Upcoming Shows

  • September 18, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 18, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • September 19, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • September 19, 2014 7:30 pmFirst Fridays w/ Interrobang
  • September 19, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • September 19, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • September 19, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 19, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 20, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • September 20, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • September 20, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • September 20, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • September 20, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • September 25, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 25, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • September 26, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • September 26, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • September 26, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • September 26, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 26, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • September 27, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • September 27, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • September 27, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • September 27, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • September 27, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
AEC v1.0.4

Following up… Q&A w/ Will “Spank” Horton

Will-Spank-HortonLast week we had the chance to catch-up with Philly Native, Will “Spank” Horton after his show at Helium Comedy Club
~~~~~

WitOut: Can you tell us a little bit about your early days in the Philadelphia comedy scene?

Spank: My early days were a little rough; I wasn’t taking comedy very seriously. I was just told I was a funny guy, so I would just go on stage and play around. After the first year, I got a phone call to do comic-view. From then on, I took comedy seriously. I started to dress a little better and market my own brand.

WitOut: Is that when you really fell in love with comedy?

Spank: I fell in love with comedy after my fourth or fifth year. After the sixth year, I got a call from Kevin Hart. He told me he had been watching my shows and wanted me to go on tour with him. After that I got really serious and went dead-hard. That was in 2007. I started in 2001.

WitOut: What do you consider to be some of the biggest achievements in your career thus far?

Spank: A standing ovation as an opener for Kevin Hart.,Iit was one of those shows where everyone was paying $40-$50 to see Kevin Hart and for me to come out and do my 15-20 minutes and receive a standing ovation, I thought, “I could definitely do this.” Kevin helped me get to where I am at. I used to be known locally, but now I am known world-wide.

WitOut: If you could perform comedy anywhere in the world, where would it be and why?

Spank: It is going to sound real cliché-ish, but I am going say my hometown, Philadelphia.

WitOut: I had a feeling you might say that…

Spank: I am so Philly, man. A lot of people say stuff about their hometown like, “Ahh no, you gotta get outta here,” but I have been here all my life and I am still flourishing.

WitOut: You were recently in the movie, Ride Along. How was your experience working with Ice Cube and Kevin Hart?

Spank: It was fun. Even though I worked with Kevin on the road it was completely different on set. And Ice Cube kept telling me I was doing really well. He made me feel as if I were a veteran. It was great; I had my own little trailer. I was the only actor with four lines that had his own trailer and I think that was because the producer and everyone thought of me as one of the boys.

WitOut: What was different about working with Kevin Hart on set as opposed to working with him on the road?

Spank: On the road there was more “silly, silly, hey-hey, buddy-buddy.” The movie was serious [work]. He wanted to be in character. I was in my trailer before my lines, he was in his. On the road, we just wile out!

WitOut: Who are some of your comedy heroes?

Spank: Eddie Murphy, Dave Chappelle, Chris Rock, Martin, Bernie Mac. I am a fan of all the greats and all of those that do open-mic. My number one would have to be Eddie Murphy.

***Spank married his long-time sweetheart in 2012 and still is a resident of the Greater Philadelphia Area. You can find him up in the township, arguing with his neighbors over parking spots “township style.”

Q&A With Comedian and Writer Dana Gould at Helium Comedy Club

Dana Gould at Helium Comedy Club

The calm before the storm. The storm being when Gould runs around the stage attacking like a chimp.

Dana Gould has written for The Simpsons and Parks and Recreation. He currently acts in the TNT series Mob City. Gould will be performing at Helium for four shows from Wednesday through Saturday. We caught up with him to talk about writing for television and his career in comedy.
~~~~~

WitOut: What was it like working for Parks and Recreation? Can you tell us about a memorable contribution you made to the show?

Dana Gould: I wrote during Season 2 in the awkward years when it was taking a while for the show to gel. I coined the name “Duke Silver” for Ron Swanson’s saxophone playing alter ego and created his album name “Memories of Now.” It’s funny because Largo, a place where I perform stand up in L.A., has a framed copy of that album that they had made up and put on the wall.

WitOut: What was one of your favorite creative contributions to The Simpsons?

Gould: I wrote an episode from Season 16 called “Goo Goo Gai Pan” where Homer and Marge go to China and adopt a daughter for Marge’s sister which was based on my own experience of adopting my two daughters.

WitOut: Do you have any advice for comedians that want to write for TV?

Gould: My advice is to just do it. Don’t take a class or anything, just do it. A writer who isn’t writing isn’t a writer. It takes discipline. You have to make a habit of getting up every day and doing it. Make it your top priority and don’t leave the house until you get it done.

WitOut: What have been some of the highs and lows of your career?

Gould: When I first started out in stand up I was obsessed with Albert Brooks. Albert was at a Simpson’s Party later in his career and I had met him several times before in a professional setting, but one time at this “Hollywood Party,” all the sudden he just said, “Hi Dana.” He was always this hero of mine and in this moment I saw him as a peer. Oh and everything since then was a low.

Dana Gould at Helium Comedy Club

“God only hits the Midwest with tornadoes because he’s really far away and he must think farmers look like lesbians.”

WitOut: Did you make any New Year’s Resolutions this year?

Gould: It’s strange because 2013 was terrible, personally. I got divorced. But, professionally, I released a new album that was number one on iTunes and I am getting to do amazing stuff on Mob City.

I’m just hoping for something in the middle this year.

WitOut: Any comments on the Chris Christie scandal?

Gould: I assumed the lane was blocked because Christie wanted people to know how it feels for him to squeeze down the aisle of an airplane.

