Upcoming Shows

  • July 31, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • July 31, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • August 1, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • August 1, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • August 1, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • August 1, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • August 1, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • August 2, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • August 2, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • August 2, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • August 2, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • August 2, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • August 7, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • August 7, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • August 8, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • August 8, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • August 8, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • August 8, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • August 8, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • August 9, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • August 9, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • August 9, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • August 9, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • August 9, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • August 14, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
AEC v1.0.4

Philadelphia’s Will SPANK Horton at Helium Comedy Club (Review)

Will “Spank” Horton & WitOut.net's Priyanka Oza

Will “Spank” Horton & WitOut.net’s Priyanka Oza

Philly native, Will “Spank” Horton’s performance at Helium this past Saturday can be perfectly summed up by his very tongue-in-cheek closing line:

“Bye, everyone! I am not Hollywood and I never will be.”

After meeting him, I couldn’t agree more. Completely cool, laid back and friendly are just a few words I would use to describe this humble and talented comic.

Opening acts included comedians Anthony Moore and Darryl Charles. The absolutely amazing and adorable Moore had the audience roaring with his introductory line, “I am graduating this semester, so if y’all don’t laugh at this shit, I got a back-up plan.”

Both supporting comedians hilariously chronicled modern racial misunderstandings like professors asking for “black input” in classes as objective as math (Moore) or numerous requests to have his picture taken with locals during a trip to China (Charles). If you ever get a version of the Chinese Facebook, Charles warns you that you may see pictures of him awkwardly posing with the Chinese. He reminds us in this 2014 WitOut-Award-nominated bit that, this is not by choice.

Our headliner has been busy. You may have caught Spank on Nick Cannon’s Wild N’ Out, on tour with Kevin Hart during Let Me Explain and Laugh At My Pain, or in the recent hit movie Ride Along. However, Spank started his comedy career at the just-closed-down Laff House. And if y’all didn’t know, Spank has officially moved into the township. The energetic and well-projected comedian weaved the little tid-bit into every joke, reminding us every chance he got. “I can’t get into it with y’all, I live in the township now, we don’t do that!” he joked with a particularly charming group of hecklers.

Philly is glad to know things are going well for Spank. I honestly cannot think of one topic Spank did not cover during his show–relationships, marriage, college life and his own personal life. Spank’s method of comedy flirts intimately with the line between appropriate and inappropriate, pushing the boundaries of racial humor.  Experiencing his comedy live, it becomes obvious that this acclaim is very much well-earned. Tame one minute, risqué the next.

“I don’t want any trouble now, my wife is in the audience,” he joked. But I’m sure Mrs. Horton knows, all is forgiven in love and comedy!

Announcing the Hosts of 2014 WitOut Awards (Sunday, Jan 26 @ World Cafe Live)

aubrie williams

Aubrie Williams

Darryl Charles

Darryl Charles




Members of the Philly Comedy Community, if you haven’t filled out your nomination forms, do it quick!

James Hesky’s Top Ten CheaPodcast Moments

by: James Hesky

As a lot of you know, Darryl Charles and I decided to bring CheaPodcast to a close this week after 125 episodes. A lot of people (Mostly just superfan Chris Curtis) have been asking us questions like “Why?” or “How could you do this to me?” or “Oh, that’s cool, you have a podcast? I don’t really listen to podcasts, but congrats man. Or I’m sorry. I don’t really know what to say in this situation. Everything cool between you guys?”

We started the podcast as a way to promote our monthly show “Cheap Laughs” at the Raven Lounge. Unfortunately, that show died a sudden death when it became clear that we had no clue how to run a show and the bar found out that we weren’t nearly as lucrative as bachelorette parties. Still, we decided to keep rolling with the podcast, putting out an episode once a week because we had nothing else to do and it made us feel like we were real comedians.

Now everything is different. Darryl is in ComedySportz, got married and has a house (I think I’m putting that in order of importance, but you’d have to check with Darryl), I’m the phunniest person in the city, and we both get booked enough that we don’t need a podcast to cover up whatever darkness we have deep down inside of us that makes us force strangers to listen to our thoughts.

It was a good run, but all good things must come to an end. And so must mediocre things that were kind of fun but starting to get tiring.

We’ve had a lot of fun and a lot of great guests from the Philly comedy community (And some of the headliners and features at Helium), so here are my ten favorite moments from our two-and-a-half year run.

