Upcoming Shows

  • July 24, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • July 24, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • July 25, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • July 25, 2014 7:30 pmFirst Fridays w/ Interrobang
  • July 25, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • July 25, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • July 25, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • July 25, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • July 26, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • July 26, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • July 26, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • July 26, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • July 26, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • July 31, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • July 31, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • August 1, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • August 1, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • August 1, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • August 1, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • August 1, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • August 2, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • August 2, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • August 2, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • August 2, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • August 2, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
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Luke Giordano is back for one day to teach how to write for television!

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While we generally don’t plug classes as a matter of maintaining journalistic integrity (lol!), founding WitOut editor Luke Giordano has been kicking butt writing for Dreamworks and is back on Saturday (6/28)  to drop some wisdom nuggets about TV writing in 2014.

After a stint with Nickelodeon including writing episodes of their Marvin Marvin series, Giordano has signed on to Dreamworks writing for their exclusive content deal with Netflix. The details of his new show are still under wraps, but he says, “…it’s sort of an animated boy’s action comedy with lots of smashing things. Should be fun when it comes out.”

This will be Giordano’s third time teaching the class. He’ll cover everything from how to write an episode of television, what’s the process of a writer’s room, how to get an agent/representation, and basically everything else that goes into a career writing for TV.

The one-day seminar will be on Saturday from 11:00am – 2:30pm. To register for the class, visit Philly Improv Theater.

Philly Comedy Round-up, Vol. 86

Former Philly/current LA comedians Brendan Kennedy, Luke Giordano, and Mike Weinstein have started a new podcast, Remember Remember the Titans. The show says to be “the only podcast dedicated specifically to discussing the Disney high school football movie, Remember the Titans.” Actually, the guys tell stories, do bits, and have fun based on the topics, themes, and actors from the movie. In the first episode they are joined by former-former Philly comedian Aaron Hertzog.

Philly Improv Theater has announced the cast for their new Spring theatrical run, The Bat. The show runs from on Tuesday, April 30th through Sunday, May 19th. For a full schedule and tickets check the PHIT website show calendar or visit the TicketLeap page for the run.

This Tuesday Polygon Comedy returns to L’etage for their monthly variety show. This month, the show will feature stand-up from Christian Alsis, sketch from ManiPedi, musical improv from Interrobang, and music from Iliana Inocencio.

A Bunch of Improv at the Grape Room returns this Tuesday to The Grape Room in Manayunk.

The High Five Comedy Showcase debuts at Voltage this Wednesday. The show will be hosted by Jay West and will feature stand-up comedy from Aaron Hertzog, Dan Scully, Andre Johnson, Mikaela Hamje, and Joe Bell.

Stand-up/Improv show Comedian Deconstruction returns to L’etage this Thursday with a show featuring improv from Bed Savage and stand-up from Howard Algeo, Dave Temple, Geoff Jackson, Kerryn Feehan, and Frank Liotti.

The second round of Figment Theater’s Troika Tournament continues this Friday night at The Sideshow. The show will feature teams comprised of: Becca Trabin, Charles Rosen, Sean Landis; Alex Newman, Andrew Stanton, Nicole Labrecque; and Jim Burns, Maggy Keegan, Rachel Whitworth.

Something Witty at The Dive returns to the East Passyunk Ave. bar this Friday for a stand-up comedy showcase hosted by Alex Pearlman.

Tongue & Groove’s “That Time” will play this Saturday and Sunday at The Kimmel Center. The show will ask the audience “If you could go back in time to any moment in your own life’s story, where would you go and why?” to inspire “a collage of improvised theater, dance, and music.”

If you have any Philly comedy news worth mentioning – send it our way with an email to contact@witout.net

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 23

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Philly Comedy Round-up, Vol. 79

News:

In case you haven’t seen it – the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philly.com wrote this article on Philadelphia’s “burgeoning comedy scene.” Check it out for quotes from Todd Glass, Doogie Horner, BJ Ellis, and WitOut’s own Alison Zeidman.

Performer submissions are open now through Sunday, March 3 for the annual Troika tournament. Interested performers should email their name, contact information and list of current and past performance groups to troika@figmenttheater.org. Performers will be placed in groups of three and will have one month to come up with their group’s name and performance style. The tournament will be held at The Sideshow with preliminary rounds taking place on April 13, 19, and 26 with the championship round on Saturday, April 27.

Submissions are now open for High Note Humor’s South Jersey Stand-up Championship - which will be held at The Taproom Grill (427 W Crystal Lake Drive Haddonfield, NJ). Three comics from each preliminary round (April 4, 11, 18) will advance to the finals on April 26 for a chance to win cash prizes, future paid work, and a championship belt! Interested comedians can sign up by sending their name, comedy experience, and availability for the preliminary rounds to HighNoteHumor@gmail.com by the deadline of March 12.

Luke Giordano wrote this piece on the importance of failure for his site Everything You Like is Stupid. Luke has recently switched the format of the site from a humor page to one where he writes essays on his ideas, process, and other thoughts behind writing and comedy. As someone who also likes to think a lot about the process or writing and creating comedy I can say that it is worth checking out.

