Upcoming Shows

  • October 22, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 23, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 23, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 24, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 24, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 24, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 24, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 24, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 24, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 25, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 25, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Heliun
  • October 25, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 25, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 25, 2014 9:00 pmComedy Train Rek presents Awkward Sex and the City
  • October 25, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 25, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 25, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • October 29, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 30, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 30, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 31, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 31, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
AEC v1.0.4

Check This Out: Figment Theater’s “A Series of Dangerous Fools” @ Vox Populi

FB-Event_Series-of-Dangerous-Fools We just added two shows to the calendar for Thursday and Saturday. The last nights of a run of shows called A Series of Dangerous Fools features improv from Thomas Fowler & Mary Carpenter, with special guests. Produced by Figment Theater and running at the Vox Populi gallery on 11th Street between Vine and Callowhill, Fools is $5 bucks at the door and has different featured improvisers each night.

On Thursday night, check out The Chain w/ Erin Pitts (Pitts invites a fellow improviser to play, who in turn invites another, initiating a chain of invites creating a one-night-only ensemble) and Slasher Sorority (sorority sisters Cait O’Driscoll, Corin Wells, Kate Banford, Kristen Schier & Kristin Finger are stalked by mysterious killers Joel Sumner & Thomas Fowler).

On Saturday, it’s John Hughes High Minisode 1 (the fictional world of John Hughes High is explored when Lucy [Kristin Finger] and Principal Hines [Kevin Regan] meet with an admissions recruiter from OSU [Thomas Fowler]), John Hughes High Minisode 2 – (Ox [Frank Farrell] and his father [Thomas Fowler] sit down for a meeting with Coach [Eoin O’Shea] to discuss some worrisome poetry that’s been uncovered), Fowler-Roney-O’Shea – (Thomas Fowler, Steve Roney & Eoin O’Shea unite for a special one-night-only set), and Origin Story – (Alli Soowal, Brian Ratcliffe, Eoin O’Shea, Joe Sabatino, Kelly Jennings, Kristin Finger, Mary Carpenter and Steve Roney and Thomas Fowler trace the origin of how a superhero is born).

For the Love of the Duo: A Tribute to Duofest (June 6-9)

by Kristen Schier

Roughly four years ago an idea was dreamed up by me and my best friend and duo partner Amie Roe that found not only tremendous support but a home with the Philly Improv Theater. This year Duofest has talent coming from Austin, LA, Vancouver, Toronto, DC, London, Detroit, Boston, NYC and also SCOTT ADSIT! It has grown to be a truly exciting international event and I am proud that its home is in Philadelphia.

You might wonder what is so wonderful about improv duos that we need to go ahead and make a whole festival about it.

First, I think most duos may experience difficulty getting into festivals. It is often the case that some festivals have performer fees attached to participation that sometimes skew there taste towards, well, groups with more performers. We wanted to give duos a place to play.

Second, a duo is an amazing way to power-boost your improv skillz and work your improv muscles. When Duofest first started there were only a handful of two-person teams to speak of in Philly.  It makes my heart happy that a ton of duos have since formed because it can put improvisers on a fast-track to growth and maturation. A small part of this is that when there are only two of you to wrangle you find that organizing rehearsals and shows is easier, and by virtue of that you find yourself practicing and playing more than you might if you had to rally a larger team. Furthermore, in a duo you learn very quickly that you are not just onstage all the time, you are also in every scene. Talk about scene reps, man o man. You learn by duo-ing. Ha.

A two-person show also forces you to recognize and refine your style as an improviser.

First, there is the task of choosing who you’re going to play with. When selecting a partner you probably consider folks whose work you admire. That requires a certain level of understanding and reflection. In addition to determining on a partner, you also are 50 percent of every show. Having far more responsibility and influence over the direction of a show exposes what you bring to the table. Gaining that type of insight can be invaluable to one’s evolution.