10. I pass out mid-episode

Episode 13—“Episode 8”

At this point in the podcast, I was working a 60-hour-a-week job that I hated. We recorded on a Friday after I had worked closer to 80 hours in five days. I was exhausted and looking to get liquored up. So I got myself a bottle of iced tea vodka and a 2-liter of lemonade and made some drunk Arnold Palmers. All was going reasonable well for the first 30 minutes or so, but then that fourth drink and the entire week hit me and I started to fade. Darryl did a great job of leading the podcast, and I did my best to hang in there, but I came up just short. As we were closing, Darryl looks over at me and sees that I’m asleep and calls me out on it. I say the only thing that I can think of which was “I feel bad.” It was true in every sense of the phrase.

I told Darryl I wasn’t comfortable putting that up, so we re-recorded the episode later that weekend. Five weeks later, Darryl and a respiratory infection and I was working so I couldn’t record with anyone else, and Darryl posted the original episode 8 for the week.

9. Little Cat ends the first episode

Episode 1— “A Series of Tubes”

As much as I would like to say that we had a plan for the first episode, we didn’t. We knew we wanted to do a podcast and we were going to tie in weird news stories with a theme. That’s it. And we definitely didn’t know the danger of letting my roommate’s cat sit on my leg for the last few minutes of the podcast. I forgot that if I moved slightly or there was any noise louder than a light breeze, he did this thing where he buried his claws deep into my flesh. So our first podcast ends with me just screaming in pain, trying to detach a cat from my thigh muscle.

8. Joe Doc deals with joint custody

Episode 36— “I’m Sorry You Have to See This”

As some of you may remember, Darryl and I got into a little bit of a fight following a series of articles on Witout called “The Great Debate” (Round One, Round Two, Round Three)Looking back on it, it’s so silly that it almost looks completely staged. But it totally wasn’t. It’s not like we got into a fake fight then had no idea how to end it so we just went deeper into the argument to see just how much yes anding we could do.

It all came to a head when we had on Joey Dougherty and decided that we couldn’t stand to be in the same room with each other, so we did the first half with me, and the second half with Darryl hosting and forced Joe to decide who he liked better. It was a shameful moment for both of us.

7. The worst transition of all time

Episode 54—“TWENTY NINE and a half MEN” 

Oh boy. This one was pretty bad.

If you’ve ever listened to our show, you know that we like to come up with transitions between the articles. Usually it’s a giant stretch and we just make fun of the other person for failing, but if it goes well, it’s usually our favorite part of the podcast. Well we had H. Foley, Chris Cotton, Conrad Roth and Tom Cassidy (All from Center City Comedy) on for the show, and the theme for the episode was roommates. We were wrapping up an article about a motel with a shitload of registered sex offenders, and the next article had something to do with kids. So in my brilliance, I decide to go for the transition without telling anyone, so in the middle of a conversation about pedophiles I chime in with “Well, kids love attention…”

I know now that I was wrong, and I’m sorry. Let’s just move on.

6. Finding out that we suck at recording

If you listen to our first 50 episodes or so, you may notice that the sound quality sucks. Anyone who spoke too loudly would max out the mics and everything sounded a bit grainy. We did everything we could to mess with the sound. We adjusted the mixer, we put the mics in different places, we downloaded new recording software. It didn’t matter, we couldn’t fix it.

It turns out that’s because we were recording directly into Darryl’s computer mic, not the mics hooked up to the mixer. After that, we just started recording directly into my digital recorder, because we suck at trying things that are difficult.

5. Brendan Kennedy gets blackout drunk then does the podcast

Episode 28—“I’m Sorry I Broke The Internet, Computer”

For a brief period, Darryl and I (Along with our good buddy Mykal Carter-Jackson) ran a Sunday open mic at Connie’s Ric Rac (Among other places), which was right across from the famed Hate Speech Hall. Somewhere along the way, Brendan Kennedy found a bottle of whiskey and a jar of pickle juice and drank all of both, then did our podcast.

I love this entire episode, but some favorite moments include:

• Starting off by talking about how hot dogs are from heaven

• Having to delete an entire five-minute chunk because Brendan kept talking about Darryl’s job

• Brendan wanting to rename C-sections “Don’t block my shine, shorty.”

Give it a listen.

