Upcoming Shows

  • September 4, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 4, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • September 5, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • September 5, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • September 5, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • September 5, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 5, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 6, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • September 6, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • September 6, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • September 6, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • September 6, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • September 11, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 11, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • September 12, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • September 12, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • September 12, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • September 12, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 12, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 13, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • September 13, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • September 13, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • September 13, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • September 13, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • September 18, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
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Retro Philly Comedy — “Medowsteak” by Meg & Rob

 

Got any favorite Philly comedy videos from yester-year? Tweet them @WitOutDotNet

“A Dead Saint in an Altar” – Interview with Meg Favreau

Tomorrow night at Camp Woods Plus Meg & Rob will perform together for the first time in over a year. The sketch duo was a staple of the Philly comedy community for years until Meg Favreau moved to Los Angeles to further pursue a career in comedy. We asked Meg some questions about her time in LA, her return to Philadelphia, and her reunion with sketch partner Rob Baniewicz.

WITOUT: You’ve been in Los Angeles for a little over a year now, what do you miss most about Philly comedy, or have you forgotten about us completely?

MEG FAVREAU: I miss the sense of community the most. There’s definitely a great comedy community out here, and I’ve made a lot of friends through it. But because of the size of things, it’s a lot more splintered. I love how in Philly there is so much cross-pollination between stand up, sketch, and improv. Moreover, every time I went to a comedy show, I wasn’t just going to a show — I knew that almost no matter what the show was, I would walk in, and a bunch of my friends would be there.

I also think comedy in Philly tends to be more playful and experimental. I’ve seen a lot of great sketch since moving, but I’ve also seen so much samey sketch in LA. I think there are a few reasons — for one, a lot of people are trying to become part of existing teams and institutions, so they try to match that voice or style. And then, when they finally get on a team, it’s a bunch of people who (probably) haven’t worked together before, headed up by a director wrangling disparate voices. But I think stronger sketch often comes from what generally happens in Philly — when a group of friends decide to work together and just follow what makes them laugh the most in the way it makes them laugh the most.

To combine the two, I miss the hell out of Sketch Up or Shut Up. Not hosting it (although I did love that), but just getting to spend one night a month with a bunch of hilarious and supportive people trying things out.

WO: Tell us about the comedy projects you have going on in LA.

MF: I’m in a sketch group called Bone Mouth with fellow Philly ex-pat Alexis Simpson. It’s funny — I had moved out here so focused on meeting new people to do sketch with, and then I ended up forming a group with the person I’ve known the longest. I’m really happy with the stuff we’ve been doing. It’s super dark and absurd, and we have a great director, Brian James O’Connell, who really gets our sensibility.

I also just got cast onto a sketch team at the iO called DJ Faucet. We’ve only had a couple of meetings, but so far, it’s great — the director is really experienced and knows how to make a writers’ room feel really positive while still being critical and productive, and the other people on the team are pretty awesome too. I’m missing the first show while I’m in Philly, but I’m so stoked to write and perform with them more.

WO: How has being in LA for the past year affected your work as a comedian and writer?

MF: Overall, I think it’s made me a stronger writer and better at working with other people. I’ve had some really great experiences, and some really bad ones — for a little while, I was on a team that was just not the right fit for me, and the director wouldn’t put up a single sketch I wrote. It was really frustrating, but I came out of that surer of my own voice and the kind of work I want to do.

I’m also writing more long work — specs, and at the moment, a pilot — which is something I did a little in Philly, but always felt clueless about. I’d get halfway through a spec script and want to give up, convinced that my brain only understood short form work. But living in LA has made writing longer work feel both more necessary and more achievable, and I’m enjoying the process a lot more.

The biggest change, though, might be that I’ve moved from feeling like a career as a comedy writer is this amorphous “maybe that could happen” thing to a concrete, achievable goal. The path isn’t always obvious, but living here makes it seem very doable.

WO: How is the process of writing and working on a show when your partner is three thousand miles away?

MF: At this point, it’s actually not that different than when we lived close by. Shortly after Rob and I started working together, I switched jobs (we met when working together at QVC). We wrote almost all of our sketches at work, then emailed each other notes. Practicing will be another matter — there’s only about 24 hours between when I arrive in Philly and when this show goes up. And this is assuming that my flight isn’t delayed by East Coast Terror Storm 2012.

WO: Have you noticed a difference in Rob and his work since you’ve been gone. Do you think your absence has affected him in any ways (positively or negatively)?

MF: Well, shortly after I left, he was listening to the Pixies song “Cactus” a lot. You know, that one imploring the girl to get sweat and blood all over her dress and then send it to Frank Black. I would have sent Rob a dress, but he never offered to pay for it.

But I think that the split was hard for both of us. While we both did comedy in some form before Meg & Rob, so much of our development as writers and performers was together. It was scary to be let loose from that. The sketches I’ve read of his recently have been great though. Also, he has a wife now. I’m not saying that couldn’t have happened while I was there…but it did happen after I left.

WO: The November 1st Camp Woods Plus show will feature Meg & Rob, Secret Pants, and of course, Camp Woods — can you talk a little about what you think each of these groups brings to the table with their own brands of sketch comedy?

MF: Oh my goodness. I love both teams so much. When Rob and I started doing sketch, Secret Pants was already so strongly forged, and they’ve only gotten better. Well, I’ve been away for a year and a half, so maybe they’ve gotten worse in that amount of time. But I feel like with some groups, you see good writing hide shitty staging, or really wonderful staging hide shitty writing. Secret Pants writes smart, funny sketches and always has great acting and staging.