Let’s take a moment and say that even deciding to form a duo in the first place takes balls.  You’re all like “We can make up a show on the spot that will be worth seeing, just me and my friend.” Yeah, that is undeniably ballsy— and a big part of improvising is, well, having the balls, or tubes (holla atcha ladies) to step out there in the first place.

Thirdly, a duo exemplifies key elements of improvisation—collaboration and, of course, the two-person scene.  The boundlessness of what you can create as an improviser never ceases to amaze me. It is part of the magic of live performance. This really comes to the forefront in a duo in a way that is different from team, or even solo performance. It has some of the “limitations” that give a thrill to solo performance while maintaining the collaborative element that makes a larger team so enjoyable to play on. In short, you can do anything a larger improv team can do with fewer people and all while having a more intimate feel to your creative process. In this way the duo embodies trust and challenges the possible.

Besides all that, at the heart of all good improv shows is one thing: the two-person scene.  No matter what the form, the playing style, the philosophy – if you can do an amazing two-person scene, you have got me hooked.  I don’t care what you call it; every improv form is like a showcase for a great two-person scene. A form is a house for funny engaging dynamic two-person scenes to live in. A great duo is the necessary, or a most essential version of this house. In that way a great duo is like a great poem. There is only what you need, but there is everything you need.

Duofest is June 6th-9th at The Shubin Theatre (407 Bainbridge Street). Click here for tickets for individual shows in Duofest 2013 and here for Weekend All-Access Passes.

Discussing a Bit with Matt Holmes – The Secret to Improv

by Matt Holmes

I learned improv in a way that wasn’t helpful for me logically or in the moment. Eventually, I boiled it down to a simple, underlying 3-step process.

How to Answer
The first lesson I learned for improv was “Yes And.” You agree (saying Yes) and add (starting with And). This made sense; you can’t waste time arguing about invisible stuff, and you can’t have a scene without moving forward.
 
This had some problems, though. The theory was all about responding. This was step two. What do you do first? I, and my partner, needed something to agree with. Plus, it was so verbal. We were just standing there talking and agreeing. 
 
Also, this led to a lot of concern and pressure about being agreeable. I was worried that I might be doing it wrong; it almost felt like I was a bad person or “didn’t play well with others.” 
 
Saying “Yes And” to everything and anything led to a lot of starts that didn’t go anywhere and tangents that either derailed or fizzled out. 
 
Accepting the facts of the situation is important, but I wanted to know how to begin, and I wanted to get somewhere with it. 
 
First What to Say
Then I learned to get the Who, What, and Where in the first three lines, including names and relationships and a kernel of conflict. This made sense, too. It was a checklist, a to-do list.
 
The problem for me was the pressure of getting all those details right away. Plus, the end result was a lot of awkward exposition, and I still wasn’t sure what to do next. 
 
It felt like the whole scene was puked out in the first three lines and I was still stranded, but now with a lot of facts nobody cared about. A lot of the information seemed unimportant, too. Sometimes, the location doesn’t really matter. Sometimes, it doesn’t really matter whether you’re playing sisters or just best friends.
 
I went from “What do I do?” to “What do I do now that we’re twin pirates at the DMV?” 
 
Thinking about Playing
Then I learned “Finding the Game.” How you find it and what exactly a game is were both a bit mysterious. 
 
Jumping on the first unusual thing that happened and asking, “If this is true, what else is also true?” worked and led to some really clear-cut scenes. It was almost like sketch comedy that we made up on the spot. 
 
I had something for the scene to be about and stuff to do based on that premise. I learned that plot was bad and game was good, because plot got people “in their heads.” 
 
The only problem was that I still got stuck in my head thinking about what was also true and what to do next; only now I was confused by the mystic nature of the theory. Plus, I found that every scene was about an usual thing. 
 
It still felt like scenes worked just by luck. I knew what a game was and why to play it, but it was always a challenge to create the rules and play them. 
 
What’s my Motivation?
Then I learned about some real acting. I tried to give my characters a “deal” or a “want” and figure out what my partners were giving their characters. I tried to play real people with back stories and core characteristics.  
 
It was confusing. I was thinking too much. In improv, there’s no time for secrets, especially ones that never get divulged. 
 
