with a series of sobering truths—1) the rest of the world had a shared popular culture, it extended beyond 1974, and everyone knew about it but me 2) this was not a warm and inviting place where my ideas and opinions would be welcomed by everyone; to the contrary, every word I said and every thought I decided to share would be judged and used against me by some juvenile scumbag and 3) the other students were sometimes just as bad. It was an emotionally rocky time for me, and I spent a lot of time rolling around on the ground with a jacket over my head. Not sure why.

4th Period: Kids Corner
I can’t remember much about grade school that was positive, except for Kids Corner. If you’re from the area, it’s possible that you’re familiar with the long-running children’s call-in show hosted by Kathy O’Connell and produced by Robert Drake. If you listen to the show today, you’ll hear a lot of music specifically geared toward children, but in the late eighties and early nineties, it was a very different show. From what I could tell, they had maybe ten records that they cycled through—two Dr. Demento collections, a bunch of “Weird Al” Yankovic, They Might Be Giants’ Flood and The Dead Milkmen’s Beelzebubba. So this is how I managed to be exposed to almost nothing but novelty music for the better part of a decade.

5th Period: A Weirdo Unchained
But there was also an underlying message to Kids Corner, and one that I didn’t fully recognize until I was in my late teens. It came through the music they played, but also through the guests that they chose to feature—artists, musicians, nerds of every variety. The novelty music that I was exposed to through the show helped to shape my interest in comedy and show me where my sensibilities were, but the part of Kids Corner that had the biggest impact was that they managed to say “It’s okay to be a little weird. There are weird people everywhere, and they’re doing great” at a time when I needed it most.

Dave Metter is a comedy writer, and member of sketch comedy collective Iron Potato. See Dave’s show “Your News, Philadelphia!” at the Shubin Theater today, June 5th, in the finals of PHIT’s Variety Sweeps Week. Follow Dave on Twitter @DaveMetter.