Check out Gould tonight (7:30p.m & 10:00p.m.) and tomorrow (10:00p.m.) at Helium Comedy Club

Interview with Streeter Seidell of CollegeHumor Live, Friday Night @ The Trocadero

CHLiveTour-promo-clean150CollegeHumor’s Streeter Seidell seems like the kind of upfront, no bullshit type of comic Philadelphia can appreciate. However, he admitted he’s a little nervous about making his City of Brotherly Love debut when we talked about his upcoming show at the Trocadero Theatre this Friday. The White Wine author is part of the CollegeHumor Live tour alongside Jake Hurwitz & Amir Blumenfeld–stars of the long-running CollegeHumor.com web series Jake and Amir.

WitOut: Will it be the first time performing in Philly for all three of you?

Streeter Seidell: I think Jake and Amir did a college show in Philly once. But I haven’t even been there until about a month ago, which was a great embarrassment for me. I was totally ashamed because I grew up in Connecticut and I’m a massive history buff and Ben Franklin fan. And I like eating fattening food so I was like, how have I not been to this city? But I thought it was a great city. I’m a little nervous because I’ve never performed in Philly and you do hear this terrible rumors about audiences in Philly being crazy mean.

WitOut: Yeah, it’s nonsense. Just don’t suck.

Seidell: Yeah, that’s what I’ve been banking on. The problem is though, that I suck.

WitOut: So how did you get in at CollegeHumor?

Seidell: I was writing articles for the site when I was in college and just got on their radar and got hired right out of school.

WitOut: According to Wikipedia you were studying communications, did you have any idea what you would’ve done after college with that?

Seidell: Uh, I guess I would’ve worked at a talent agency which is where I had been an intern for a while. But thank god CollegeHumor hired me because I would’ve been a terrible agent.

WitOut: What was the experience like when CollegeHumor had a show on MTV, The CollegeHumor Show?

Seidell: It was so much fun. We were probably all 25, 26 and, it was a blast. I grew up watching MTV so the thought of having a show on MTV that I was acting in and helping write was extremely exciting. If only anyone watched it! Maybe I’d still be excited. But it was exhausting, frustrating, and extremely fun.

WitOut I saw you recently got a puppy? Will you be leaving it while you’re on tour?

Seidell: Aw, I wish you didn’t put it like that but yes I am.

WitOut: What can we expect at the show? What’s the format?

Seidell: Well, I’m not all the way sure yet. Usually Jake and Amir come out and do their thing, I come out and do my thing. Then we’ll do something together at the end. What exactly those things will be is yet to be determined. I’ll do stand-up, which, if I can see the crowd, might involve making fun of a kid in the front row. But, I will guarantee you it will be very funny.

WitOut: Despite you sucking?

Seidell: I might suck, but the three of us together, our powers combined, can make one funny show!

WitOut: The Voltron principle.

Seidell: Exactly, or the Captain Planet principle.

WitOut: You’ve co-written some books but you recently published your first book White Whine (http://whitewhine.com, available in stores and online now) on your own, what was that like?

Seidell: Do you remember writing essays or papers for college? Imagine doing that 250 times. And that was kinda like what writing a book was like, except you can say whatever you want and someone will give you money for it. So it was pretty fun!

WitOut: You’ve done sketch, stand-up, television, books, is there a form you haven’t done yet but would like to?

Seidell: Yeah, I guess, a movie right? Like, a major motion picture? Or, I’d really like to explore what I can do on Pinterest. That’s a form I really have yet to conquer. It’s really impressive, in a nine year career I’ve failed in almost every medium, which, not a lot of people can say. I’ll try anything really.

WitOut: Right, like me pretending to be a journalist here. I just write dick jokes in Philly but, I’m talking to you now.

Seidell: Are you the Philadelphia Dick Jokesmith?

WitOut: You’ve heard of me.

Seidell: Dude, how did you get that job I applied for that, I sent in a packet and everything.

WitOut: Well I apprenticed under the previous Dick Jokesmith.

Seidell: Ah, nepotism.

WitOut: What advice would you give someone who is trying to find a way to a career writing comedy?

Seidell: There is no place to go to apply for that job so anyone who wants to be a comedy writer can just start being a comedy writer. I’ve always had kids ask me “I really want to do stand-up” or “I want to write videos” or “I want to make things on YouTube”, well you shouldn’t have to want that cause you can just do that. There’s really no excuse to not just start doing it and, you’ll be pretty terrible for a while but then, hopefully, you’ll get a little better. And maybe one day I can be threatened by you and do everything in my power to stop your rise to fame.

WitOut: If you could be any animal, what would it be?

Seidell: Besides “better human”?

WitOut: That’s fine.

Seidell: Otherwise I was gonna say “Swedish person.”