This might be helpful for working with a script or improvising to develop one, but if your technique in every improv scene is focused on a want, then that’s what every scene will be about. It’s a good exercise, but it’s not a technique to use every time.
 
So what do you do to do it?
I boiled down all these elements into three simple steps that I could follow.
 
  • 1. Do something.
 

It doesn’t matter what. You can choose to be witty or physical or emotional. You can come up with an idea or just be a character. You can purposefully decide specifics or let them emerge later.You, and your partner, and the audience all just need

something.Start the scene and keep it going. It’s okay if it feels vague and uncertain. The audience doesn’t need every detail right away, and they’re more patient than you’d think.

 
  • 2. Do it more.
 
In improv, you start with a blank slate and draw in some details. When we all have some idea of what’s going on, then we just want to invest in it and get something back. 
 
If you start over or shift gears, it’s like reading the first page from a few different books instead of getting through one story. 
 
  • 3. Do it bigger.
 
Even when something is working and making sense and getting laughs, it needs to go somewhere. Comedy is built on surprise. You can stay on track, but change it up a bit. Grab people by doing what you’re already doing, but bigger in some way.  Go to the Nth degree with whatever it is. 
 
Improv can be trivial and ephemeral. Part of the show, even a really good one, is the aspect that it’s being made up in the moment. You give improv a point and a purpose by picking out something to explore and use.
 
  • Imagine if Beethoven only did one “dah-dah da-DAH!” You’d want more.
  • Imagine if he did it exactly the same way ten times. You’d want it a little different, bigger, softer, played on a flute; not exactly repeated again and again.

3 is Funny, Conclusive, & Ingrained

“Omne trium perfectum” means every set of three is complete. In comedy, we just say that things are funny in threes: the rule of three. Thrice is nice.Two is the smallest number of points needed to establish a pattern with an expectation to follow. Doing something more and then “bigger” satisfies that expectation while still being some kind of surprise.
 
This is the ‘how.’ The ‘what’ is up to you.
You can follow this technique at any level, no matter who your partners are, no matter your energy level or mood, and it’ll work.
These are the underlying basics. Everything else is personal taste and preference. You can still “Yes, And.” You can still find the game. You can play real or clever or silly or whatever you like, but you can do it with a plan for how.
 

What you choose to play becomes the game, without having to think about it. You don’t have to find something or hope for anything. You can actively create, just by repeating any choice.Any details missing from the scene aren’t necessary or can be added in later as clarification or a reveal.

Sometimes, you don’t need stakes or emotions or a setting or names, so long as something else is strong enough to fill that void.Sometimes, improvisers patiently explore, listen, agree, and add until they get a good idea. Then, on that good laugh, they edit and start over, grasping at straws again. It’s so much easier to make the first thing that happens into something great and stick with it. There’s less dead air, less to keep track of, and fewer dead ends.

 
In a story, the plot is created by having characters do something more and bigger. In a game, the moves are repeated (done more) and heightened (done bigger). Even when a scene or sketch takes a turn, that’s just something else that’ll be done more and bigger also. 
 

In improv, you might only see pieces of a larger narrative. If the show doesn’t complete a traditional structure, wrapping up a climax and resolution, the audience won’t care too much, as long as the pieces they saw were good. By repeating and heightening something, you create the slices of a larger pie.Plot asks, “What happens next?” Game asks, “If this is true, what else is true?” Deal asks “Who are these characters, what do they want, and how do they try to get it?” I think this 3-step framework answers all these questions in a pragmatic, practical way so improvisers can relax and play.

 
You’re not lost; you have a map. Take a step in any direction and keep going.

Matt Holmes is an improviser in Philly. He performs a full improv comedy set with a complete stranger from the audience in Matt& (“playful and winning” –TimeOut Chicago). He also teaches improv, coaches improv groups, and co-founded Rare Bird Show (“Top Shelf Improv” –The Apiary, “arguably the best improv group Philly has ever produced” –AV Club).

