Upcoming Shows

  • October 22, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 23, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 23, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 24, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 24, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 24, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 24, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 24, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 24, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 25, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Heliun
  • October 25, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 25, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 25, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 25, 2014 9:00 pmComedy Train Rek presents Awkward Sex and the City
  • October 25, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 25, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 25, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • October 29, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 30, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 30, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 31, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 31, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
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Tweets of the Week, Vol. 14

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Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 12

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Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Stand-up Fashionista with Joe Moore: The Roast of Brendan Kennedy

Lots of people will be talking about the things that went down at last night’s roast of Brendan Kennedy. Brendan is leaving for LA soon, and the roast provided an opportunity for the Philadelphia comedy community to air out their dirty laundry live and on stage.

Speaking of laundry, below is a description of what everyone was wearing during the roast last night.

Benny Michaels – Black suit jacket over a white  and grey vertical-striped shirt unbuttoned at the top, a brown undershirt, black shoes
Rob Baniewicz – Red and white picnic blanket-style checkered shirt, black jacket, black jeans, black shoes
Alex Pearlman – Grey double-breasted cardigan with black buttons, purple dress shirt untucked with a black tie, blue jeans, black shoes
Jess Ross – Green dress, green beaded necklace, black leggings, black boots
Roger C Snair – Black pants, dark brown long-sleeve henley shirt, dark green/brown/light green wide-brimmed hat, black shoes
Shannon Brown – Black blouse, blue jeans, necklace with a locket, black shoes
Doogie Horner – Grey over-shirt with a black untucked T-shirt underneath with the words ‘THE DEAD MILKMEN” in white lettering and a white cartoon of a cow, light blue jeans, aquamarine shoes with white soles
Christian Alsis – Dark blue hoodie sweatshirt zipped three quarters of the way, blue and white checkered undershirt, white T-shirt just visible at the neckline, blue jeans, dark shoes
Michael Rainey – Black henley-style long-sleeved shirt, black jeans, brown shoes with no laces
Joey Dougherty – Red and black untucked checkered shirt, black jeans with cuffs, light brown leather shoes with darker brown laces
Greg Maughan – Blue, black and white plaid shirt, black khakis, black shoes, silver wrist watch on the left wrist
Jim Grammond – Three-quarter sleeve untucked ringer baseball T-shirt with red sleeves, grey chest and back, the words “RED FANG” in red blood-splatter-esque lettering above a white skull of a saber-toothed tiger, sleeves rolled about 2 inches, blue jeans, black shoes
Brian Craig – Blue and white plaid untucked shirt, sleeves rolled to the elbows, blue jeans, brown shoes
Brendan Kennedy – Dark blue jeans, blue button-down shirt (unbuttoned) over a navy blue henley style long-sleeve shirt with a grey T-shirt just visible at the collar, black jeans, black shoes

Joe Moore is a writer for PHIT House Sketch Team Dog Mountain and an online fashion guy.

Pizza Pals with Joe Moore featuring…Daring Daulton!

Everyone’s got a favorite spot to get pizza. But it’s important to always scope out the other pizza on your perimeter.  Went to a bar/restaurant about a week ago and had a really good pizza I never would have looked for, if I didn’t force myself to keep up-to-date on ALL THE PIZZA NEAR ME….

Speaking of up-to-date, I had pizza recently met up with two-dates at once: Joe Paolucci and Trevor Cunnion, who form Sketch Group Daring Daulton. Daring Daulton will ALSO be performing at the FINAL CAMP WOODS PLUS. We did some serious work on some pies and talked about what Pizza means to them. DIG IN:

 

Pizza Pal Joe Moore: How much do you like pizza?

Joe Paolucci: Bunches… I like the taste and I like the way it makes me feel afterwards.

Trevor Cunnion: Enough to eat pizza or pizza related food products about 4-6 times a week.

 

PPJM: What are your favorite toppings?

Joe: ‘Shrooms, peppers, plain, tomatoes.

