Upcoming Shows

  • October 1, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 2, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 2, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 3, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 3, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 3, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 3, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 3, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 4, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 4, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 4, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 4, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 4, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • October 8, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 9, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 9, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 10, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 10, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 10, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 10, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 10, 2014 9:00 pmFall Comedy Train Rek
  • October 10, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 11, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 11, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 11, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
AEC v1.0.4

It’s Always Funny in Philadelphia posts about The Cape May Comedy Festival

always funny in phillyIn some local comedy news, there’s been a bit of backlash on social media against the organizers of The Cape May Comedy Festival.

Andrew Alexander–editor of It’s Always Funny in Philadelphia–found a participant from the festival to write an exposé on the proceedings. The resulting article is fascinating look at the shit show that comedians put themselves through, pretty much all the time.

At the end of the day, it’s hard to sympathize with the masochistic lifestyle choice of the standup comedian, which puts oneself through a dignity juicer semi-nightly for the belief that their voice and point of view are important. (Or, simply for funsies.) Still, when you see a “talented” comedian coming out the other end, you should admire their tolerance for the sausage grinder which takes experiences like this one and learns how to process it into laughs, in pretty much any setting.

The WitOut.net Podcast Ep. 15: The Incredible Shrinking Matt & Jacquie

Incredible Shrinking Matt & Jacquie Javelin 4

Jacquie Baker and Matt Schmid talk sketch-comedy shop and discuss their upcoming show at Phit.

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Here’s an ad for their show!

Photos from Dog Mountain / Comedy to See This Weekend

Tim Butterly opens the show with a great standup set, including a bit about how deals with annoying sports-related small-talk at work.

Tim Butterly opens the show with a great standup set, including a bit about how deals with annoying sports-related small-talk at work.

Dog Mountain (1)  2-14

Members of Dog Mountain show how there can be many different forms of “That Guy” at a party.

Dog Mountain (6)  2-14

A doctor restores a woman’s hearing with a cochlear implant, only for her to find that her husband’s voice and taste in music are insufferable.

Dog Mountain (5)  2-14

A public service announcement: man reads his brother’s very unlikely last text message before dying in a very unlikely car accident.

Dog Mountain (4)  2-14

[Show Stealer!] Sometimes a “bad cop” can lose half his body function in a stroke and end up being even scarier.

Dog Mountain (3)  2-14

Liberal-minded man lambastes neighbor for his unconscionably bad-for-society day-jobs.

Dog Mountain (2)  2-14

Grieving parents are easily distracted by pop-culture recollections. “Who was the guy from that sitcom….”