Look for the next installment of “Discussing a Bit,” Matt’s monthly WitOut column, on June 1st.

Have a comedy issue or theory you’d like Matt to examine? Email alison@witout.net.

2013 Troika Tournament Champions: Law and Order: LOL

The seventh annual Troika Tournament, presented by Figment Theater in partnership with The Sideshow came to a conclusion this Saturday with Law and Order: LOL (Alex Newman, Andrew Stanton, and Nicole Labrecque) taking home the title, along with a cash prize. The group performed a show with scenes and characters stylized after the popular television franchise including detectives, assistant district attorneys and CSI personnel.

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The group bested efforts from Round One winners Improv Against Humanity (Alli Soowal, JP Boudwin, and Kevin Pettit) and Round Two champs Craft (Jason Grimley, Marc Reber, and Sue Jay)

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If you have any Philly comedy news for us to mention – send it our way with an email to contact@witout.net

Interview with B.J. Ellis re: 8 Years of The N Crowd

The N Crowd is turning 8 this year, and to celebrate they’re throwing a special anniversary show and party at Ruba Club this Friday.  Read on for more details and reflections on the Crowd’s history from Executive Director B.J. Ellis.

WitOut: How did The N Crowd form?

B.J. Ellis: The N Crowd was formed after a pair of auditions held by Ray Reese and Emily Dufton in February of 2005. Mike Connor, Jessica Snow, Brandon Libby and myself were the original cast from that audition.

WO: How has the group evolved over the years?

BJE: The group has evolved in a few ways over the years. Many changes were behind the scenes. As we all gained more experience over the years and as technology changed, we found easier ways to make the show run smoother. For example, the way we sell tickets went from cash-only that week to the ability to order tickets for shows 3 month out.. I honestly can’t imagine running the show now without the benefits of technology we now use. Our show is also way funnier now than it was in 2005. We came across some old archive footage of one of our first shows. After watching it I thought to myself, “Whoa…that… isn’t…very funny. Yeesh.” I feel that the quality of our shows has really evolved. The cast has also changed a lot over the years. I believe over the 8 years nearly 40 people have been in The N Crowd.

WO: What are some of your favorite moments in N Crowd history?

BJE: That is truly a tough question to answer. I enjoy just about every week I am here. My favorite moment nowadays is coming in on a Friday and knowing we have a sold out show. In the early years of The N Crowd, we would have weeks that no one came to the show. Today…I honestly couldn’t say when the last time that happened.

WO: Do you have any new goals or plans for the N Crowd as the group enters its 8th year?

BJE: A few goals, a couple of plans. Maybe a hair-brained scheme or two.

WO: What can fans expect from the anniversary show this Friday?

BJE: We are going to be at The Ruba for our anniversary show this year. Unlike our usual shows, this venue has a cash bar. We also will have some pizza there for consumption and after the show there will be dancing. The show starts at 8:30 pm, which is alittle later then usual, just in case anyone goes to The Actors Center [our typical home] accidentally.

The N Crowd 8-Year Anniversary Show is this Friday, April 26th at Ruba Club (414 Green Street). Tickets are $12, which includes the after-party.

“Improppeteers!” – Interview with Joe Sabatino and Kelly Vrooman of Friends of Alcatraz

On the last Friday of every month, ComedySportz is bringing in original outside acts for their 8PM time slot, ahead of their 10PM adults-only The Blue Show.  This month, ComedySportz Presents runs on two bonus days—Wednesday and Thursday—and features Friends of Alcatraz, an improvised puppet show.  Here are cast members Joe Sabatino and Kelly Vrooman with details on the history of the group, the format of their show, and what it’s like to play with puppets:

WitOut: Can you give a brief history of Friends of Alcatraz? What sparked your interest in combining improv and puppetry?

Joe Sabatino: I’ve been making puppets since I was a kid, and I was always too  nervous to actually put them on display or admit to anyone that I like puppets.  But when Kelly and I started dating…

Kelly Vrooman: By the way, we’re dating.