Trevor: Mushrooms, onions, green peppers.

 

PPJM: What is your favorite pizza place in the world?

Joe: T.D. Alfredos in Phoenixville. It’s not good, but it’s better than it used to be.

Trevor: Franks. It’s on 23rd Street in New York City, between Park and Lexington.

 

PPJM: What is your favorite use of pizza in pop culture?

Joe: Tim Curry giving Macaulay Culkin pizza in the limo in Home Alone II.

Trevor: I think it’s Back to the Future 2 when they have that tiny pizza that they put in a microwave sort of device and it instantly becomes a real size pizza. I think that’s really great.  I would love to have something like that.

 

PPJM: What day was Pizza Day in your house growing up?

Joe: Friday. Always Friday.

Trevor: A day when we ate pizza, I guess.

 

PPJM: Tell me one fond pizza memory you have:

Joe: Being scared of that movie Cat’s Eye and eating pizza from Genuardi’s.

Trevor: I can’t recall the good times, but the worst pizza memory I have was when I ate a Kashi pizza and it was just awful.

 

PPJM: Anything else you’d like to add?

Joe: Hey! Please come see Camp Woods Plus on December 6th, Okay?

 

Do yourself a favor and head to THE FINAL CAMP WOODS +! Let me know where you are getting pizza before the show in the comments and we can meet up!

Also, here are some pictures Daring Daulton drew for Pizza Pals:

 

Joe Moore is a pizza enthusiast and head writer of PHIT Sketch Team Dog Mountain.

 

Pizza Pals with Joe Moore featuring…American Breakfast!

Quick tip pizza gang: Stay warm in the winter by cranking the oven up trying to make pies at home! Doughn’t be afraid to make your own pie – after some work, it will be most rewarding pizza you’ve ever tasted!

Another way to beat the cold is to get a job… at a pizzeria! I got to ham (and pineapple) it up with Nora, Sean, Peter and Eric who comprise local sketch heroes American Breakfast. They will be appearing at THE FINAL CAMP WOODS + on Thursday, December 6th at 8:30 pm We met right before one American Breakfest-er’s shift at Dominic’s in Voorhees, NJ to decimate some pies and talk about Ninja Turtles, Mary Kate and Ashley, and touching family memories. Get with it!

CONTINUE READING…

From the WitOut Archives: Top 5 of 2011 – Joe Moore’s Favorite Pictures

Twice a month, WitOut digs through its virtual piles of old columns to repost something great you may have missed.

This post was written by Joe Moorehead writer of PHIT Sketch Team Dog Mountain and the host of last year’s WitOut Awards.

My name is Joe Moore and I go to comedy shows in Philadelphia.

At a good deal of those shows, I like to drink beer. When I drink beer, I like to take pictures with my iPhone. People who drink beer and have an iPhone know that most often, these pictures are awful—upside-downers, close-ups of one of my fingers, and most of all, BLURRYs!

I just spent a good deal of time going through all of the pictures (some shows have one or two shots, and a few notable cases where I have close to 100!) and have selected my 5 favorite photos.

Out of the approximately 80 shows I went to and the many many shots, I’ve narrowed those down to my top 5:

In no order, here they are:

#1: “Changing of the Guard” Sketch Up or Shut Up – 3/4-5/2011

I think I killed most of a 6-pack (shared the rest) during Meg and Rob – Quality Value Convenience: The Final Meg & Rob Show. I know that I went to BOTH the Friday and the Saturday shows. I remember getting my shirt signed by BOTH Rob and Meg after one of the shows. I DO NOT remember putting the shirt in the washing machine that stole the signatures. And I just barely remember sticking around in front of the Shubin Theater after the Friday Show long enough to catch my second Sketch Up or Shut Up. A free show, Sketch Up is just as nice at twice the price and one of my favorite shows each month.

This photo depicts Meg passing the proverbial torch to Brian.