 WitOut: That’s basically the same thing. Anyway, thanks Streeter!

~~~~~

See Streeter Seidell, along with Jake & Amir, when CollegeHumor Live hits the Trocadero Theatre (1003 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA), this Friday November 15th and 8:00pm. Get tickets here.

Dave Metter is a Philly comedian, check him out on Twitter @DaveMetter, and check out his fake local news show Your News, Philadelphia Friday December 6th at the Shubin Theatre.

Alison Zeidman and Aaron Hertzog Interview Each Other about Free For All

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Editors’ note: We are the editors of WitOut.net. We are also starting a free, weekly, stand-up comedy showcase every Wednesday at Rembrandt’s Restaurant & Bar (741 N. 23rd St. Philadelphia). So we decided to take advantage of our editorial power for shameless self-promotion. Is that okay with you? Good. Here we go.

AZ Why did we decide to start this show?

AH: You know the answer to that.

AZ: Tell me again. I like hearing the story.

AH: I think this is the type of show that Philly needs. The scene has been growing in the past few years and there are open mics practically every night of the week, and there are  a lot of comedian-run monthly showcases, and I think the next step up is a weekly show where comedians can work on longer sets. I would love to do this show every night if I could, and make it like a Philadelphia version of The Comedy Cellar in New York. But until I find a venture capitalist to back that business plan, I’m going to have to stick with once a week at a bar that will let us do it for free. Philly has a lot of great comedians, and part of the goal with the show is to expose more of the public to some of the great local comedy Philly has to offer.

What are your hopes and plans for the show?

AZ:  I’m really looking forward to having a show that gives Philly comics an opportunity to perform longer sets, and hopefully perform them in front of a crowd that’s made up of more than just other comics–of course we love seeing comics support one another, but we also want a “real audience” for these shows. Which brings me to my other hope for the show: that people will come.  So we’re working on some creative ideas for marketing and promotion, and reaching out to people who are good at getting the word out about events in the city, and hopefully we’ll be able to show a lot of new people that Philly has a really strong, talented crop of local comedians.  And if they’re introduced to them here with a free show, hopefully they’ll continue to follow and support their work elsewhere.

Can you talk a little bit more about why we wanted to keep the show free? Are we just dicks who don’t want to pay people?

AH: Well first of all, I hate that money exists and I wish I could live in a hut on an island and hunt and farm and fish for food and just be free. That sounds like a joke but I’m being serious. But, in terms of the show, since one of our goals is to raise awareness about comedy in Philly we thought a great way to do that would be to have a free show, so it’s a low-risk access point for new audiences.  Doogie Horner’s Ministry of Secret Jokes was a great free show that brought a lot of people out to Fergie’s in Center City on a monthly basis, and we want to build a consistent audience of people who know that there’s going to be a great show at Rembrandt’s every Wednesday night, and who can tell people they know that they can come to the show and it’s going to be free and it’s going to be great and they’re going to have a good time. Plus we want this to be a show that has a feel, for the audience, that it’s professional and the line-up is well put together, but is also a show where the comedians should feel free to experiment a little, and work out newer material during a longer set.  At open mics where there are more comics and therefore sets have to be shorter, one new joke might be the only material a comic gets to do that night.

Since we’re not getting fat pockets off the big stacks of cash we’d make if we charged people to come and see this show, what are you looking to get out of it, as a comedian?

AZ: I think it’ll be good for me to get more experience hosting shows, and I also want to push myself to write a lot more frequently so I can have something new every week.  I also like how much flexibility and trust the bar is giving us in running this show–I think it’s exciting that we’re building this from the ground up, and we’re going to have this challenge of making sure it’s successful.  That also makes it a little scary, and I think we’re both going to have to think really creatively and work really hard to make sure it works and really have an impact on Philly’s knowledge of and interest in its local comedy scene.

We have some of the best comics in the city on the line-up for the first show, and we’ve actually booked the rest of the month already, and that’s pretty stacked as well.  How do you think being on a show with all these really exceptional writers and performers will affect your performance?

AH: Not only do I want the show to be great top to bottom for the sake of the audience, but I think it’s a great opportunity for all of us as comedians to push each other to keep getting better.  It’s healthy competition–not that it’s a contest and we’re going out there to try to outshine each other every week, but I know that personally I’m going to have to bring it in order to keep up with the talent that we’re going to book on this show week in and week out.  I’m never going to be able to half-ass it and mail in a set if I don’t want to look like somebody who doesn’t belong on the show. That’s how you get better–when I was a kid and I played basketball, I didn’t get better by playing against kids I was already better than; I got better by playing against older kids who were a lot better than me, and having to work to keep up.  Also I’m just looking forward to being able to hang out with all of these people on a weekly basis and see them trying out new jokes, and talking about new jokes, and getting their opinion on my new material, and just all working together at getting better. #Friendship.

You and I are big supporters of the local comedy scene and we know a lot about what’s going on within it.  But at this point it’s still difficult to know about Philly comedy if you’re not IN Philly comedy in some way. What do you think we–or anyone else performing in the city–needs to do to get more of the general public aware of the local talent?