JS:  When we first started, I knew we shared a common interest in puppets.  So, I decided to do the creepiest thing for someone you’ve only been dating for a month and I built a puppet of Kelly’s cat Alcatraz.  With it came the idea to do an improvised puppet show called Friends of Alcatraz.

KV: It was a weird yet endearing gesture…but mostly weird. He put the puppet in my arms and said, “I was thinking, um, maybe… you would want to create an improv puppet show with me?”  I reluctantly  said yes.

JS: We gathered a group of our funniest friends, that happen to also be some of the best puppeteers in the city: Dave Jadico, Jason Stockdale and Rob Cutler.  It  was a fascinating group of inventive people that know how to make a puppet come alive.  Thus, FoA was born.

KV: I work with puppets on TV, so I knew I wanted to have monitors for the puppeteers, which led us to want a screen the audience could watch. Once the “impropputeers” (a mind-blowingly awesome name I made up) got used to working with the monitors, the show took off. We took it to the next level by adding an a capella opening number and musical edits (Music by Liz Filios, Lyrics by Kelly and Joe).  Oh, and Joe designed and made a ton of incredible puppets for us to use.  That should probably be mentioned.

WO: What would you say are some of the key differences/challenges between regular improvising and improvising with a puppet?

JS: I think the world is even more infinite than human improv.  The things puppets can do is borderline scary in terms of bringing imagination to life.  Especially the way we present our show.  The puppets can literally do anything we want them to do:  fly, twist into a pretzel, enter the scene from the side of another puppet’s head, eat another puppet whole, be as big as a building… The possibilities are endless and with a camera it makes the execution of these things more real.  Because of all of these different elements to play with our minds need to be a clean slate away from reality, almost.  We still play grounded scenes but our “If this, then what” mentality is stretched.  One or two people have questioned this project in terms of legit scene work because we never interact or make eye contact with our scene partners.  When in reality it’s the exact opposite.  We are in tune with one another, watching every single nuance of the puppets and reading the body language of our human scene partners.  It’s also easier because we, the puppeteers, have monitors we are watching which is the same image as the projection the audience is watching.  This makes it MUCH easier to really know what is going on all around the puppets, and helps us create a scene that not only makes sense, but also looks good in terms of staging, spacing and scene action.  Plus… your arm gets tired.

KV: Well put Joe!  In addition, improvising with puppets is one thing, improvising with puppets for the camera is another thing.  And doing it well, is yet another thing! It’s kind of like singing and dancing while acting and juggling.  A bunch of skills have to come together for it to be good.  Sometimes a great improviser can put on a puppet and feel restricted.  Sometimes, an inexperienced improviser can put on a puppet and become great.

WO: What’s the origin story of Alcatraz the Cat, the star of the show?

JS: Kelly knows how the cat got his name and what not, but I’ve always felt like Alcatraz the real cat is a little bit of a dick.  I’ve NEVER been a cat guy.  In fact I’m comfortable to say that before I started hanging around Kelly’s cat I hated cats.  But Alcatraz always fascinated me.  The defining moment for me was when I made a delicious dinner, one night. I dressed the plate nicely, set the mood and it smelled wonderful.  I locked eyes with Alcatraz and he walked over to where I was sitting and eating, which was all the way on the other side of the room.  He slowly walked over, climbed into my lap and put his asshole right into my food.  He got up and walked away.  He made a statement.  So, I made a puppet of him.

KV: I adopted him off the street and held a naming competition with my family.  My sister was in the lead with “The Great Catsby” or “AlCATraz”.  Then, that night, the cat escaped out my second story window and got wedged in the bars of the first story window.  Therefore…Alcatraz won.  I really wanted Joe to perform Alcatraz the puppet because I heard Alcatraz’s voice in my head as a deep man’s voice, but Joe insisted I was the person who should do it.  I reluctantly gave in.   He ended up with an ambiguous European accent that hurts my throat to perform, but it’s worth it. We started to joke around about Alcatraz being a sophisticated world traveler, incredibly popular with everyone he meets, the most desired cat in the world.   And if he’s that amazing, he’d totally be able to gather a group of weirdos he’s met on his travels and convince them to perform in a show, right?  We discovered that he shouldn’t even perform in the show because he’s too much of a character to be able to pretend to be anyone else in a scene.  So, he introduces the show, the cast of characters and gets the suggestion.

