Upcoming Shows

  • October 30, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 30, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 31, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 31, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 31, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 1, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Heliun
  • November 1, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • November 1, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • November 1, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • November 1, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • November 1, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • November 1, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • November 5, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • November 6, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 6, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • November 7, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • November 7, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • November 7, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • November 7, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • November 7, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 7, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 8, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
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Tweets of the Week, Vol. 27

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Philly Comedy Round-up, Vol. 83

Doogie Horner has been on a tear recently writing funny content for Philebrity. Check out the comedian’s most recent work in which he shares things he Overheard at the Trocadero’s Screening of The Muppets Take Manhattan.

After hearing the news that Washington Nationals baseball player Bryce Harper received a “free burritos for life” card from Chipotle, Philadelphia comedian Pat Barker wrote an open letter to his favorite Mexican fast food restaurant. Then he got a response from them.

Submissions for the first annual District Improv Festival, taking place in Washington D.C. from September 26-29 are now open. Cost to submit is $15 until April 15, and $20 until the deadline of May 1.

Philly Improv Theater has announced the lineup for their first “Sweeps Week”; a week-long competition between shows vying to win a longer run at the theater.

Next week’s Free Improv at Connie’s Ric Rac will still be free, but will be a fundraiser for improv group Safe Weird (Rob Gentile, Andrew Stanton, Kait Thompson) for a trip to London to perform and teach improv workshops across the pond.

Here’s a reminder that submissions for the F. Harold Comedy Festival are now open. This year’s festival will take place from June 11 through June 16 at Studio 5 at the Walnut St. Theatre and will feature improv, sketch, stand-up, and storytelling.

Philly Improv Theater begins their two-week-run of improv, sketch, and variety comedy shows at the Shubin Theatre tomorrow night. You can see their full schedule and purchase tickets in advance online.

This Tuesday Comedy Bonfire is going down (that’s the only way to properly describe it) at The Fire (412 E. Girard Ave.). The night will begin at 8:00pm with a stand-up comedy showcase hosted by Alex Grubard and featuring Mary Radzinski, Ryan Shaner, and Dave Topor. Next, the Trailer Trash Live Podcast at 9:30pm hosted by Michael Baurer and Garrett Smith featuring guests Joey Dougherty and Tommy Touhill. Finally, at 11pm the night will be capped with an open mic hosted by Lou Misiano.

The Cast of Impractical Jokers will be performing two shows Tuesday night at Helium Comedy Club at 7:30 and 9:45. Side note for comedians: Helium’s Open Mic will be held on Wednesday at 8:00pm.

The Not Just Comedy Show returns to The Grape Room this Tuesday for a show featuring comedy from: Mike Renzi, Rick Juliani, Frank Gensano, Nick Kupsey, Jay West, Beirdo, and Bed Savage with musical guest Dave Marley.

Improv group Beirdo will be holding a fundraiser show at The Arts Parlor this Friday to raise money for their trip to the Chicago Improv Festival. The show will feature performances from: Alex Pearlman, The Stonewall Players, Bad James, Cake Bear, Brendan Keegan, and the Beirdos themselves.

We Can All Change returns to O’Neal’s this Friday for a stand-up showcase featuring Chip Chantry, Rachel Fogletto, Bobby Lorello, and Chris Wood.

This Friday is another in the series of ComedySportz Presents shows. This week will feature improv groups Till Death Do Us Part, and Wisdom Teeth. ComedySportz presents will be followed by their monthly not-for-kids The Blue Show at 10:00pm. Tickets can be purchased online.

You can also catch Comedy Night at the Ballroom (Robinson’s Ballroom – 5749 N. Broad St.) this Friday for a night of comedy from: Denny Live, Jay West, Chitta Chatta, Ryan Phillips, Big Chuck, and Moses Sadler.

Don’t Be Ridiculous: a reading of comedic sketches will take place this Saturday afternoon at the West Wing of the PA Convention Center.

Kricket’s Comedy Presents: Durty Comedy Night this Saturday at Durty Nelly’s Irish Pub (701 E MacDade Blvd Folsom PA). The show will feature comedy from: Chip Chantry, Dave Terruso,  Corson & Typhoon, Larry Jansen, and Chris Mas.

The Captain Action Comedy Show returns to The Conshohocken Cafe this Saturday for a night of comedy from: Rubi Nicholas, Dave Topor, and Joe Bell.