 

#2:Bird Text Comedy Showcase – 4/1/2011

The first Bird Text Show! This was one of my favorite nights of comedy all year, for 3 reasons: 1 – It was my first time seeing The Feeko Brother’s Jay PeeBee’s PB+J. / 2 – It was my first posted submission to WitOut.Net. / 3 – It was an incredible night of brilliant comedy. Easily the best line-up I’ve ever seen onstage at Helium.

A packed crowd got to see a killer line up of comedy and I drank a lot of beer.

Close readers of WitOut.net will note: I totally called the outcome of Philly’s Funniest and lit the match that became the Tommy Pope wild fire when I reported: ” 9:02 – Tommy Pope takes the stage. Is funny.”

#3: The Theme Show – 7/29/2011

The first Theme Show was a really fun night for me as well as a funny night for Philly Comedy. After taking the reigns of the fabled Bed Time Stories, an amazing legacy which I unfortunately didn’t drink enough to take pictures of, I’m sure both performers and audience were expecting some hiccups. Rob Banewicz had Gregg Gethard’s funny shoes to fill, and filled them well with an entertaining show that went off without a hitch.

#4: Hate Speech Hall’s Jesus is Really Galactus – 5/20-21/11

I took this picture at 2:35 AM. I have no idea what is going on here.

I think I’ve said enough.

#5:  The Final Bully Pulpit – 6/29/2011

My sustained adoration for Luke Giordano is VERY WELL documented on WitOut.Net. That being said, I was on stage this night which means it was probably the best night to be an audience member of anything ever. This was a photo I took from the stage, something I normally shouldn’t be able to do, but did anyway.

DISQUALIFIED #5A:  TV PARTY – 3/30/2011

Once a month, The Shubin hosts what I believe to be the most fun a person can ever have: Guilty Pleasures with Brendan Kennedy and Roger C. Snair, followed by TV Party with Paul Trigg and Rob Baniwicz. Hands down the best $10 I’ve ever spent, and the best $1,010 I plan on spending for the next 101 months.

They have an old hollowed out TV they use as a cooler…which also can sometimes be a hat.

Disqualified because I didn’t take the picture, but me wearing the TV/cooler from TV Party on my head is pretty cool.

 

WitOut is now accepting submissions from performers and comedy fans for our Top Five of 2012 list series. We are encouraging anyone to write about their favorite moments, shows, performers, sketches, quotes, or anything at all to help us recap and remember the past year in Philadelphia comedy. You can pitch your Top Five of 2012 idea to contact@witout.net.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 9

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 2

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Creator Spotlight: Polygon

By: Alison Zeidman

Back in July at Joe Gates’s apartment, I met with the producers of Polygon (Joe Gates, Marc Reber, Milkshake and Rick Horner via phone) to talk about how they got started, how they’ve blown up, and what’s next for their beloved monthly variety show.  During our chat, Joe offered me cherries he’d received in the mail from his mother, Rick was interrupted several times, Milkshake shared his views on circumcision, and I learned that  the men of Polygon have a…special…place in their hearts for my own improv team, Malone.
Alison Zeidman:Can you guys tell me how Polygon started?

Joe Gates: My group Rintersplit, which is Marc Reber, myself and Matt Akana, and Rick Horner with Claire Halberstadt as Suggestical, a little over a year ago had a show out at Milkboy in Bryn Mawr, and then we went out to a diner afterward and we were talking and it was like hey, it would be really great to start something up for people coming out of classes who really want to perform and really want to form a group, but aren’t finding spaces.

AZ: Is that still the primary goal, or mission, for Polygon? To be a place for new groups, or groups that struggle to get shows elsewhere?

Rick Horner: I might say our purpose is to encourage new comedic technique and encourage the performances of groups that are in the Philadelphia area at a pretty professional level, and focus on group dynamics as opposed to individual abilities, and really kind of provide a framework for the administrative operational side to encourage the integrity of the folks that are performing to perform in a professional way.