WO: Can you give some details on the format and staging of the show?

KV: Friends of Alcatraz is a long form improvised puppet show.  We don’t stick to a rigid format, but we look to play out several scenes then see how those stories intersect.  And spice it up with a happy dose of randomness and frivolous puppet-y fun.

One side of the stage is the “show”—a projected image of the puppets’ world.  It’s like watching a puppet TV show.  The other side of the stage is the behind-the-scenes creation of that show.  You can watch the finished product projected on the screen while you simultaneously watch the puppeteers create the show.

JS: Our format is very catering to the puppeteers/improvisers.

KV: Impropputeers!

JS:  It was important for me that the presence of our powerhouse improvisers didn’t get upstaged by a big screen. People love to see improvisers’ minds work and the audience rarely gets to see what it’s like beneath the camera of a puppet show.  We’ve really nailed it on the head in terms of being able to allow the audience to split focus.  It’s great to be able to see all the work that goes into the projected image on the screen: shuffling around getting the right puppet, making a prop for a puppet to use, someone helping one puppeteer manipulate their puppet so it can do something specific…etc.  Plus we are a great group of people who are really good at making each other laugh, so the audience gets to see how much fun we are having.  It was important to me to really showcase the humans.  It’s an experience to see our show.  It’s almost like seeing five shows at once: a puppet show, a TV show, an improv show, a blooper reel and a musical.

KV: That should be our tagline.

WO: What can audiences expect from your upcoming ComedySportz Presents run of shows?

JS: They will see a group of people stretching themselves between skill sets that are difficult, yet work harmoniously with each other.  We’ve found a system that works and we will keep perfecting it.

KV:  This run, we have some new improvisors (Rachel Whitworth and Caitlin Weigel) who are a GREAT addition to our cast, new AMAZING puppets, and maybe Alcatraz will dance this time.

Catch Friends of Alcatraz at ComedySportz (2030 Sansom Street) this Wednesday-Friday (April 24th-26th) at 8pm. Tickets are $12.

Meet Your Nominees for the 2013 WitOut Awards: Best Improv Group

It’s almost time for the 2013 WitOut Awards for Philadelphia Comedy!  As we get closer to the show, we’ll be rolling out a series of posts to help you get more acquainted with this year’s nominees. Read all about ‘em, and then be sure to get your tickets for the big event on January 13th at World Cafe Live!

The nominees for Best Improv Group are:

Davenger
A mix of improv veterans and fresh faces, Philly Improv Theater House Team Davenger likes its improv lean and gamey. Performing the classic Harold format, they attack the stage with emotion, intellect, and a strong sense of mischief.

Director:
Maggy Keegan

Cast:
Dan Corkery
Hilary Kissinger
Nicholas Mirra
Alex Newman
Cait O’Driscoll
Kevin Pettit
Jessica Snow
Max Sittenfield
Brian Rumble

The Amie & Kristen Show/Kristen & Amie Show
Best friends, total babes, and improvisers Amie Roe and Kristen Schier perform an organic and fluid improv comedy show that’s been featured in theater festivals throughout the United States and Canada (eh!). These West Philadelphia natives deliver improvised comedy that is part best girlfriend, part social commentary, and mostly id.

Cast:
Kristen Schier
Amie Roe

Asteroid!
Asteroid! are the nerdy-sexy Philly Improv Theater House Team who perform the grand-daddy of all improv forms: The Harold. Aided by their great hair, pop-culture references, and excellent fashion sense, they create aerobic, quick-paced shows where you’re all but guaranteed to see a funeral–or at least a death–and one terrible celebrity impression.