If you have any Philly comedy news worth mentioning – send it our way with an email to contact@witout.net

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 25

 

 

 

 

 


Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 24

 

 

 

 

 

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Comedy Around the Web, Vol. 28

In this article for Slate Tanner Colby talks about the differences between his reporting and writing for Belushi: A Biography and Bob Woodward’s Wired: The Short Life and Fast Times of John Belushi.

To promote a new indie comedy he’s starring in called Somebody Up There Likes Me, Nick Offerman made this video with Adam Scott, Megan Mullally, Amy Poehler, Alison Brie, and Stephanie Hunt.

Jimmy Fallon answered questions for this week’s edition of “Ask a Grown Man” from Rookie, the online magazine for teenage girls.

Fallon also had some help from Steve Carell and Justin Timberlake for the latest in his series “Real People, Fake Arms”.

Comedian J-L Cauvin wrote this piece on all of the things new comics “should” do.

Watch Jerry Seinfeld do five new minutes of stand-up on The Tonight Show.

Laughspin has been covering the comedy at SXSW (Day One, Day Two, Day Three, Day Four).

The trailer for Louie CK’s new HBO special, Oh My God, is now available to watch online.

Doogie Horner sent some “anonymous tips” to Philebrity.

The internet is an amazing place; one that can show us what the credits for shows like Breaking Bad and Game of Thrones would look like if they were produced in the mid 1990’s.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 22

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Comedy Around the Web, Vol. 24

Zach Galifianakis’s Between Two Ferns returned with its Oscar Buzz Edition (part one and part two).  Joining Galifianakis in this episode is a star-studded group of Oscar nominees: Jennifer Lawrence, Naomi Watts, Christoph Waltz, Anne Hathaway, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, Jessica Chastain, and Sally Field.

The UCB Theater in New York has announced some changes in their policies towards stand-up comedians in order to try to reach a compromise after the debate about paying performers.

Bill Burr was on Conan this week and shared his hilarious thoughts about Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Lance Armstrong.

Huffington Post Comedy shared Philly’s own Doogie Horner’s Things to Say During Sex flowchart in celebration of Valentine’s Day.

The Laugh Button created this rundown of all the 2013 TV comedy pilots.

Watch Paul F. Tompkins and Maya Rudolph cover Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes.

The 200th episode of the Comedy Bang Bang podcast is available as a video to watch online.

The Chris Gethard Show is on a quest to climb to the top of the iTunes podcast charts.

Chris Gethard is also the subject of this week’s episode of Modern Comedian where he talks about what doing The Chris Gethard Show means to him.

Will Ferrell worked in character as an usher named Ted Vagina at a Laker’s game this week. Why? Apparently just for fun.

Splitsider put together this list of the 82 best comedies currently streaming on Netflix. Go ahead, waste some time!

“This Is Why Everyone Needs A Best Friend” – A Chat with John McKeever and Tommy Pope of Bird Text

Last night at Helium saw the return of The Bird Text Comedy Show, which featured a brand new Bird Text sketch as well as stand-up performances by Mary Radzinski, John McKeever, Doogie Horner, Tommy Pope and headliner Mike Lawrence. After the show I sat down with John McKeever and Tommy Pope of Bird Text for an enlightening conversation about comedy, the future of Bird Text and a big exciting new break for Tommy. Oh, and Doogie Horner showed up about halfway through and delivered a strong endorsement of Bird Text’s approach to comedy.

Dave Metter: What are some things that go into choosing what sketches you want to produce and whether or not you release them?

Tommy Pope: We’re not the kind of people who just rush shit out so you can see it. We want it to be good. If it’s not good we don’t put it out.

John McKeever: We won’t just rush to film something just so you can see something.

TP: Yeah, we don’t want to put a weekly video out but it’s also detrimental to our progress. Like, I also think we overthink things sometimes.

JM: We’re both busy and Luke [Cunningham, fellow member of Bird Text] is extremely busy now so production is not that easy, and we have ideas but unless they’re really good and we think it’ll make our name look better I don’t think it’s worth filming them and putting them out. A lot of people, especially sketch groups, have this idea that, “Throw enough shit to the wall, see what sticks.” We throw a lot of shit to our own wall and we’re like, “Just get rid of all the shit.” We’ve got a lot of shit that nobody’s ever seen because it’s not good enough.

DM: That you’ve shot or are only written?

JM: That we’ve shot but are not good enough.