Dog Mountain performs again tonight at PHIT, 9:00pm.

~~~~~~

There are some rare extra comedy treats happening this weekend. In addition to many of the regular shows you can find on our calendar, here are a handful of must-see performances.

Friday:

Jim Jeffries @ The Keswick Theater. 8:00pm
If you haven’t seen his comedy, give yourself a quick sample on YouTube. He’s like an Austrailian Doug Stanhope. He may some day go down as one of the greats.

Hang On With Aaron Nevins @ The Adrienne Playground. 8:00pm.
Outstanding panel comedy featuring very funny Philly comedians. Tonight’s guests are the creators of High Maintenance–named Best Web Series by USA Today and The Guardian–and Ethan T. Berlin the creator of IFC’s Bunk (who’s also been a writer on Superjail and Da Ali G Show).

Saturday:

Davenger’s Final Show @ PHIT. 9:00pm.
The former WitOut Award Winner for best new act features many of Philadelphia’s best young improv talent. They’re likely to sell out, so get your tickets online.

Ted Alexandro @ Helium. 7:30pm & 10:00pm.
Very funny Letterman regular. Catch him here at a small club before he starts doing theaters.

Photos from February’s A Bunch of Improv @ The Grape Room

Sam Scavuzzo’s monthly improv showcase ran Tuesday night in Manayunk. Parking was actually not atrocious despite large deposits of snow on the ground, and it being Manayunk. Laughs were had. PBR’s were $3 bucks. You should come to the next one. 

Members of Cake Bear hunt a tiger that has learned to pick up their weapon!

Members of Cake Bear hunt a tiger that has learned to pick up their weapon!

Members of 4AM in Thailand participated in the Olympic event for unqualified suburban bobsledders.

Members of 4AM in Thailand participated in the Olympic event for unqualified suburban bobsledders.

Dave Terruso kills it with bits about his girlfriend leaving hair-merkins on the shower wall and falling asleep while "driving stick shift".

Dave Terruso kills it with bits about his girlfriend leaving hair-merkins on the shower wall and falling asleep while “driving stick shift”.

Members of Bed Savage convene the Kitty Council.

Members of Bed Savage convene the Kitty Council.

Members of The Corpse of Dan Rodden are paranoid that a high-school crush is really an android.

Members of The Corpse of Dan Rodden are paranoid that a high-school softball star is really an android.

Are you running a comedy show in Philly? Send us photos so you don’t have to get captured on my iPhone 4!

Video: Emoticon Support Group

Stare @ Shannon presents Emoticon Support Group written by Aubrie Williams and starring Aubrie, Shannon, Jen Curcio and Jess Ross.

(Slow build-up, totally worth it for the last ten seconds!)

The WitOut Dot Net Podcast Episode 14: Bryce Remsburg

Bryce Remsburg
On this episode of the WitOut Dot Net Podcast, we chat with Bryce Remsburg of Chikara Pro Wrestling and Secret Pants. Bryce breaks kayfabe to candidly discuss the current Chikara storyline, and helps us break down the evolution of the Philadelphia sketch comedy scene. Visit www.Chikarapro.com.

[Calendar update: Rory Scovel played Helium this past weekend, Wadsworth Constant/Dean's List ran 2/15. This podcast was expected to drop prior to these shows. Unfortunately, if you didn't see them, you missed them. For now...]

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ComedySportz: Philly Fighting Amish Beat the NJ Turnpikes!

ComedySportz at Adrienne Theater

This past Saturday night at the Adrienne Theater, audiences enjoyed a great show-down between Philadelphia Fighting Amish and rival NJ Turnpikes.

In case anyone hasn’t checked out one of Philadelphia’s longest running shows, ComedySportz follows a similar format to that of the television show Whose Line Is It Anyway? The hour and half long show consists of various short-form improvisation games. Topics are based on audience suggestions and or instructions from the referee. After all these years, their color-coordinated jerseys, tennis shoes and team spirit still excite audiences.

Prepared to sing, dance and act, ComedySportz’s athletic form reminds us all that comedians are versatile athletes in their own right.Scoreboard fro ComedySportz

“The games were challenging, fun and clever, which made the show really funny,” stated a thoroughly pleased audience member. Games included “Story,” “Forward/Reverse,” and “What Are You Doing?” During the game “Story,” the entire team lines up on stage and either the audience or referee will suggest the concept of the story. Players have to make up the story as they go and have to stop talking as soon as the referee cuts them off.

Philadelphia ComedySportz runs classes on improv and corporate trainings on team building. In addition, they also do birthday parties and perform at corporate events. They also perform a kid’s show at 11:00a.m. on the last Saturday of every month.

** You can catch ComedySportz tonight at The Playground at Adrienne Theater (2030 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 19103) from 7:30p.m. to 9:30p.m. ($17/$14 for Students/Seniors/Military)

Q&A with Rory Scovel, Performing This Weekend @ Helium

Rory ScovelRory Scovel plays a supporting character on the TBS sitcom Ground Floor, and has a new standup comedy album called Rory Scovel Live at Third Man Records. He’ll be performing this weekend at Helium.

~~~~~

WitOut: On Ground Floor, you play a character named Harvard, who, I think, is the most interesting part of the show. How would you describe Harvard for someone whose never seen the show?

Rory Scovel: Thank you. I appreciate that. I am very lucky with this character. He is definitely the weirdo of the show, a role I’ve been preparing for most of my life. I’m not sure how to describe him really because I’m not a professional actor. I sort of just pretended I knew what I was doing at the audition and for some reason they liked that about me. That’s kind of who he is, Harvard. He just goes through life pretending he knows what he’s doing and being an office weirdo. I love him. Yes, I said I’m in love with my own character that I play. Further proof I’m so ready to be this guy on camera.

WitOut: What’s the experience been like in general? Is it intimidating being on the set with John C. McGinley?

Scovel: It’s been great. I’ve really loved it and I’m excited to get back for a second season, fingers crossed. It’s a great group to work with so I want to go back and have some more fun and see what we come up with. McGinley is a champion. Not only of the show and of the craft, but of people. He has an intimidating quality because I think he wants everyone working as hard as he is. He makes me a better actor, so it’s great to be around him. He is a pro.

WitOut: How’d you get involved with The Life and Times of Tim?

Scovel: A buddy of mine, BJ Porter, wrote on the show and recommended me to come in for it. We were working on a pitch for a show and it just worked out to go in and become one of the characters. I wish it was still possible to go in and do that show.

WitOut: What are some of the responses you’ve gotten to your album Dilation?