JG: We’ve actually been doing the Polygon show for over a year now; our birthday was back in April. We started out at another venue and ever since we’ve moved to L’etage we’ve just sort of upped the ante. I have more of a theater background [and at L’etage] we can just run it like a theater show.

AZ: Where were you guys before, and why did you move to L’etage?

JG: We were at Tabu before, a sports bar, and it was more of a…it was difficult to work with the sound of the bar behind us and it was a converted area that was sort of a stage but not quite, and we thought well we could get a place with an actual stage, and that’s where L’etage came in. We have a tech booth there, and we can do lighting, so instead of waving a phone madly at somebody to be like you have five minutes left, we can actually dim the lights and make it very professional. Originally we were only improv, but we saw a lot of things like storytelling really growing, and sketch, so we thought let’s include everybody.

AZ: Do you do most of the outreach to find those performers and groups, or do they come to you?

JG: Originally it was more of us doing the outreach, but we started to post on Facebook and just kind of put the word out there. So some of it’s kind of coming from the community now, now that we’ve kind of established ourselves a little bit.

AZ: So it’s new groups, developing teams, and also people trying to test things out a little bit.

JG: Yeah. I mean we’re not an open mic [laughs]. It’s different from an open mic in that you don’t get just three minutes and then somebody cuts you out. Again it’s more professional; we’re trying to make this like an actual show.

AZ: And where does the name come from?

RH: I think there was a strong push to make it Voltron because of the idea that Voltron is a bunch of pieces that get pushed together, but I thought that was just a little bit too straight on the money, so we kept discussing it until we came up with Polygon, which is just many different facets of something that’s all one thing.

AZ: Rick, you’re involved with so many different projects, your own groups, and F Harold, too. What do you feel sets Polygon apart, or what’s different about it for you as a producer?

RH: I think Polygon is just another piece of the puzzle. I would say that these things, whether it be Incubator or F Harold or Polygon, these are all levers that are designed to provide growth, whether it be with a mentor, or a venue. Whatever type of thing is needed. And I think for Polygon it’s really switching the lever of connecting folks and exchanging ideas and information with a bunch of people who are actively involved in the sketch community and the improv community and the stand-up community. So it’s a meeting point, and some of our shows have been really fluid like that, but it hasn’t always been that way. Thus far we have sought people out; it’s just now that folks are realizing that we’re more than just a monthly show, and they’re starting to seek us out.

AZ: And it seems like as much as it is for the community, the Polygon shows that I’ve been to usually have a lot of non-performers in the audience, so I’m curious about how you guys go about marketing your shows.

RH: Marketing is definitely a big focus for us. It’s fun to perform, and it’s more fun to perform for an audience, but given a choice between an audience of your peers, who are also doing it, and people who have never seen you before, it’s more fun and yet more challenging to perform for people when they have really no idea what to expect.

JG: I think the last Polygon we had maybe thirty people who were non-performers.

AZ: And why do you think that is? I work for the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance and I know from communicating with Marc that you guys are advertising on Phillyfunguide. Has that been successful for you guys?  Or maybe it’s not just that, but do you know how these outside people are finding out about you?

Marc Reber: We had a bunch of people mention that they’d seen us online, and Phillyfunguide does come up high when you search on Google.

RH: I think we are working on market research and figuring out who’s coming to our show and who our target audience is, but we’re kind of locked in on what we feel like people might be willing to pay, and frankly I think that it’s less than what is being charged at other theaters. I feel better about having a well-attended show that costs less, as opposed to a medium-sized show that costs more.

MR: And I think the last three months, we’ve tried to branch out our marketing, and I think it has improved things because we’ve definitely seen more and more people, who aren’t just improvisers.

AZ: So besides Facebook and Phillyfunguide, if you were going to make a recommendation for somebody else trying to market their show, could you say more about what’s worked for you guys?