TP: We also have stuff that’s written that we know is good enough but production…takes money. But we see other sketch groups and other people in Philly and, it’s a catch-22 because, if you don’t consistently put out people won’t seek you, they won’t subscribe, but they also won’t want to find you and what you’re doing next if you’re not consistent with quality. The next thing has to be better than the last.

DM: With most of the people coming to a show like this they’re probably expecting just stand-up, though some attending know you from your videos. I’m curious about your thoughts on how the audience adjusts between going from stand-up to a film sketch during a show.

TP: This thing we showed tonight we were looking at each other going, “That killed.”

JM: I think you’re right, it’s a curveball, and when you throw it into the middle of a show: stand-up, stand-up, stand-up, video, everyone’s like, “What the fuck?” ya know? But you get to see how an audience receives it before you release it on the internet. The first time we showed “The Real Househusbands of Philadelphia” it was here during a show and we were all in the green room and we thought, “If this doesn’t go well here then this isn’t seeing the light of day,” and that was our first real sketch and…it killed. We put it out a day or so later and it got like fifty-thousand views. So, it can be a good barometer.

TP: We were like, “What are we gonna do with all the money?! Let’s go to Wildwood and get weird!”

JM: We got Tommy and John airbrushed on a couple T-shirts.

TP: We have a lot in the pipeline always but we are very hesitant to release because we are always fearful that it’s not good enough, and to that point, it kind of hinders us and our progress. So I think we could be bigger but ya know, I think we’re a little too under the microscope.

DM: When you have an idea or premise, what’s the process of how you decide whether it’ll best fit as a stand-up bit or as a sketch?

JM: I think it’s so differentiated in my head that I know the difference between a bit, what would be good on stage, and what would be better in a sketch, and a lot of times when we think of a sketch we have 100% confidence in each other and we text each other, “Sketch idea, high-end premise” and it’ll be just the premise and if everyone’s like “haha” then we start. As far as stand-up goes, the way I’ve always written bits is I write about stuff that interests me and attaches to my other bits. But I think sketch has to be more quickly palatable.

TP: Sketches are popular because they’re popular to masses. With stand-up it’s like, it’s something popular but the intricate way of going about it makes it just yours. So for sketch, in order to break out to the masses you have to find something that people are interested in and it can’t be about some goofy fucking story about your wife or your girlfriend. You need something that people will immediately click with. There are so many [YouTube] channels doing like hacky Ke$ha parodies. We could easily find advertising dollars by being a hack-ass sketch group but we don’t want to do that, and we’re cutting our nose off despite our face, but at the same time it’s like I refuse to be that group who does Britney Spears and how it relates to the Super Bowl or whatever.

DM: How did you link up with Mike Lawrence?

JM: Mike knows Luke from stand-up in New York. Luke lived in New York for a while doing stand-up and did well there.

DM: How does Luke being back on the east coast, now that he is writing for Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, affect Bird Text?

TP: Luke’s always been like the foundation of the structure of the sketches we write. He was in LA for a year but we’re excited he’s here and, it’s weird, no one recognizes his face or name from Bird Text which is unfortunate but he does a shit load of the creation of many of our sketches.

[Doogie Horner enters.]

Doogie Horner: Bird Text courts controversy wherever they go; they’re not going to apologize for being outspoken.

[Doogie Horner exits.]

DM: So you guys are thinking of doing a monthly Bird Text show at Helium?

TP: Yeah. We did a monthly thing here for four months during a summer on Tuesdays, but we hit all of the summer holidays that year which was rough.

DM: And when you’re doing monthlies you’ll be incorporating sketches?

TP: Yeah, we’d like to do three but this show date was short notice.

DM: Why was that?

JM: I don’t know, I think it’s because they always had an interest in bringing us back plus another comic cancelled the date and, I don’t know, I think they probably contacted a few headliners before they contacted us.

DM: Oh don’t say that.

JM: Oh no, in reality we were probably like sixth or seventh on the list.

TP: I love how optimistic you are, like, “Oh don’t say that.”

And the big announcement…

JM: So Luke got this thing with Fallon which is huge for us but also, Tommy is flying to LA soon to do voiceover work for Disney. He flew out for an audition, this woman saw him perform in Montreal and thought “that guy can crush voices,” brought him in, they asked him to do this mobster voice and he crushed it and they’re bringing him back.

TP: This is why everyone needs a best friend. That couldn’t have been delivered any more smoothly.