4. Getting John Oliver and Kurt Metzger to do our podcast

Episode 52— “I think I’m Sad Again with John Oliver and Kurt Metzger”

We had already had some great local comics on (Chip Chanty, Mykal Carter-Jackon, Sue Taney, and Luke Giordano just to name a few), but we realized we were being idiots for not including some of the headliners who we were opening for at Helium. I remember being nervous to ask Jeff (One of the managers at Helium) if it would be okay to ask the headliners to do the podcast. He said it was fine, but he was curious to see how it went because no one’s ever asked before. I could easily imagine this turning into a conversation where I was told that I was suspended from Helium for a year and a new “Hesky Rule” would be put in place where no one could ask the headliners to do a podcast without going through their agent first.

Luckily the first week we had the opportunity was with Kurt Metzger and John Oliver: Two of the nicest dudes in comedy. We spoke way too fast while doing it, and the interviews are practically unlistenable, but at the end of the John Oliver one, you can tell that Darryl and I are both celebrating the fact that we will probably get to do this again sometime because it went just well enough.

3. Watching the Cleveland Bus Driver video on repeat for 10 minutes

Episode 92— “You Goin to Jail Now!”

I remember in 10th grade getting so high one time with a friend, that he made a dumb observation about milk cartons and we laughed so hard and for so long that I legitimately started to worry that I would never be able to stop laughing. I thought I would have to just go through the rest of my life laughing. It would be going on at school, during graduation, whenever I met people at college, and while I was getting married.

This is the only time I’ve laughed harder than that. For a solid ten minutes we watched the video of a bus driver uppercutting a woman who refused to pay her fare then pushed the driver. It’s the most amazing video I’ve ever seen. If you haven’t seen it, here it is. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbRYTLzkd04

You’re welcome.

2. The Hangovercasts

Episode 3 – “Say It loud”

Episode 51 – “Hangovercast”

Episode 103 – “The Internet is Better Back Here”

I don’t remember exactly how it happened, but I know that at some point we decided that it would be a brilliant idea to record on New Year’s Day 2011. My roommate and I had gotten a quarter keg of Miller Lite and needed help finishing it, so we invited Darryl and Lori over to help us drink beer (And bloody marys). The podcast was a bit of a clusterfuck, as you would expect it to be, but it was fun.

So the next year, we decided to do it again. This time we invited a bunch of comedians and some fans of the show to take part. We were in just as much pain, and I had to leave in the middle to go help Johnny Goodtimes move a keg that was responsible for breaking his rear window the night before.

Then this year, we had big plans, but it all went to shit until our good buddy Pat Barker came through and helped guide us through a particularly rough hangover (For me, at least.) It was a great tradition, and now I have to find out what else I’m supposed to do to nurse my New Year’s Day hangover.

1. Todd Glass and Geoff Tate get Brendan Kennedy-level drunk and do the podcast

Episode 95 – “We’ll be Right Back With Todd Glass and Geoff Tate”

I opened up for Todd Glass out in Phoenixville for a one-nighter at PJ Ryan’s. After the show, Todd had a fair amount of whiskey but had already agreed to do my podcast. We ended up at Helium and ran into Geoff Tate (Who was featuring that week) who was just as drunk, and they both decided to jump in and do the podcast. It turned into one of the greatest moments of my life. I’d add to that, but just listen to the first 15 minutes, and if you don’t start crying at the 8:50 mark, you have no soul. Don’t turn it off there either, just keep listening and Todd keeps being Todd. It’s the best.

Go ahead, I’ll wait.

You see? I was right. And you’re welcome.

James Hesky is a Philadelphia stand-up comedian and reigning winner of Helium Comedy Club’s Philly’s Phunniest Person Contest. He asks that you follow CheaPodcast on Twitter for more updates in the upcoming week’s on the show’s favorite guests and episodes. You can listen to the final episode of CheaPodcast online.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“We Hit You Hard and Fast with Hip-hop and Comedy!” – Interview with Alli Soowal of Beatbox Philly

On the last Friday of every month, ComedySportz is bringing in original outside acts for their 8pm time slot, ahead of their 10pm adults-only The Blue Show.  This month, ComedySportz Presents features Beatbox Philly, the Philadelphia version of a Chicago-born show that combines improv scene work with improvised raps and beatboxing.  The group’s players are all also ComedySportz cast members: Alli Soowal, Darryl Charles, Sue Taney, Mark Leopold and Matt Lally. Here’s Alli to tell you more about the group and this Friday’s show.

bbx

WitOut: For people who aren’t familiar with it, can you describe what happens at a Beatbox Philly show?