MR: I think the next step is seeing what actual advertisement does. The online stuff is very voluntary–like someone has to actually be looking to go to an event to happen to be on Phillyfunguide, as opposed to seeing an advertisement as they’re reading a newspaper or something.  But either one of those, the online or the advertising, is just a way to expand your audiences.

JG: I think opening up Polygon to more than just improv has helped the numbers, too. I spoke to a couple at the last show and they said we’re just here to have a good time. We have no idea what’s going to happen, we just like to get out of the house. And I was like, this is the perfect place for you.

MR: And I want to second that to the extent that opening up to all forms of comedy in Philadelphia has made it easier to find acts, and that leaves more time for things like marketing.

AZ: Do you think the venue has anything to do with it?

MR: Yeah, it’s just a really great venue. It’s hard to deny that. And the bar is right there, it’s a very nice bar, it’s just a pleasant…it’s a total experience. And that venue has always been very popular, so we’re very lucky to be in that space.

AZ: Can we get into the specifics of what it takes to put on your own show? What are some of the technical challenges of just producing the show the night of, or leading up to it?

JG: Getting a variety of acts to come in, that’s the main challenge I think.  And I think one thing that people talk about often on the Philly Comedy Network on Facebook is getting the shows to start on time, so curtain is always at 8:05 just as a courtesy, but performers have to be there ahead of time. So call time is at 7, and then doors open at 7:30, and you let people in and really I think the call time for the performers was the most difficult thing, but it was also the best thing for the show in terms of structure. Because they have time to warm up, sort of situate themselves, look at the stage instead of coming in maybe five minutes after one group has already started and seeing oh that stage isn’t going to work for us, or the lighting is wrong, or we need more chairs. So getting everybody there ahead of time, it just makes everything work kind of like clockwork. And definitely getting a space that you love and other people love coming to and love performing at, that’s pretty important.  And I guess just kind of organizing the groups is kind of fun too. You want something really powerful and awesome, you want something that people have never seen before but will really make them think about coming back, and you want new people too. We love new people, we love their lovely faces. And I think [your team] Malone is an excellent example of that; you guys are kind of really climbing the ladder.

RH: Yeah don’t forget to mention Malone, say something about how great they are.

JG: Malone is one of the most attractive…

Milkshake: They’re really good looking, is the thing. It’s hard to compete. No matter how good your team is, you have to compete with the fact that Malone is a very, very fuckable team.

MR: And there are more than five of them, so.

Milkshake: There’s more to choose. As if you needed to choose. Any one of them, male or female, they’re all..

AZ: One of our members is under 18…I’ll just point that out.

Milkshake: I don’t care! I don’t discriminate!

MR: Let’s say very kissable.

Milkshake: Very kissable!

JG: I would hold hands with any member of that team, on a date, in a meadow.

AZ: Let’s talk about what upcoming things you guys have planned.

JG: Well I’m really looking forward to the October show. October is one of my favorite months. I grew up with ghost stories and things like that, so I want to get Rintersplit to perform in October because we’re kind of more ghost-oriented, and there are a couple of storytellers I would really like to get in and tell some gnarly ghost story stuff.

AZ: Do you usually try to do themed shows?

JG: I’m getting more into it. Like our last show we had at Tabu, it was all ladies’ night, lady-oriented, and it was Mani Pedi’s first show and they are fantastic.

MR:  But that’s not really our point, our point is more just to have a show that everyone can enjoy, that performers can enjoy, and an opportunity for us to perform, because we are among the independent comedy community. So if the theme works out great, and if there are opportunities like October and Halloween, then it’s like hey, why not go for it.

AZ: Can you guys talk a little bit more about some of the new components of the show, like Philly Secrets?

MR: Well Milkshake is the director and he had the idea of doing something along the lines of Post ecret, where the idea is that people send in their secrets and essentially they’re shared but still secret because they’re anonymous. And to the extent that these are very moving pieces, they provide a lot of emotion and a lot of background, things that are all in improv.

