Upcoming Shows

  • October 30, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 30, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 31, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 31, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 31, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 1, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Heliun
  • November 1, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • November 1, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • November 1, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • November 1, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • November 1, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • November 1, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • November 5, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • November 6, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 6, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • November 7, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • November 7, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • November 7, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • November 7, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • November 7, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 7, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 8, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
AEC v1.0.4

Philly Improv Fest Ends With a Bang!

Amie and Kristen - Phif13 - PO

Amie tries to control Kristen’s temper tantrum.

The final show of Philly Improv Fest had the crowd laughing along to dynamic scenes from duos Hot Dog (Jessica Ross and Luke Field), Billy Hawk (Brian O’Connell and Jeff Hawkins), The Amie and Kristen Show (Amie Roe and Kristen Schier) and Vox Pop (Karen Lange and Jordan Hirsch).  Each of the groups jumped from scene to scene and kept the audeince laughing at everything from the perception of white Jesus to the marital problems between a blind husband and his wife.

At some point, you don’t even know what you’re laughing at anymore… but you’re cracking up!

Hot Dog’s comedic timing and chemistry kept crowds in hysterics as they created funny scenarios on marriage, employment opportunities and awkward dates. Whether it was playing a blind husband or a jovial employee, Luke Field can change the scene faster than you can count to two. Complementing his comedic timing was Jess Ross, whose ability to adapt to her partner’s theatrics is equally impressive.

Speaking of awkward couples, who can deny the charm of a male duo that can convince you that they are an opposite sex couple. Billy Hawk’s ability to transform into characters and bridge gaps of physicality is truly amazing. Whether it was playing a husband and wife, God and his son, Jesus and Mary Magdalene, Billy Hawk had the audience on the edge of their seats waiting to see what characters they would play next.

Perhaps the most animated act of the night was The Amie and Kristen Show. It’s no secret that they are one of Philly’s best comedy duos. Best friends and improv masters, their chemistry is evident as they put on a parody of a frog-prince and princess. “It’s a shirt with muscles sewn into it, now you look like the other princes!” says Amie to her (British) frog-prince Kristen. The scene changes in less than a millisecond from a mother trying to control her son who is throwing a temper tantrum to a couple cuddling and talking about the future. This girl-power duo consistently reminded us that the beauty of comedy lies in the power of words and how you say them.

Jordan Hirsch and Karen Lange of Vox Pop ended the night with their musical act consisting of parodies of work culture and every-day married couple problems. The musicality, the duo’s awesome facial expressions and comedic timing made the comedy and music flow together to provide a highly entertaining ending to a night full of laughter.

Another WitOut EXCLUSIVE: The Making of Tweets of the Week – Featuring Luke Field & Judd Apatow

 

Luke Field is a Philly Improv Theater instructor, a member of PHIT House Teams Asteroid! (improv) and The Flat Earth (sketch), and one half of the improv duo Hot Dog.

Judd Apatow is The Judd Apatow.

Fringe Show Review: twenty-four

Twenty-four is an improv show in real time. There are no cuts or edits, no jumps in time or space. All of the action takes place in one location in the same amount of time it takes to watch the show. The format leads to the actors being able to portray rich characters and develop deep relationships in the twenty four minutes they are together on stage. Last night, the cast of this Philly Improv Theater Fringe production put those skills on display expertly.

Twenty-four is a two act show, with the cast performing two separate monoscenes. Last night’s performance featured two halves that showed off the cast member’s range of styles and characters. The first scene took place in a hospital where a cast of characters all waited for their mutual acquaintance, played by Emily Davis, to give birth to her child. The story revealed a busy career woman, eager for her baby to arrive so that she may return to work and the people in her lives effected by her lifestyle. Her sperm donor (Mike Marbach) was curiously present at the hospital, while it was later revealed by her sister (Cait O’Driscoll) that there may be something more than just a one time donation going on. The future nanny of the child (Jessica Ross) handed out balloons and worried if she would be a good fit to take care of the child. The “facilitator” of the sperm donation (Bobbi Block) continued her role in the hospital as she calmed people down and was there to lend a helping hand in all the madness. The mother-to-be’s assistant (Becca Trabin) came to deliver a present from the office, and ended up delivering something far more important (the baby!) All the action took place while an in-over-her-head candy stripe (Corin Wells) raced around a hospital she seemed to be the only employee of.

The strengths of the first act were in the strong character choices made by the cast. Each improvisor brought their own idea to their character and stuck with it to the end. Emily Davis showed the non stop work ethic of her career driven character even in the last moments of pregnancy. Mike Marbach did his best to remain supportive of the mother of his child even while those around him questioned their relationship. Corin Wells was overworked and exhausted as the seventeen-year-old candy stripe just trying to get community service hours so she can graduate. Becca Trabin portrayed the do-all assistant of a powerful business woman hilariously, showing how prepared one would have to be to be the right hand woman of a non stop workaholic.

The second act begins with director Steve Kleinedler telling the audience that a character of their choice will return for the second scene, and all the other actors would portray someone new. Becca Trabin’s character was selected by one audience member, to cheers of approval from others. The second scene took place in a beauty salon while the patrons prepared for their prom, or “practice wedding” or were just there to have their hair done by the saucy salon staff. The first act of last night’s show had characters entering and exiting the scene fluidly, changing focus and centering on different relationships at different times while the second act had more convergence. The scene began will all but one character (Marc Reber‘s salon worker – who would soon enter) on stage. Most of the performers were all on stage and in the scene at the same time, and the cast members handled the crowded scene excellently. Most of the time the conversation took place between a few characters while the rest of the cast patiently waited, flipping through magazines, or styling hair – but a few times, the stage was full of action with multiple conversations happening at once. The performers were adept, not letting the conversations become just a jumble of noise, but speaking up and quieting down to let the audience key in on the funny parts of what they each were saying.

Twenty-four is a sharply put together show with a diverse, skilled cast of improvisors that will make you care about the characters, draw you in to this moment in their lives, and make you laugh along the way.

There are still three chances to see twenty-four, tonight at 5pm, Tuesday, September 13 at 7pm, and Friday, September 16 at 830pm. All shows are at the Mainstage of the Adrienne Theater. Tickets can be purchased online.