AZ: I think the main thing is that if you’re putting on a show, you should never be satisfied with just getting an audience that’s only made up of your friends and fellow performers. If you’re trying to do this seriously and not just as a hobby, you need feedback from and exposure to a real audience to be able to learn and grow.  Of course it’s great to be supportive of each other, but I don’t think any of us will consider ourselves successful if we’re just doing this for each other all the time.  So we should be looking for as many ways as possible to expose new people to our shows. List and promote your show on local online events calendars, send out press releases, get out on the street with flyers, whatever it takes.  Find new audiences, bring them in, win them over and keep them coming back–whether that’s coming back to Free For All, or “coming back” in that they find their favorite comedians at our show, and then go seek them out to see them do more at other shows, too.

Also: We all just have to be really, really good.  Put on a good show that’ll live up to or even exceed the hype you’re giving it when you’re promoting it.

 

The First Free For All Stand-Up Comedy Showcase is tonight at 8pm at Rembrandt’s Restaurant & Bar (741 N. 23rd St. Philadelphia). For more information on the show as well as original and shared content you can check out Free For All on WordPress, Facebook, and Twitter.

Brendan Kennedy Petitions Kickstarter

Brendan Kennedy has a dream. That dream includes getting drunk and making web videos in which he heckles people’s family photos while wearing a Batman mask. All dreams come at a cost; the price tag on Brendan’s reads “$10.00″. In order to help him achieve his goals of making Drunk Batman Heckles Your Family Photos a reality Brendan turned to Kickstarter, the online fundraising tool used by artists to raise money from people who support and believe in their projects. But Brendan was denied. The site that recently helped TV and movie-star Zach Braff raise over $3 million to produce a film told Brendan his project “…does not meet our guidelines.” Brendan once again is turning to the internet for help; creating a petition where he is asking supporters of his to tell Kickstarter to “stop acting like Drunk Batman Heckles Your Family Photos isn’t all that.” We contacted the former Philadelphia comedian by email to ask him about his current situation.

WitOut: Can you please take a moment to describe your vision for your project Drunk Batman Heckles Your Family Photos.

 
Brendan Kennedy: I’d like to make a webseries in which i get drunk and make fun of weird old family photos I find on google image search. When you’re trying to be a standup in LA, you’re just another face in a sea of almost good looking faces. So i’m gonna put a mask on and talk shit on people who I don’t know. I will make up backstories for these people and then claim they wronged me, or someone I know, who may or may not be real, depends upon the week.
WO: From my understanding after an initial proposal Kickstarter asked you to revise your campaign after which you were denied the opportunity to raise funds using their services. What were your thoughts on receiving news of your rejection? How have you handled it since?
 
BK: I thought it was predictable and disappointing. I revised my proposal per their suggestions (even though I was NOT in violation of their guidelines) and re-submitted. Then they just flat out rejected it, claiming that my project didn’t fit within their guidelines. Which would be fine if I was in violation of their guidelines, but I am NOT. They made a judgement call. Either my goal of raising 10 dollars to buy an adult batman mask seems too silly for their super serious website. (A website that people use to raise money to make board games and concept albums.) Or 10 dollars wasn’t enough money for them to waste their time, since after all, they take a percentage of the money raised. (Ya know, because they’re good people who want to help…)
WO: How do you feel about sites such as Kickstarter in terms of giving artists without an “in” to big-budget financiers an opportunity to raise funding to help make their dream projects become a reality?
 
BK: I think they are a money making scheme. Zach Braff is already famous, that’s why he’s able to raise almost 3 million dollars. They remind me of the commercials on tv where the old man asks you if you think you are good at drawing, and then for money he will send you a test to see if you really are good at drawing. The people themselves are the ones raising the money, it’s just an easier way to tell people about the project that you are trying to raise money for than making your own blog and paypal set up. I thought that maybe, even though they take some of the money you raise, they were still a good company that just needs money to operate. Now I just think that they are just a company that wants money.
WO: What are your thoughts on the recent wave of more high-profile celebrities and projects (Zach Braff, Veronica Mars) using Kickstarter as a way to raise funds from their fans to create projects? (To play Devil’s Advocate some would argue this lets fans feel like “a part” of the production – and that paying to see a movie in the theaters is even similar to donating to the cause – just after the fact…)
 
BK: It’s a publicity stunt. Which is why I wanted to use it! I figured that whoever gave me the 10 bucks to buy the mask would watch at least the first episode. Donating to help fund a movie is similar to buying a ticket, except that after you donate to help have the movie made, you still have to pay to go see it. I just checked, you have to pay 30 dollars to get to see Zach Braff’s movie without paying any more money. Also, letting people feel like they are part of something in exchange for their money has been part of many great scams in the past. For example, the whole buy a star and name it craze.
WO: Usually Kickstarter campaigns give some benefits or rewards to donators; if your project does eventually get approved what can those who give to your project expect to receive as tokens of your appreciation?
 
BK: I had it set up so that for 5 bucks, I’d let you pick a photo that i’d make fun of in one episode. And for 25 dollars i’d mail you an autographed photo of drunk batman. Despite the fact that I only wanted 10 dollars, kickstarter suggested 25 as a good starting point for rewards. (because they just want people’s money!!)
WO: How far do you think Drunk Batman Heckles Your Family Photos can go if just given the chance?
 
BK: I’m not gonna bullshit people and claim that this kickstarter will change the way webseries are made, because that would be stupid. Also, it’s stupid to claim that people donating money to get a movie made will change the way movies are made!! So i’ll just be honest, if given a chance, Drunk Batman Heckles Your Family Photos can go all the way to YouTube! Or maybe Funny or Die, I haven’t decided yet.