Milkshake: I think just one nice thing about the Secrets show is that the source material itself, the secrets that we use, particularly when they come from PostSecret it’s a very visual experience, it’s a quick snapshot of somebody’s situation that they’re having difficulty dealing with. So they create this anonymous art, and they send it to Frank Warren in Baltimore and they get it off their chest and they share it with other people.  Just those in and of themselves are so interesting that to do theatrical work that’s inspired by that, wow, you’ve got a great diving board into a beautiful swimming pool to kick off from.

AZ: Are you using the secrets from PostSecret, or are you soliciting your own?

Milkshake: We’re soliciting secrets from Philadelphia, however the method by which I had chosen to do that was insufficient and I wasn’t getting the responses that I need. We’re still working on acquiring more, but yeah, the first two performances were entirely reliant on secrets from the PostSecret website. And I have no beef with that, but I want to do the show about secrets of people from Philadelphia. And the scenes that we see can be usually funny but not necessarily, especially with somebody like Kristen Schier on the team, who loves any opportunity to do improvised dramatic work. And a nice thing that was pointed out to me is when you take a secret that’s difficult to deal with, like one that’s about abuse or addiction, that usually won’t be a funny scene, but the scene after that, as long as it’s remotely funny, the audience is so ready to laugh that the response is usually pretty explosive.

AZ: How was it determined that Phily Secrets would be a good feature for Polygon?

JG: It’s so fresh, and so new, and it’s a very rich format and it’s laden with dramatic scenes.

Mlikshake: And there’s a lot of sexual ones.  There are a lot about penises.

JG: [whispering] This is going in the paper!

Mlikshake: Well, she’ll snip and cut. Edit.

AZ: I don’t want to snip and cut any penises…

Milkshake: Don’t, no! Don’t do that, it’s not necessary. It has no medical benefit. But I was going to say, I would like to do an entire Secrets performance where we’re free to  choose the sexual material if we want to, but not have it foisted upon us. And that’s kind of my job as host and curator, to choose the secrets that we’ll work from. But then I think to myself, it would also be cool to have a show where every scene is of a sexual nature.

JG: I’m going to go back and try to answer the question that you asked. I think another one of the reasons that we picked Secrets as kind of a Polygon mainstay is because there’s so many different things that come out of it that we don’t really see in improv, and that’s kind of what we’re all about, the new stuff, the fresh stuff.

AZ: And it sounds like Secrets also has this level of built-in theatricality and drama, and sort of that elevated level of theater that you’re trying to present with Polygon.

JG: When I was a student of dramaturgy, three of the questions that we always asked ourselves of a play where why this play, why now, and why this audience?

Milkshake: We did go over those questions. Did I answer them well?

RH: You answered them. I don’t know how well.

Milkshake: Were you dissatisfied, Rick, with my answers? Do you remember dissatisfaction?

RH: Well you seemed dodgy and unconfident, that’s all.

Milkshake: OK, that sounds like me.

JG: You mentioned at many times during your presentation that people are fascinated by real people’s lives.  But also these people are opening themselves up to us. And kind of trusting us with a secret.

Milkshake: And in turn I feel like the work the cast is doing by improvising a scene is kind of metaphorically putting their arm around that person and embracing them. We’re exploring it and experiencing it with them, sort of, to the best of our ability, through theatre.

AZ: So just to wrap up, Polygon is once a month at L’etage, and the best way to book a show is to…

JG: Contact Joe or Mark.

AZ: And if you have a secret that you want to see explored in Philly Secrets?

Milkshake: The best way is to go to formspring.me/phillysecrets.

MR: And Polygon is once a month, at L’etage, but we’ll also be part of Fringe again this year, and I’ll let Rick talk a little bit about that.

RH: We’re finalizing the venue, but I expect that this year there’s going to be some good surprises, which I’m not certain I’m ready to divulge quite yet. I might describe the Fringe this year as more opportunities for people to get involved. And there’s likely to be some sort of a process specifically to submit to the Fringe shows which will be coming out pretty soon, so people will have slightly more control over their involvement.