Director:
Mike Marbach

Cast:
Bert Archer
Luke Field
AJ Horan
Brent Knobloch
Lora Magaldi
Jessica Ross
Aaron Unice
Caitlin Weigel

Kait & Andrew
Kait and Andrew have been performing improv comedy together as a duo since the first Duofest in 2010, when they performed a premise-based show called Mr. and Mrs. After discovering how well they worked together, they decided to carry on as a two-person team under the much simpler, way less imaganative moniker, Kait & Andrew.

Cast:
Kaitlin Thompson
Andrew Stanton

Hey Rube
Hey Rube is a PHIT House Team. They take one word from the audience as inspiration for a flurry of improvised craziness. Formed in 2011, Hey Rube appeared in the NYC Improv Festival and 2012 Del Close Marathon, was a Philadelphia Weekly Pick, and won last year’s WitOut Award for Best New Group.

Director:
Matt Holmes

Cast:
Aaron Hertzog
Alex Gross
Dennis Trafny
Jen Curcio
Lizzie Spellman
Mark Leopold
Rob Cutler
Tara Demmy

Polygon Comedy: Holiday Explosion!

Description: We’re buckling up for the end of the world with some of the funniest acts around during our December Polygon show: Holiday Explosion!

This month’s lineup:
Jake Alvarez (Stand-Up)
Angry People Building Things (Improv)
Rosen and Milkshake (Improv)
ManiPedi (Sketch)

Hosted by the one and only Joe Gates!

Style: Stand-up, Sketch, Improv

Date: Tuesday, December 11th

Time: Doors: 7:30pm
Show Begins: 8pm (prompt)

Admission: $5 at the door

Location: L’Etage (Above Beau Monde)
624 South 6th Street
Philly, PA

Contact: For more information, visit: http://polygoncomedy.com/ or https://www.facebook.com/events/452068454839768/
Are you an independent comedian in Philly? Looking to perform? Stand-up, improv, sketch and storytellers; we support ‘em all. “Like” us on our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/PolygonComedy), follow us on Twitter (@PolygonComedy), and send us a line atpolygoncomedy@gmail.com for more info on how you can be a part of our upcoming shows!

Comedy Around the Web, Vol. 12

Splitsider talked to some prominent improvisers about the concept of game.

In this clip from The BS Report Bill Simmons interviews Bill Hader about his SNL character Stefon.

Here is an animated Thanksgiving special that Larry David wrote for Funny or Die.

Laughspin thought it was important to share this open letter to Paul F. Tompkins that was originally posted on Reddit, and so do we.

Conan O’Brien interviewed Judd Apatow (for a whole hour) for his internet project Serious Jibber-Jabber.

In this interview with Splitsider Kyle Kinane talks about his early days as a stand-up in Chicago, his upcoming hour special (which premieres November 24 — watch preview clips here), and more.

Comedian Rory Scovel has a new television deal with ABC and Laughspin would like to tell us why that makes perfect sense.

Improvising Tragedy – What Happens When a Comedy Show Gets Surprisingly Intimate?

Last Saturday, I encountered an improv show that radically expanded what I believe the form is capable of.

At the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in Chelsea, New York, an improv team called Grandma’s Ashes has a Saturday night show titled Grandma’s Ashes Gets Dark. In lieu of getting a one-word suggestion for inspiration, the team invites an audience member to share the story of the worst moment of his or her life.

That’s right. Grandma’s Ashes starts its improv comedy show by asking the audience to think of the most painful thing that’s ever happened to them.

While asking for volunteers, an improviser offers up some past stories as examples—somebody nearly severing her leg in an accident and calling her dad thinking that she might be telling him she loved him for the last time, a person who lost his job, got kicked out of his apartment, and found out his mom died—and the examples are extreme, but have a certain, could-have-happened-in-a-movie quality, a survived-the-storm distance that allows us to laugh.

A young woman volunteers, and improviser Abra Tabak sits down with her for the interview, asking what moment in her life she’d like to talk about. The woman takes a breath and answers:

“It’s when I realized that my dad had been raping my sister for 18 years… and then I remembered that it had happened to me too.”

 

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