WO: Finally, let our readers know why they should sign the petition so Kickstarter will let you raise money on their site. And also why they should donate if you finally do get approved.
 
BK: Cause fuck Kickstarter. This site is bullshit, and people need to know it. They found a way to profit off of fundraising. It’s like if you wanted to buy a hot dog at a baseball game, and you handed your money down the aisle and a guy in the middle demanded one of your dollars, or he passed all of your money to the hot dog guy, but then took a bite of the hot dog that was passed to you. Kickstarter is just a crummy middle man who only goes to baseball games to steal bites of other people’s hot dogs. But now they’ve tasted some big celebrity hot dogs, and no regular person hot dog is going to satisfy them anymore. Donate if you want to see me drunkenly making fun of weird family photos in a shitty batman mask. Probably I’ll just use one of their competitors sites that don’t take any of your money. But in the mean time, sign the petition so Kickstarter gets an email from change.org just to let them know they’re assholes.
Brendan Kennedy is a Los Angeles comedian who formerly lived in Philadelphia. While here he was a stand-up comedian and member of sketch group Camp Woods and improv group Hate Speech Committee. You can sign his petition to Kickstarter online at change.org.

You Should Call Your Parents: Cait O’Driscoll interviews Steve and Andrea O’Driscoll

photo 1Cait O’Driscoll: Ready, guys?

Andrea O’Driscoll (AKA Mom): Oh, here we go. We’re getting interviewed. I think I need a smoke first. So, you’ll have to wait.

Steve O’Driscoll (AKA Dad): Do I need to leave the room then?

AO: What?

SO: I thought we were doing it separately. I object. I want to do it separately.

AO: I’ll be right back. I have to get stoked for this.

CO: Do you think I’m funny?

(Laughter)

AO: It depends on what day it is.

SO: Monday, Wednesdays, and Saturdays. Not so much on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

CO: All right… That went well. Let’s move on.

AO: It depends on whether I’m being your mom, or going to see you in something.

CO: Was there a moment when I was growing up that you thought, “Hey, this kid might one day think she’s a comedian?”

SO: Yes.

AO: Every night at dinner from the time you were about… Oh, I guess a year… you would wait, everyone would sit at the dinner table, and you would stand up in your high chair and say, “It’s showtime.”

CO: Do you have anything else to add, dad?

SO: Always. Right from the beginning.

AO: Before you were even here, it was a joke. You were one of God’s little jokes. Should we get into that? Do you want to tell that story?

SO: No, don’t.

CO: Explain the Harold.

AO: Harold who? No. I know there’s beats. What do you know about it?

SO: What?

AO: The Harold.

SO: The Harold? I don’t even know what we’re talking about.

AO: The type of improv she does. There’s three sections and so many beats to each section, but I can’t figure it out from watching it. I need a drum to find the beats.

SO: Can I say anything about the other?

AO: Organic’s too noisy.

SO: I like it better than the other.

CO: How do you feel about improv?

AO: I like it. Some’s funnier than others. We can go back into that again…

SO: I think it’s really hard when you have 5 or 6 people on stage not to end up with one or two people who dominate… to be honest.

AO: I still don’t believe that you don’t use stuff that you did in rehearsal. If it’s failing and flailing and you have good stuff that you did in rehearsal. Why not use it?

CO: We don’t.

AO: Well, then I guess I just don’t get the rehearsals. But yeah, I like improv, I come see you all the time. Some nights are funnier than others, just like some days you’re funnier than others. I could have said it depends what side of the bed you woke up on.

CO: Do you have a favorite Davenger moment?

SO: I think there’s been a lot of funny moments. The only thing I can think of pointing to is always your first improv show is the best, because you don’t really know what to expect and it’s better than what you expect it to be. That’s the only way I can put it.

AO: The show where Hilary played Hans and you were in relaxation therapy, but you were afraid of rubber bands and they kept stressing you out with them; that was the therapy. Then you were doing bumper cars and Kevin made you kill a child, and the show ended with Hilary saying, “You’ve been Hans-ed.”

CO: When you brag about me to your friends, what’s the first thing you say? When answering, please remember this is a comedy article that all my funny friends will see (so maybe say something about how hilarious I am).

SO: I don’t know, I just say you’ve been performing on stage since as long as I can remember. What was she 7 or 8? And we’ve always enjoyed…

AO: I was always stunned when she started doing improv because I was always thought she was a drama queen.

SO: Oh no, I think she should do stand up comedy. That’s the natural extension.

AO: I’d always seen her in dramas and the first time I saw her in a role when she was funny, like overtly physically funny, all the physicality, expressions, timing. I was blown away by it. And the role in that play was dumb, so you took it to the absurd, and it was really funny.

CO: What do you think about me performing comedy?

AO: I’d like to see you push it more. You still look to me like you hesitate, and you allow other people to continue when I know there’s something hidden behind your little smile that’s probably funny.

SO: Well, I’ve always liked some of the more physical humor, like Dick Van Dyke, or people that do physical, Jack Tripper, people that do physical comedy. And I remember at the last show I went to, that was the remark I made to Dan the way, out of the blue, he does this contortion with his body. I think that the expressions and the actions are as important as what comes out of your mouth sometimes.

CO: Do you think I should try stand up?

SO: Yes. Absolutely. What are you waiting for?

AO: I think you should because I think you’re a good writer, and I think if you put your mind to it… but sometimes you’re lazy.

SO: A lot of people that do stand up comedy are afraid of the audience. A lot of them. I remember distinctly Johnny Carson was afraid of crowds.

AO: Oh boy, Dad’s gonna give you a history lesson. I think it’s hard for females. A guy can get away with any raw comment, but when a female does it…

CO: What do you think my opening joke should be?

AO: One time at band camp… No.vDon’t say the lawn mower joke, Steve.

SO: No, you don’t do jokes. You do more like something that happened to you on the way to the place… or…