Dave Metter is a comedy writer from the Philly burbs. Follow Dave on Twitter @DaveMetter.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 19

TOTW-Moore TOTW-Eastman TOTW-Grammond TOTW-Nunn TOTW-Swan TOTW-Chantry TOTW-Logan TOTW-Costello TOTW-Horner TOTW-Gleason

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Interview with Matt Monroe of Denver, CO’s ‘Propaganda!’ (Coming to L’etage this Sunday)

It’s that age-old fairy tale: A comedy nerd leaves his hometown in pursuit of Colorado snowboardom, and winds up becoming a full-fledged comedian himself.  The nerd-turned-comic in question, Matt Monroe, is back in town this week and putting on a special Philly edition of his Denver comedy showcase Propaganda!.  He’ll be bringing locals Alex Grubard, Alex Pearlman and Doogie Horner to the L’etage stage, along with Denver act Brett Hiker and NYC comics Ray DeVito and Scott Sharp.  Here’s more about Matt and this Sunday’s show:

WitOut: What’s your comedy background, and what took you away from Philly to Denver?

Matt Monroe: I’m pretty green, I’ve been doing stand-up now for almost two years.  That being said, I’ve been a huge comedy nerd since I was 21.  Before Helium opened, I used to go to NYC a few times a year just to see shows at the Comedy Cellar, and the now-defunct Dangerfield’s. I would disguise the NYC trip as taking whoever I was dating at the time “on a romantic weekend in New York,” but it was really just an excuse to go see shows.

I left Philadelphia in 2009 before I ever tried stand-up, and my reasons for leaving were pretty boring.  I had been here for 27 years and never lived anywhere else. I didn’t go to college, so I never even got that experience.  A lot of my friends were starting to get married, and have kids, and I had started to get into snowboarding.  So I used that as an excuse to move to a spot that is more conducive to a longer season.  I hadn’t really planned on living in Denver as long as I have.  After being there for almost two years, I had already made plans to move back to Philly (I let my job know, sold my SUV and bought a smaller car to prepare for Rittenhouse parking) and then 6 weeks before I left I stumbled across the Denver comedy scene accidentally, did an open mic, and that was it.

WO: What’s the comedy scene like in Colorado?

MM: It’s incredible.  For such a small place there is so much stage time, and so much talent to fill it.  We have 5 clubs in a 50-mile radius, and that doesn’t include improv theaters, cabarets, or other performance venues.  Just comedy clubs. We have a comedy festival (Laugh Track Comedy Festival) every summer. There are open mics every night of the week,  and there are at least a dozen comedian-run showcases that are spread throughout the month.  There is a lot of stage time, and the scene is incredibly supportive.  Not to mention Denver’s Comedy Works is one of the best clubs in the country, and they are very supportive of the up-and-coming scene.

WO: Describe a typical Propaganda! show. What makes it unique?

MM: To be honest, Propaganda! is more or less a typical showcase.  What makes it unique is the venue.  The show in Denver runs monthly in a really cool room in the basement of the historic D&F clock tower.  It’s a cabaret/burlesque showroom called Lannie’s and it’s got a really great vibe to it, and it’s absolutely perfect for comedy.  We were very lucky to get that venue, and it’s why I chose L’etage for the Philadelphia show, as it seems to be in that same vein.  What I try to do on a monthly basis, is have some out-of-town comedians on the show if at all possible.  We’ve been very fortunate to have some incredible comedians come through town and do the show including Sean Patton, Ron Funches, Kyle Kinane and Rory Scovel.

WO: What brings you back to Philly for these few weeks, and what made you decide to do an edition of Propaganda! while you’re here?

MM: Family, mostly.  I try to come back a few times a year to see family and friends.  I’ll be at the North Carolina Comedy Arts Fest, so I decided to schedule a couple weeks back home right afterwards since it’s a pretty short drive.  I decided to put on the show because I thought it would be a good opportunity to get my family and friends together who have never seen me perform before.  I also have a couple Denver friends that have recently relocated to NYC, and thought it would be fun to have them come down and perform with me and some Philadelphia comics.

WO: What do you like/miss the most about Philly comedy?

MM: The open mic scene in Philly is a lot of fun.  I didn’t get to perform much the last time I was in town, so I’m looking forward to getting out to some shows I haven’t been to yet.  Also, Helium is an incredible club that I miss a lot.  I’m looking forward to checking out a show, and maybe being able to perform at the open mic.

 

‘Propaganda!’ is this Sunday, February 10th at 8pm at L’etage (6th and Bainbridge Streets). Admission is $FREE.99.