Due to a fire in the Valley Forge Beef and Ale, all shows at Chuckles Comedy Club have been put on hold. We will update you on any news about the venue as soon as more information is available.

Shows:

Philly Improv Theater will host the first of a two-week-run of shows at The Shubin Theater (407 Bainbridge St.) this week. You can see their full schedule online to check out all the improv, sketch, panel, and variety shows PHIT has to offer.

The Not Just Comedy Show returns to the Grape Room (105 Grape St. Manayunk) this Tuesday with a show featuring stand-up from Dan King, Tommy Highland, Darryl Charles, Danelle Lamar, Dan Mahon, Pat Kelly, and Dr. Tony; improv from Bed Savage; and music from Borrowed Instrument. Doors open at 7:30 and the show beings at 8:00.

Philly’s own Todd Glass will be headlining at Helium Comedy Club (2031 Sansom St.) this week with shows from Wednesday to Saturday. Also performing on the show will be comedians Chip Chantry and Blake Wexler.

This Wednesday Tight Six presents: Not Jazz 3 at Chris’ Jazz Cafe (1421 Sansom St.) This month’s show will feature comedy from John McKeever, Alex Pearlman, Omar Scruggs, Jon DelCollo, Caitlyn Feeney, Chris O’Conner, and promisses to have a secret special guest.

The Taproom Sports Bar & Grill (15 S Morton Ave  Morton, PA) will host their second Totally Free Comedy Night this Thursday with a show featuring performances from James Hesky, Tommy Pope, Darryl Charles, Chris Dolan, Jake Mattera, and Michael Brooks.

Mike Rainey will be hosting a party and comedy show to celebrate the release of his book Terrible Advice this Friday at The Arts Parlor (1170 S. Broad St.) The night will feature comedy from Sean Clay, Joe Mayo, James Hesky, Tim Butterly, Tommy Pope, and more! Mike will be selling and signing copies of his book for $10.

Sketch group Comic Energy will be performing a show this Friday at The Adrienne Theater (2030 Sansom St.) The group will put on two performances at 8:00 and 10:00, with a ticket price of $5 for any of their friends on Facebook.

This Sunday Eddie Brill Presents the Great American Comedy Audition Showcase at Helium Comedy Club. The show will be headlined by Brill and will feature performances from: Doogie Horner, Dave Terruso, Jim Ginty, Andy Nolan, Darryl Charles, Chip Chantry, Mary Radzinski, Roger Weaver, John McKeever, Pat Barker, Tommy Pope and James Hesky. Tickets can be purchased online.

If you have any Philly comedy news worth mentioning – send it our way with an email to contact@witout.net

Comedy Around the Web, Vol. 25

The story of the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater and their practice of not paying performers has continued to get coverage. This week the New York Times covered the issue with this article in which they talk to comedians Chris Gethard, Matt Besser, and Nick Turner.

Writer/Comedian/Former editor of WitOut Luke Giordano wrote this excellent piece on the tendency he (and other artists) have to compare themselves to their peers and the relationship between success and hard work for his website Everything You Like is Stupid.

The new David Cross comedy It’s a Disaster  has been released as a series of six-second clips via Vine as an experiment in social media marketing. The full film will be released through Video on Demand on March 5.

Anthony Jeselnik’s new Comedy Central show The Jeselnik Offensive, in which he and a panel of comedians joke about current events and pop culture topics, debuted this week. You can watch the first seven minutes of the episode online.

Comedian and Twitter darling Rob Delaney was featured on Jimmy Kimmel Live this week. First, in a segment called “Old People Read Rob Delaney’s Tweets” and later performing a stand-up set.

Splitsider put together this list of 57 books every comedy fan must read.

Watch New York-based stand-up comedian (and frequent Philly performer) Mark Normand make his late-night television debut on Conan.

If you have a free hour, you can watch Dan Harmon talk about himself and his process in creating Community at CommuniCon.

I won’t lie – I’m a little worried at how much I agree with Bro Bible’s list of “13 Hilarious Movies that Prove Our Review System is Broken”.

Andy Samberg talks on Conan about one of his favorite unaired SNL sketches.

 

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 15

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Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 7

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 4

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 2

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

So Amazing That It’s Actually Immoral: Interview with Luke Giordano

Luke Giordano is a writer and comedian living in Los Angeles, California. He used to live and perform comedy in Philadelphia, until a job as a writer on Two and a Half Men sent him west. He now works as a writer for the Nickelodeon show Marvin Marvin. He will be returning to Philly next weekend, where he will teach a workshop at Philly Improv Theater on Becoming a Television Comedy Staff Writer. We caught up with Luke to ask him some questions about the workshop, and his return to Philadelphia.

WITOUT: I’ve heard you’re mostly returning to Philadelphia so you can go to the Ruby Chinese Buffet, is this true?