JG: So look for updates online, and if you have something new and beautiful and need a space to do it, we’d love to check you out.

The next Polygon show is Tuesday, August 14th at 8 pm at L’etage (624 S. 6th Street). Tickets are $5.

Pizza Pals with Joe Moore featuring Angel Yau

What’s shakin’ pizza dawgs? Since we last spoke, I’ve been going crazy over Ricotta on pies – it’s underrated and awesome! Also, I got to talk to Angel Yau, my favorite funny-ist from New York City, about pizza. Talking Pizza with a New Yorker is always fun, because many of my favorite pizza places are in the 5 boroughs. My conversadventure with Angel encompassed all sorts of stops in the Pizzaverse.

Read this!!! :

Pizza Pal Joe Moore: So, how much do you like pizza?

Angel Yau: I like pizza like I like ice cream.
(Please read Joe’s ice cream blog to follow this analogy.)

PPJM: How often do you eat pizza?

AY: I eat pizza as often as I eat tacos…
(Gotcha! Probably once every 2 weeks.)

PPJM: What day is Pizza Day in your house?

AY: Definitely whenever I am lazy to cook, which is once or twice a week…
(But that doesn’t make sense with question 2… SHUT UP INNER ANGEL!)

PPJM: Any favorite toppings or do you prefer it plain?

AY: MEAT! Specifically sausage. The artificial looking, small poop kind, not the sliced ones.
I only prefer plain if I don’t have money and only if it’s a New York slice… otherwise MEAT MEAT MEAT. Sometimes if I do frozen pizza, I’d add my own pepperoni and mushrooms and extra cheese… defeats the purpose of a quick frozen pizza but it makes me feel like I made it ALL out of scratch.

PPJM: What is your favorite pop-culture pizza reference (TV, Film or music)?

AY: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ pizzas always look sooooooo delicious.
Also Give me pizza, by Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen. Also Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell, the song is great because I heart me some Taco Bell. I really love the Spicy Chicken Crunch Wrap Supreme but they fucking discontinued that or something! WHY!!??!?! IT WAS MY FAVORITE!!!!

PPJM: Favorite pizza place in New York City? Favorite pizza place anywhere else?

AY: I grew up with Pizza Hut. My mom hates cheese so the supreme pizza at the hut is the choice because of the other toppings/bread to cheese ratio. Also their tiny neon orange buffalo wings ARE DELICIOUS. I also grew up with Mama Celeste frozen pizza (supreme of course). I also grew up in Howard Beach, Queens… which is primarily an Italian neighborhood. The go to after elementary school pizza there is La Villa. Also I just remember this from writing about pizza is Singas pizza… it’s a New York chain. I only at there a handful of times when I was little, whenever I want to break my parents’ heart, denying their home cooked food. I always get the chopped sausage and onion pizza. I especially like those two toppings because the sausage was chopped into tiny pieces and was back inside… the cheese was on top! What a delightful surprise! And the onions were sliced super thin like string. It’s not a New York slice, it’s a personal thin pie kind of thing! Oh there’s also a place in Greenpoint, Bk where I lived for a few years in my adult life called Paulie Gee’s… it’s one of the those Brick Oven, bacon jam, dimly lit pizza places. Is the question what pizzas you grew up with Angel? NO! It was what is your favorite in nyc!!! WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU?!?!? NO ONE IS GOING TO LIKE TO YOU ANGEL YAU!

PPJM: Anything else you’d like to add?

AY: Also can we talk about Italian Ices at these pizza parlors?!?!? Rainbow and Vanilla & Chocolate Chip! COME ON!!!

Boom! Awesome! Angel will be onstage here in Philly in a SUPER RARE performance tonight at Camp Woods + at L’Etage. Don’t miss it! This is your best chance to catch one of Angel’s mind-bending multi-media sets without spending $8 to cross a bridge!