Alli Soowal: We hit you hard and fast with hip-hop and comedy!  Our show is 45-55 minutes and it interweaves scenic improv with freestyle rapping— including improvised beats from our very own beatboxer.

WO: The members of Beatbox Philly are also all ComedySportz players, right? How did you guys decide to come together for this?

AS: We are!  Well, all of us except for Matt Lally, who is our beatboxer.  I’ve known Matt for years from the comedy scene, and we produced Comedy Month together, so when we were looking for a skilled beatboxer, I approached him and Dave Terruso to give me ideas of who would be good.  They both replied “ummm…you know Matt has skills because you’ve seen him perform!”  As for how the rest of us came together, Beatbox started in Chicago and we have had them perform at the Philly Improv Festival, plus I’m good friends with Rene Duquesnoy—one of the co-founders of Beatbox.  I had wanted to put together a hip-hop show for awhile, so I talked to Rene, and he came to Philly and offered workshops through ComedySportz Philly, including one just for CSz performers.  From that, I was able to gauge interest from other company members.  Rene gave his blessing to use the Beatbox name (there is also a Beatbox in Minneapolis), and Beatbox Philly was born!  We made our debut at last year’s Fringe Festival, and it was so well received that we wanted to keep going.

WO: Do any of you have a rapping background? How did you learn to freestyle, and what do you do to practice?

AS: Interestingly enough, Mark Leopold is a self-produced rap artist—like hardcore gangsta style!  I won’t give you his stage name because it’s too dirty for the pages of WitOut.  He’s the only one, though, who comes from that world.  The rest of us learned to rap from ComedySportz rehearsals and classes, as well as lots of practice alone in cars.  Rene teaches a “Mad Skillz” workshop each year at the ComedySportz Championships that several of us have taken.   We also incorporate rapping into our shows in some games (“Kick It,” “Elimination Rap,” “Beastie Rap,” etc.), so everyone needs to be somewhat proficient in it.  When we practice, we go through a series of exercises designed to gradually pull raps out of you, and to increase your confidence.  Freestyling requires hella trust in your own brain to spit out words that you can make work into a cohesive song. 

WO: Do you guys have rap names? If not, do you want to make some up for everyone right now?

AS:

Darryl “Salt” Charles
Sue Peppa” Taney
Mark “Misdemeanor” Leopold
Kevin “Left Eye” Lopez
Alli “Lady Boo” Soowal

Matt MC Spinderella” Lally   

Not performing, but also a member, is Bobbi “M.I.A.” Block.

WO: What are you most excited about for your upcoming ComedySportz Presents show?  Will there be any new or special surprises for audience members who are already Beatbox Philly fans?

AS: I’m so excited to be back with this awesome crew!  We had a blast with our past shows, can’t wait to do it again.  As for surprises, there will likely be some special guest appearances but you will just have to come out to see it!


Catch Beatbox Philly at ComedySportz (2030 Sansom Street) this Friday, February 22nd at 8pm. Tickets are $12.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 20

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Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Tweets of the Week, Vol. 17

ChipChantry TimButterly AaronNevins JamesHesky RyanCarey AlisonZeidman JohnKensil SteveSwan DarrylCharles AlexNewman

Follow Witout on Twitter for updates from our site, as well as retweets of more of the best 140-character-or-less jokes from Philly comics.

Meet Your Nominees for the 2013 WitOut Awards: Best Male Improviser

It’s almost time for the 2013 WitOut Awards for Philadelphia Comedy!  As we get closer to the show, we’ll be rolling out a series of posts to help you get more acquainted with this year’s nominees. Read all about ‘em, and then be sure to get your tickets for the big event on January 13th at World Cafe Live!

The nominees for Best Male Improviser are:
Luke Field (Asteroid!, Hot Dog)
Andrew Stanton (King Friday, Kait & Andrew)
Dennis Trafny (Hey Rube, Iron Lung)
Alex Newman (Davenger)
Darryl Charles (ComedySportz, Hate Speech Committee)

Dennis Trafny on Alex Newman:
“He’s a funny SOB. He’s doesn’t look it on account of his husbandry, but he is a really, really smart dude.  And he uses those smarts for some of the funniest, most juvenile scenes I’ve seen in Philadelphia.  He could probably, no joke, be an astrophysicist but instead he chose to pretend to be a smartphone eating dinner at a long table with a bunch of weirdos or a boss that won’t give trophies to his employees, and the Philly comedy community is reaping the benefits.  His beard is also a lil QT pie.”