AO: Let me tell you about my mother…? That’s always a good place to start. Here’s to the mothers, it’s their fault.

SO: You could open it with the two girls in diapers.

CO: What?

AO: No idea what you’re talking about.

SO: Dogs in diapers it’s a funny image.

AO: Oh, the girls.

SO: To me part of doing stand up is relating stories about people that you know.

AO: Well, God, you better know funny people than. She’s up shit’s creek then.

CO: Who’s your favorite comedian? Other than me guys, geeze, you’re making me blush!

SO: Uh, so I’m just gonna say you to get it out of the way then. Current comedian? Probably, Lewis Black. I like Seinfeld.

AO: I pick Robin Williams.

AO: Yeah, I like Robin Williams. Tina Fey and Amy Poehler.

SO: Oh yeah, Tina Fey.

CO: Anything else you want to add?

AO: I think you should push it. I think you should pursue it.

SO: You could create a character like um… what’s her name did… SNL… Gilda Radner.

AO: Oh, I know who I love, Gilda Radner’s husband, Gene Wilder.

SO: When you can develop something where you get into character, you can really go with it, rather than standing there and telling jokes, you can be in character.

AO: You do that well. I can see your acting experience. I like when improv has a connection to the acting.

Cait currently improvises with Philly Improv Theater house team Davenger directed by the amazing Maggy Keegan. She can also be seen in improv duos DupliCate and Mr. and Mrs.

If you are a Philadelphia-area comedian who’d like to interview one (or both) of your parents send us an email to contact@witout.net for more information. Go ahead, do it. You should really call your parents more anyways.

You Should Call Your Parents: Jeff Soles Interviews Kitty Soles

In our series, “You Should Call Your Parents,” comedians interview their parents to find out how they feel about their offspring’s pursuit of the stage.

Jeff and Mom

Jeff Soles: Did you ever think I’d become a comedian?

Kitty Soles: No because it’s too scary. Getting up in front of strangers and having to think of jokes real quick. What if they don’t laugh?

JS: Have you seen me bomb?

KS: One time. Down in Philly. I was with Aunt Mary and was like, “They’re not laughing!” when you first started. I wanted to cry. Nobody was laughing. I thought, “Let’s laugh real loud and then they’ll laugh with us.” I wasn’t embarrassed, I was scared for you. My hands were all sweaty.

JS: What was your first reaction when I told you I wanted to do stand up?

KS: I was surprised. I thought you were crazy. You’re so quiet. To get up in front of people you don’t know and try to make them laugh.

JS: Do you think I’ll ever get married and have kids?

KS: Probably not. Cuz you’re too fussy. Too picky. You have to be nice to a girl. And you don’t like to do that for very long. You’d be a good father. But I don’t know about married.

JS: What if I just knocked somebody up and brought home a baby and asked to move back home?

KS: Oooohh. After I got over the shock and went to confession to see the priest (laughs). You know I’d accept your baby because it’s my grandchild. But don’t expect me to raise it. I’m getting too old for that. I’m not taking care of your mess.

JS: What if I start going to NY by myself? To make it?

KS: I know, but it’s better than Philly. I watch the Philly news. I don’t watch the NY news. So I won’t know.

JS: Are you ashamed to tell your friends and family that I do comedy?

KS: No. I love it. They always ask me what jokes you do and what you talk about on stage. I try to do your jokes but I will either forget how it goes or mess it up. Then they just laugh at me. But you were on Comcast on demand and we went to Aunt Anne’s to watch it and I thought she was going to piss her pants laughing. You did a joke making fun of us for watching the lottery and all that and she was laughing because she does the things you were making fun of. She got a kick out of that.

JS: Who do I get my humor from?

KS: I think both sides of your family. Our side always jokes around and laughs and has a good time. Your dad always likes telling jokes. Whenever we visit relatives they always ask him if he heard any new jokes. But he just tells the same jokes that we’ve heard a hundred times. But we still laugh.

JS: Do you remember the first joke I ever told?

KS: Yes you were about 5 or 6 years old. Out of nowhere you came up to me and said, “Have you seen Dolly Parton’s new shoes? …. Neither did she.” And I was in such shock and I was laughing so hard that I couldn’t yell at you. My little baby was telling a dirty joke. That coming out of your innocent mouth was just too funny. You always went around telling people jokes from your little joke book. Your favorite one you told during dinner was, “What do you call a fish with two knees? …. A two-knee fish!” It was cute. We had a good laugh.

Jeff Soles is a Philadelphia-area stand-up comedian and member of sketch comedy group IdRatherBeHere. He can be seen performing at a fundraiser show for CONCERN on Friday, May 17 at the Willow Grove VFW.

If you are a Philadelphia-area comedian who’d like to interview one (or both) of your parents send us an email to contact@witout.net for more information. Go ahead, do it. You should really call your parents more anyways.

You Should Call Your Parents: Kristen Schier Interviews Marilyn Schier

OK, here’s the situation… Anyone familiar with the DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince hit song (or Leslie Knope’s tribute to it in Parks and Recreation) knows that it is generally believed that “parents just don’t understand.”  This can seem especially true for comedians and other people that choose to pursue their interests in the arts. But maybe some of our parents understand us a little more than we may think. In our new series, “You Should Call Your Parents,” comedians will interview their parents to find out how they feel about their offspring’s pursuit of the stage.

Kristen Schier: What did you think when you found out I was performing comedy?

Marilyn Schier: My first thoughts when you said you wanted to perform comedy were: “Gosh, I hope she doesn’t want to move to New York,” closely followed by, “she still needs a ‘real’ job to buy food.”

KS: Are there things you remember about me growing up that explain why I became a comedian. Or is it a total surprise to you?

MS: When you were growing up I knew you were destined for the stage. I remember one time when you and your sister (you were about 3) performed a rain dance on a piano bench for everyone at Doris’ house. Your sister played the piano (not well, she was 4) and you interpreted the music through dance. Then there was the time we were driving back to Emerald Isle from Wilmington, NC and you had me laughing so hard in the car that I missed the turn and ended up on a very dark road in Camp LeJeune with guys dressed in camouflage and carrying M-16’s. I told you not to say another word until we got back to the beach house.