It’s been awesome to see Camp Woods become more and more of a super-group — they were already so good and different, and they’ve added some of my favorite comedians in the city. What I’ve seen from them recently has struck a really good balance between staying grounded and being batshit weird.

WO: What else are you looking forward to on your return trip to Philadelphia?

MF: Seeing friends and eating and drinking everything — especially 1,000 sandwiches from Paesano’s and real apple cider. Also, I’m going to do some touristy stuff I never got around to while I was living in Philly, primarily, seeing St. John Neumann. Did you know Philadelphia has a dead saint in an altar? How did I live there for six years and not go see that?!

Philly Comedy Round-up, Vol. 62

Due to the impending threat of Hurricane Sandy, all shows, classes, rehearsals and workshops scheduled for tonight (Monday, October 29th) and tomorrow (Tuesday, October 30th) at Philly Improv Theater have been cancelled. We will keep you posted with any further schedule changes from PHIT, or any other Philadelphia comedy venues as we receive news.

Comedian Doogie Horner has been named one of the Smartest People in Philadelphia by Philadelphia Magazine. They specifically mention his graphic design work and flowcharts which you can find online or in his book Everything Explained Through Flowcharts.

Last week, Rittenhouse Comedy at Noche came to an end, but those looking for a Tuesday night open mic won’t have to wait long. This week – The Tuesday Night Shitshow hosted by Steve Miller-Miller premieres at Underground Arts (1200 Callowhill St.)  Signups begin at 8:30 and the show starts at 9:00.

This Thursday, Camp Woods Plus returns to L’etage (624 S. 6th St.) for a special show featuring Secret Pants and the reunion of Meg & Rob. The show will mark the first show for the sketch duo since Meg Favreau moved to Los Angeles last year. Doors open at 8:00 and the show begins at 8:30.

Episode 8 of Patrick Dodd’s Comedy. Food. Sports. podcast is online and features comedian Jim Norton, who calls in to discuss his conversation with Muhammad Ali,  Rachel Ray’s hips, A-Rod and Romo never being clutch and much more. The episode is available online via iTunes.

Philly Comedy Round-Up, Vol. 55

Last week, James Hesky was crowned Philly’s Phunniest Person by Helium Comedy Club. We told you about it here (where you can watch his winning set from the finals). Now, you can read this interview with Hesky on CityPaper’s Critical Mass Blog. Enjoy.

Tomorrow night, Comedy Dreamz returns to The Barbary (951 Frankford Ave. Philadelphia) for a night of comedy featuring  Body Dreamz, Aaron Hertzog, Carolyn Busa, Steve Miller-Miller, The Feeko Brothers, Alejandro Morales and more! Doors open at 9pm, the show starts at 10, with a dance party following.

Wednesday, September 5th Corey Cohen Comedy Productions will host a stand-up show featuring Nick Turner (Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, King Temp) and Andy Hanes (Conan, Comedy Central) at The Urban Saloon (2120 Fairmount Ave. Philadelphia). More information can be found on facebook, and tickets for the event can be purchased online.

Mani Pedi will be hosting another ManiParty on Saturday, September 1 to help cover their travel costs to the upcoming Boston Comedy Arts Festival. Joining them on the show (at L’etage, 624 S. 6th St.) will be fellow BCAF performers Camp Woods and The Feeko Brothers.

Meg & Rob have announced a new show, dubbed “The Next Final Show” set for November 1, 2012. The first show from the duo since Meg Favreau moved to Los Angeles last year. Keep your eyes out for more details about this must see reunion show in the near future.

In meta-news, Collaborate Philly did an interview with us (more specifically, with editor Aaron Hertzog) about our website and the Philadelphia comedy scene. You can read all about us here.

 

 

The 2011 Witout Awards: Best Short Run Show

Friends of Alcatraz

This improvised puppet show made its’ run during the 2011 Philly Fringe Festival with a cast featuring Kelly Vrooman, Joe Sabatino, Jason Stockdale, Rob Cutler, and Dave Jadico. You can read reviews of the show from Philly Weekly, CityPaper, and from us here at Witout online.

PRO-Mania

The part improv/ part sketch homage to professional wrestling from the minds of Ian Vaflor and Alex Gross featured various performance from many of the best stand-ups, improvisers, and sketch comedians in Philadelphia. You can read a review from Citypaper online.

twenty-four

This improvised mono-scene made it’s original run during the Philly Fringe Festival and was directed by Steve Kleinedler with a cast featuring Emily Davis, Corin Wells, Becca Trabin, Mike Marbach, Marc Reber, Jessica Ross, Cait O’Driscoll and Bobbi Block. You can read a review from Witout online.

Quality Value Convenience: Meg & Rob’s Last Show

Before Meg Favreau bid adieu to Philadelphia she, along with longtime sketch partner Rob Baniewicz put together a run of shows at Philly Improv Theater featuring many of their favorite Philly comedy performers and some of their best sketches to date. We wrote about the first night of the show here.

Stage Fright: An Improvised Homage to Hitchcock

Featuring Alli Soowal, Jason Stockdale, Jessica Ross, Joe Sabatino, Kristin Finger, Mary Carpenter, Nathan Edmondson and Rob Cutler with direction and improvised score by Matt Nelson – Stage Fright is an improvised narrative in the vein of an Alfred Hitchcock movie. You can see one of the performances online.