Andrew Stanton on Luke Field:
“Luke Field was conceived on the field of battle and that is where he gets his name. As a baby, Luke fought his way out of the hospital. Luke once threw a boy twice his age over a fence. Luke bit a dog. Luke drank an entire lake. Luke once dealt a poker game for the mafia and they didn’t scare him one bit. Luke has seen the edge of space. Luke wrote the lyrics to ‘Ace of Spades’. Luke is coming from inside the house. Luke is dangerously funny. Luke is an incredible improviser. Luke is great.”

Luke Field on Darryl Charles:
“If you were to compare all the nominated male improvisers to sports people (also known as “athletes”), Darryl obviously would be Bo Jackson…because they are both three-sport athletes! (Stop being a racist!) Darryl is an all-star improviser with ComedySportz and the reigning “WitOut Best Improv Team” Hate Speech Committee, much like Bo was a Pro Bowl ball-runner for such-and-such football team. Darryl is an elite stand-up comedian and last year’s winner of “Best Stand-Up Bit,” much like Bo would smack some dingers while playing for America’s team, the Kansas City Royals. And, also, in addition to all that, Darryl is an accomplished sketch writer, contributing to “The Monthly Hour with James Hesky” and “Bird Text,” much like Bo was a noted cartoon personality/crime fighter in the Saturday morning cartoon “ProStars” (third sport). Oh, and did you know Darryl also co-hosts Philadelphia’s best podcast, “CheaPodcast?” And did I forget that fact right up until this very moment and I am adding it in right now? Answer: YES TO BOTH. That’s four sports! One more than Bo Jackson! Darryl Charles is also a noted lover of animals while Bo Jackson was a malicious hunter exclusively of endangered species [citation needed]. You heard it here first folks: Darryl Charles is BETTER than Bo Jackson at comedy, sports and general humanity.”

Alex Newman on Dennis Trafny:
“Dennis Trafny is my bearded brother in arms and fellow metal head. He is an insane genius of improv who plays demented murderers with the same realism as he plays innocent children. Which is horrifying when I stop to think about it. Let’s just say I’m glad he’s on my side.”

Darryl Charles on Andrew Stanton:
“Andrew is awesome, and funny. I’ve seen him perform a bunch and he can switch from short one-liners to long and interweaving stories while keeping his trademark wit and mannerisms intact. That’s good, and hard to do. I like him a bunch, and I’m a fan of his improv too. If anyone was going to win this but me, I’d want it to be Andrew. Sadly, it won’t be. But I’m happy he was nominated.”

 

Meet Your Nominees for the 2013 WitOut Awards: Best Stand-up Comedian

It’s almost time for the 2013 WitOut Awards for Philadelphia Comedy!  As we get closer to the show, we’ll be rolling out a series of posts to help you get more acquainted with this year’s nominees. Read all about ‘em, and then be sure to get your tickets for the big event on January 13th at World Cafe Live!

The nominees for Best Stand-up Comedian are:
Aaron Hertzog
Chip Chantry
James Hesky
Doogie Horner
Darryl Charles

Doogie Horner on James Hesky:
“James Grammond is hilarious. I can’t think of a funnier James in Philadelphia! Just kidding.

One time James Hesky and I went to the driving range. Fifty percent of my drives sliced right so hard that they landed in the creek next to the range, but James didn’t laugh at me once, not even later that night when I was on stage telling jokes.”

Aaron Hertzog on Chip Chantry:
“When I started doing stand-up in Philly a little over six years ago Chip Chantry was one of the comedians I most wanted to impress. When I heard him laugh at my jokes from the back of the room at an open mic, or he said something nice to me about one of my jokes it really meant a lot because I looked up to him so much. Years later my respect and admiration for Chip have only grown as I’ve learned more about what goes into doing comedy. Chip is constantly writing and creating new, great material. His work ethic is something every comic should try to emulate. He’s been one of the top comics in Philly for years, and plays clubs and venues all over the country and is not content to rest on his laurels. Chip can also play any type of room. He’s got material that will kill in a room full of young, city hipsters and he can wow a crowd of older suburban ‘normal people’. No matter what type of show you are putting on, you can be safe booking Chip and know he will do a fantastic job. He can write topical jokes, material about his personal life, crazy off-the-wall stuff, tell a fantastic story, and can write the heck out of a sketch. Any time I need help with a writing project I know I can count on Chip, because not only is he a great comedian and writer, he’s also a great friend.”