KS: In your own words, explain to me what it is you think I do?

MS: I am pretty sure I know what you do, I am just not sure how you do it or where it came from. Neither your father or I are very funny, but you, my dear, are hysterical. Even when I come down for breakfast or lunch, you usually say something while we are driving around that is either mildly offensive or makes me laugh.

KS: Who are some of your favorite comedians?

MS: Well, I love early Bill Cosby. Lots of those older comedians whose names I can’t remember and they are all probably dead now anyway.

KS: What do you wish I was doing with my life?

MS: My dreams for you have come true. You are doing something that you love doing and that’s the best job in the world. I am, have been, and always will be very proud of you.

Kristen Schier is one half of the Philadelphia-based improv duo The Amie & Kristen Show/The Kristen & Amie Show, as well as a Philly Improv Theater instructor; improv instructor at University of the Arts; director for PHIT House Team ZaoGao; and Artistic Director for the short-form Philadelphia improv group The N Crowd.

If you are a Philadelphia-area comedian who’d like to interview one (or both) of your parents send us an email to contact@witout.net for more information. Go ahead, do it. You should really call your parents more anyways.

“I Just Want to See New Jokes” – Interview with Jess Carpenter of R Open Mic

By: Peter Rambo

I went into Roosevelt’s last Thursday knowing one person and having been in the audience of exactly one open mic before that night.

Before sign-ups were supposed to start, comedians gathered in a small room tucked away in the recesses of the bar, commenting on the handmade curtains and the absent bartender. (She was there by time the mic started.) It didn’t take long for the room to fill, largely because it only holds a handful of people.

Jess Carpenter is one of the five founders of the new weekly event, now named R Open Mic. He wasn’t hosting, so he had plenty of time to talk to me about the mic, which he thinks holds promise, both as a place to debut new material and as a place to film polished stuff.

Peter Rambo: So tell me about this open mic. How did it come about?

Jess Carpenter: Actually, I told Brian that I was looking for a room ’cause, I’m sad to say, I was getting sad going to open mics and seeing the same comics tell the same jokes. So I was telling Brian that I wanted to do a room where we would have a theme, and every week or every two weeks, we could have a list of words or a list of subjects and people could do [jokes inspired by that.] It gives them a reason to write.

So we decided we’re going to do that once a month, and just have the mic as a regular mic [the rest of the time]. He found the room, ’cause he does Quizzo here, and it looked pretty good. It looks small enough. It’s small enough to where it’ll feel full, and the comics can also be out here [in the main room] to talk.  Most comics, after they get off stage, they have that adrenaline going, and you don’t really want them in the mic talking during someone else’s set.

PR: Yeah, you can’t really hear anything [out here]. You can’t hear them in there, and vice versa.

JC: That’s what I like about it. It’s a great little room. We’ll see how it works though.

PR: There’s not a whole lot of seating.

JC: No, 18 people [are on the list] so far, and there’s standing room. And there’s the pole there. That pole is actually a great place–I put the curtains up so you can actually film here, and since it’s a small enough room it’ll always feel like [you're getting nice applause].

PR: Is there a rotating cast of hosts?

JC: Yeah, the third Thursday I won’t be here cause I have my other show.

PR: Comedian Deconstruction?

JC: Right. There’s five of us, so we’re always going to just try and take [turns with] hosting. To be honest, I could care less about hosting. I just want to see new jokes.

I want to see Philly become a hotbed. Boston was a hotbed in the ’90s I think, and that’s where comics were coming out with the new concept of comedy. Why can’t Philly be that?

PR: Do you know the other hosts very well?

JC: Yeah, they actually do B.a. Comedian. Brian and Andrew are B and A, and Tim is the musical part. He does guitar. And Dan and I are literally opposites. He does jokes about being a straight guy that seem really gay, and then I love to follow him ’cause I’m a gay guy who seems really straight. If I make it, he’s going to be my opener. It just works out really well.

It was really nice, because we met at an open mic, we were very-like minded and liked talking after. We liked going outside and talking during the mic while other people were doing their sets. And just going and popping in to see the people we liked. And that’s what so good about this room, you can do that. You can pop in and out.

PR: This mic is really close to the Raven Lounge.  How do you think that’s going to affect the night?

JC: It’s great, ’cause we want to make sure people can get to both. I think it’s like eight or nine minutes to get from one side to the other. Maybe 12 minutes. People can do both. If you can have comics hit multiple mics a night, you can have a comic totally screw up a joke or a set and they can make a note and try that set 15 or 20 minutes later, versus waiting a week or two weeks to try it again.

And this is a bar, they’re fine with staying open, so people can either go here early and go there late, or vice versa.

PR: When’s the first theme open mic?

JC: The second Thursday of the month.

Dan King: We’ll give ourselves two weeks to do it, and then on the second one …

JC: Yeah, so on the first Thursday, we’ll come up with five different subject matters, and then the second Thursday, that’s when they can do jokes. You don’t have to, but you can choose to. I think we’ll go out of a hat, so people can put suggestions in. We pull five because we don’t want a bunch of comics feeling that they just wrote the same joke another comic wrote, but it shows that there’s less stealing than people think. There’s a lot of ideas floating out there that people just grab.

It’s funny because, Jerry Corley, who’s one of my favorite comedy coaches out there, says every day, just write stuff from the newspaper, even if you’re never going to use it, but if you write a good enough one and you’re watching TV and you see it, you know you’re on the right track.You see a lot of that on Twitter.