LUKE GIORDANO: I am indeed excited to go Ruby Chinese Buffet, as are we all. But is it for the food or for the good times we shared there? I’m also excited for getting a Wawa hoagie. Even though there are better hoagies all around town, none will make me feel nostalgic for good old Philly like Wawa will. Plus, I’ve been trying to work out and eat decently for a while now, so it’ll be nice to have a weekend where I can eat like I hate myself again.

WO: Is the workshop going to focus more on the process of writing or the process of selling yourself as a writer?

LG: Originally, it was going to be more about the things you need to do to get a job that aren’t writing a script, but since I’ve been reading several scripts from Philly comedy people, I’ve noticed that a lot of the same problems come up. Structure is the biggest problem I’ve seen people have with writing a TV script. If you don’t know how to structure an episode of television properly, nobody who matters is going to read it. The workshop is really about arming yourself. Through a great script, through what you know, what you do to get noticed, how get an agent, what to expect in meetings, what people are looking for, and everything else. I don’t think you can teach someone how to be a good writer, but you can teach someone how to write more effectively. This workshop and seminar is really telling you everything I know about writing for television.

WO: Which of these have you found more difficult? Why?

LG: Writing is the fun part. It’s the part that makes everything worth it. To go in everyday and your job being that you get pitch jokes all day and laugh? It’s so amazing that it’s actually immoral. And on top of that, I get to make a comfortable living? It’s the best job in the world and it’s worth every ounce of struggle that you put into it. It’s worth going through all the shit and the disappointment and the rejection and the astronomical odds against you. If I didn’t get my first job when I was twenty-five, I would have gone another twenty years trying to get it. It’s a choice, really. Do you value comfort and stability or do you want to take a risk and do what you really want to do? Even though you probably won’t get it?

WO: You’ve done stand-up, improv, and sketch – how have each of these prepared you in different ways for your Hollywood writing jobs?

LG: I think all those skills go to the same place. It’s all a skill set you should develop anyway, and the more you develop that stuff, the stronger you’ll be. When you go into a meeting with a network executive, for example, you’re selling yourself — so they want a bit of a performance. You got in the room because they liked your script, so what the meeting is about is finding out if they like you and if you’re somebody they want to continue to work with. They want a little song and dance, but just as long as it doesn’t seem like you’re doing a song and dance. They can smell your desperation if it comes off that way, but the conquering of fear that comes with performing live comedy will help you to talk to these people and be funny and be yourself. The same goes for pitching jokes in the writers room. You have to sell the joke like you would on stage. You have to be behind this idea you’re putting forth to expect anyone to accept it. Performing comedy and telling jokes in front of an audience is only going to make you better at pitching a joke to a room of peers. On top of that, stand-up and sketch are only going to make your writing stronger because you’re learning how to construct jokes more effectively and efficiently. You’re writing to get a laugh and I think when you write specifically for the purpose of getting laughter, you learn to drop all the meandering bullshit. And improv is going to teach you how to think on your feet, but I think improv is all jokes, too. They’re just a little more disguised and between multiple people.

WO: How did your years as a Philadelphia comic prepare you for life as an LA writer/comedian?

LG: Most importantly, it taught me how to fail, how to deal with failure, and how to move through failure and learn from it. Failing is the single most important part of the creative process. It matures you, it makes you stronger. You can learn from your mistake, fix where you went wrong, learn your limitations, find out what’s funny and what isn’t. And when a point comes when you’re not afraid of failure (I’m in no way anywhere near this), I think you find freedom. I got fired from Two and a Half Men six weeks after I got the job. I didn’t know if I would ever work in writing again. And it was absolutely humiliating. People get fired from writing jobs for the most minuscule of reasons. Sometimes it doesn’t really have anything to do with them. They fire you because they can and because that’s the game you’re in. As I’ve learned since, every single writer in the business will get fired at some point. It’s about what you do after you get fired.

WO: We all know that LA is home to a lot of professional comedians, but how does the amateur LA comedy scene stack up to the Philadelphia comedy scene?

LG: Mostly it’s way bigger. There are a lot more people, a lot more shows, a lot more places to get up. I think you have to fully commit yourself to get noticed, even by other open micers. I haven’t gotten up as much as I would like to, so I still feel like I’m on the outside a bit. I certainly don’t think the comedians here are better qualitatively on average than they are in Philadelphia. But there is always the possibility that you’re doing a show and Patton Oswalt might walk in to do a set. It’s weird. I feel like people feel like there’s more at stake, because people come here to work and make it. So you do get a lot of people who just do stand-up to get famous or get a sitcom, in addition to the people who are actually doing it to be comedians. It’s a little strange to me. I don’t think I’ve deciphered it yet.

WO: What else are you looking forward to doing on your return trip to Philadelphia?

LG: Well, I sure am excited to perform a half hour of stand-up comedy at Philly Improv Theater! Mostly just eating awful food, seeing all my Friendship Buddies, singing karaoke, and hopefully running into people who I feel have wronged me.

 You can sign up for Luke’s workshop on Becoming a Television Comedy Writer online at Philly Improv Theater. His show with Aaron Hertzog will be Saturday, October 6th at 7PM at PHIT.