Darryl Charles on Doogie Horner:
Doogie is awesome, and funny. He can effortlessly switch from short one-liners to long and interweaving stories while keeping his trademark wit and mannerisms intact. That’s good, and hard to do. I like him a bunch, and I’m a fan of his writing too. If anyone was going to win this but me, I’d want it to be Doogie. Sadly, it won’t be. But I’m happy he was nominated.”

Chip Chantry on Darryl Charles:
“Most comedians are like vodka—they’ll get you drunk, sometimes they’re hard to swallow, and you can see right through them. But you pretty much know what you’re getting.

Darryl Charles, on the other hand, is like Pinnacle Vodka—there are many different varieties of Darryl. It’s no secret that Darryl is perhaps the most versatile performer in Philadelphia. Because from night to night (and many times set to set) Darryl plays a variety of hilarious roles in the Philadelphia comedy scene. Whether he’s doing stand-up, performing improv with ComedySportz or Hatespeech Committee, doing the Cheapodcast and The Monthly Hour with James Hesky, or making videos with those jerks at Bird Text, the only consistent thing about Darryl Charles is that he’s always funny.

And he’s also sweet.

And he loves Butterscotch Vodka.”

James Hesky on Aaron Hertzog:
“Aaron Hertzog used to be quite overweight, then he lost 200 pounds.  But you know what he didn’t lose?  His sense of humor.  And also whatever sadness is buried deep within his soul that makes him have to perform stand-up comedy.  That’s definitely still there.

Aside from stand-up, Aaron is also part of Hey Rube, Hate Speech Committee and the Holding Court Podcast.  Or at least he was until he left Philadelphia to live in L.A. so he could pursue his dream of never having to be more than 40 feet away from Luke Giordano.”

Review: Rant-O-Wheel

By: Tony Narisi

The Philly Improv Theater at the Shubin Theatre saw the last installment of the Rant-O-Wheel this Monday night. As the night got started, host Jaime Fountaine filled the wheel up with ten nouns shouted out by the audience and began bringing the finest Rant-o-wheelers in Philadelphia onstage to tell a story, real or made-up, in five minutes or less using three of these words.

First up was the pair of Darryl Charles and Sue Taney, tackling six words instead of three. Using “creamed corn,” “tortellini,” “Steve Buscemi,” “Jersey Shore,” “Skittles,” and “sabotage,” Darryl and Sue told the story of a boy who began an anti-Willy Wonka campaign. Jaime played the role of conductor and had some sadistic fun that really upped the laughs, switching the narrator every word at times or pointing to both of them and forcing them to speak in unison.

Next up was Tom Whitaker, who used “rain dance,” “lava lamp,” and “candle” to deliver a superb monologue, in the form of a video message to a recent ex, lamenting the fact that he’ll never find real love in the City of Brotherly Love. Perhaps most remarkable was his delivery, which consisted of a believable and consistently straight face and a stare into the distance, addressing his ex as “you” the entire time.

Following Tom was Larry Napolitano, who quickly breezed through his words of “donkey lips,” “nothing,” and “Dustin Hoffman” in a rant about how he is miserable regarding his aging to get to what was apparently on his mind all along—a hilarious tirade against Ferris Bueller that eventually ended in the murder and defiling of his corpse on his father’s broken car.

Next up was Hillary Rea who used “swing,” “guffaw,” and “side boob” to recount her childhood fears and embarrassments, which included earthworms being thrown at her and a perpetual fear of boys seeing her incorrectly worn Days of the Week underwear. While hearing her memories, the audience couldn’t help but laugh along with Hillary as they remembered their own rough patches in childhood.

Cara Schmidt came next, using “band,” “Jellies,” and “Aquanet” to reveal one of her deepest darkest secrets to the audience—she’s not that good at driving, as evidenced by her twelve cars in seven years. Throughout her monologue, the audience got a very funny peek into the mind of sixteen-year-old Cara and her six attempts at the driving exam, including her various attempts to sway (or bribe) the system.

Finally, Jaime herself finished the rest of the words on the wheel, using “vagrant,” “chicken soup,” “artichoke,” “yellow,” “burp,” and “Rain Man” to tell the story of Rant-o-wheel itself, in a final monologue that was both heartwarming and laugh-inducing. She then ended the show by saying that Rant-o-wheel isn’t dead, it’s just going into hibernation. So if and when the Rant-o-wheel comes out of its slumber, do yourself and these performers a favor and make sure to check it out and support some great local comics telling some very funny stories.