I see Chip [Chantry] doing a lot of that. I like the way Chip tweets, ’cause he makes it condensed. Brevity is everything when it comes to comedy.

PR: Do you have any words of wisdom for someone who’s just starting? Like at this open mic? Like me?

JC: Respect the light. Always respect the light. Always thank people. It sounds corny, but they remember you. You’re going to meet more comics at open mics that are going to get you work, than you’re going to meet by calling people. If you like another comic’s stuff, tell them, “That’s a great joke.” Don’t offer advice out of nowhere. It could be good advice, but some comics can’t take advice. But if they ask, tell them.

Oh, rule number one. Rule number one. Don’t say “good set” if it wasn’t a good set. Don’t say anything. But don’t say “good set.” If someone had a shitty set, and they walk off stage, do not say “good set.” They know they had a shitty set. But if they had a good set, and you said “good set,” but you never said good set or shitty set [before], they know that you meant it. “Good try,” say that, but don’t say “good set.”

PR: It sounds a little patronizing.

JC: Yeah, you don’t want to sound patronizing. But you’ll see it, trust me, you’ll see it. Actually, watch. [Turns to Hillary Rea] Hey, do you hate when someone says good set and you had a shitty set?

Hillary Rea: I don’t tell people that if I didn’t like it. I just run away or walk away. And if I feel like I did shitty, it’s just … Irish Goodbye.

JC: See! Ah, it’s horrible. ‘Cause, your tail’s already between your legs, and someone says good set and you’re like …

PR: Were you there?

JC: Were you just there? I’m bleeding here.

PR: Do you use open mics to farm talent for other shows?

JC: I’ve been starting to do virgin comics at Comedian Deconstruction. I might take an opener from here and bring them over there. I think what I might start doing is one of the five things that we pull out of the hat, I might make one of those one of the themes we do at Deconstruction that month. If it works here, it gives me a week to put them on the show. I think that could work. If I have a theme and someone does a really good joke about it, and they have three or four minutes to follow it with, why not give them a real show to play with. There’s nothing better than that feeling of being in a show. It’s like, real claps, you know? Better than a bringer.

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I got on stage for the first time as a stand-up and told six jokes in less than three minutes. The crowd laughed, probably because they knew it was my first time, and I felt good. I’ll try not to exit on that high note.

R Open Mic happens every Thursday at Roosevelt’s at the corner of 22nd and Walnut. Sign-ups are at 7:30pm and the show starts at 8pm.

Peter Rambo is @gunnarrambo and is part of American Breakfast. They receive likes at facebook.com/americanbfast.

This Little Dysfunctional Family: Interview with H. Foley of Center City Comedy

Tonight, Center City Comedy at The Raven Lounge is celebrating its fourth anniversary. The open mic has consistently provided a full room for comedians to work on their acts and test new material in front of always-eager crowds. The spot has earned a reputation from out-of-town acts visiting Philly as a place to hang out with local comics, or even get a late-night set in after their shows. The Center City Comedy crew (Chris Cotton, Conrad Roth, H. Foley, Tom Cassidy, Ryan Shaner, Kevin Ryan, Chris Whitehair) have branched out to working on producing online video content (Babe Ruth Time Traveller, We Rent). We asked H. Foley, one of the early members of Center City Comedy, some questions about the past four years, and the future.

WITOUT: At a time when open mics come and go within a few months, you have kept Center City Comedy at The Raven Lounge alive and kicking for four years – what do you think are the keys to your success?

H. FOLEY: Well, we always put the audience first. We promoted the show as much as possible and we were very lucky to be surrounded by so many talented comedians. It was really built on a lot of hard work and dedication, not just from us but the community as a whole.

WO: What are some of your favorite moments from the open mic over the past four years?

HF: I asked the boys this question, and everyone said all the anniversary shows really stuck out in their minds. Plus, the night Patrice O’Neal came by, and the night we had to pull Conrad from hosting because he got so wasted and took his balls out.

WO: Do you think Center City Comedy has had an influence on the Philly comedy scene? How do you think you’ve left your mark?

HF: That is a tough question. I hope so, but you would have to ask the comedy community that. It was never our intention though. We just wanted to create an environment where the city could see how funny the Philly comedy community is, and it worked because it is.

WO: You’ve passed the hosting duties of the weekly mic down to new groups of comics a few times – how do you decide who you’d like to take over as hosts and when do you feel like it’s time to bring in new blood.

HF: We look at who is working hard, and who really wants it, and who we think would fit into this little dysfunctional family. Right now Ryan Shaner is in charge, and we recently brought Kevin Ryan into the mix, and it is really working out. Tom Cassidy has ran it for the last year and did a great job. Tom has been a big part of our group, and he is someone I love and consider to be a part of our family.

WO: How did you transition from hosting open mics and shows around the city to producing comedy videos for the web?

HF: It was always our plan, we were never just about running an open mic. We know what we want to do and just keep taking steps to make it happen. We now film all the time and are writing scripts and trying to just keep moving forward.

WO: Since the show has started, some of you have moved to other cities, but have stayed loyal to your roots, what keeps you coming back to Philly for more?

HF: I mean that is what it is all about, remembering who we are and where we are from. We love Philly, and realize how lucky we are to be a part of the Philly scene.

WO: What’s next for Center City Comedy?

HF: We just want to keep working hard and chasing our dreams. I do want to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has performed with us over the last four years, and especially want to thank Alex Gross of Superdps.com who is helping us to take the next step. I also want to wish you, and all of our friends who have the heart to push to the next level, the very best of luck.

The Center City Comedy Four Year Anniversary Show is tonight, at 9:00pm, at The Raven Lounge (1718 Sansom St. Philadelphia).