Scovel: Pretty good I think. I try not to read reviews too much but with that being my first album, it was hard to avoid. I think overall people enjoyed it and anyone that reviewed it seemed to like it. I know there are some people that didn’t like it and I hope those people die an awful death. Not soon or anything, I’m not a monster, but when it does come time for them to die, I hope it’s awful.

WitOut: Your new album is available on vinyl only. What influenced that decision?

Scovel: I recorded it on Jack White’s label Third Man Records, it’s called Rory Scovel Live at Third Man Records. They primarily release stuff in vinyl format and I thought it would be cool to just release it as that. I’m sure it’s out there in digital form somewhere ILLEGALLY. We decided to do it as just vinyl since some of the material is going to show up in my upcoming special that I’m shooting in Charleston, SC on 2/21 and 2/22. Didn’t want to have the same material over and over in different formats.

WitOut: Have you been watching the Olympics so far? What’s your favorite event?

Scovel: I have not watched any of it. I’m not sure that I will. Maybe the hockey. I don’t know, I really haven’t thought about it. The pressure, it gets to me.

~~~~

For tickets, visit www.HeliumComedy.com. After the late show Saturday, check out The Dirty Dozen at midnight. Twelve of Philadelphia’s most NSFW comics will regale you with stories too inappropriate to discuss on the internet!

Photos from Your News Philly, Guilty Pleasures and TV Party

Dan Vetrano warms up the crowd, getting big laughs for being a fan of "old" Miley Cyrus.

Dan Vetrano warms up the crowd, getting big laughs for being a fan of “old” Miley Cyrus.

Dave Metter and Allison Allison (Jacquie Baker) host YNP.

Dave Metter and Allison Allison (Jacquie Baker) host YNP.

Katilin Thompson YNP

Consumer critic Barb Bootsnider (Katlin Thompson) gives bad products The Boot!

Consumer critic Barb Bootsnider (Katlin Thompson) gives bad products The Boot!

But the critical lifestyle has caught up with her, and she decides to give herself the boot [not pictured because of photographer laughing too hard.]

Alexa & Darren (Martha Cooney and Chris Calletta) give a point/counterpoint debate on whether or not to give John Mayer a try.

Alexa & Darren (Martha Cooney and Chris Calletta) give a point/counterpoint debate on whether or not to give John Mayer a try.

Production assistant Colin Armstrong (Dan Corkery) suffers an existential crises as his chewing gum fails to stay in its package.

Production assistant Colin Armstrong (Dan Corkery) suffers an existential crises as his chewing gum fails to stay in its package.

Joe Moore (far left) and Roger Snair (far right) with a panel of improvisers (from left to right Steve Swan, Alex Newman, Aubrie Williams and Kaitlin Thompson) tribute the winter games by reading actual advice from Ask.com in Russian accents.

Joe Moore (far left) and Roger Snair (far right) with a panel of improvisers (from left to right: Steve Swan, Alex Newman, Aubrie Williams and Kaitlin Thompson) tribute the winter games by reading actual advice from Ask.com in Russian accents.

Roger ends the show with his important hip-hop message.

Roger closes the show with his important hip-hop message.

Paul Triggiani (left) and Rob Baniewicz (right) kick off the first TV Party in the theater space.

Paul Triggiani (left) and Rob Baniewicz (right) kick off the first TV Party in the theater space.

A theater full of comedians 'celebrates' the hilariously bad post-apocalyptic TV experiment from 1992 called Whoops.

A theater full of comedians ‘celebrates’ the hilariously bad post-apocalyptic TV experiment from 1992 called Whoops.

We also toasted this failed attempt at a sitcom version of Ferris Bueler’s Day Off from 1990:

Q&A With Philadelphia’s Big Jay Oakerson at Helium Comedy Club

We caught up with Philadelphia native Big Jay Oakerson before his show at Helium. Here, Big Jay explains how his crude, yet conversational, style was crafted by comedy heavyweights Patrice O’Neal and Dave Attell and how he became a fearless comedian.

Big Jay Oakerson at Helium Comedy Club

Big Jay Oakerson

WitOut: What do you enjoy most about coming back to Philly?

Big Jay Oakerson: I come back once a year to do this club and maybe a few times a year to see family. My favorite thing every time is–I think I’m supposed to say the club–but it’s the goddamn food. I miss the food here. Even in New York, which has a wider array of cultural food, like, fuck that, I’ll eat cheesesteaks twice a day while I’m here.

WiOut: How long have you been doing stand up?

Big Jay Oakerson: 15 years. I started at the Laff House, that shut down recently, but me, Kevin Hart, and Kurt Metzger all started there together.

WitOut: What’s your favorite part about doing this job?

Big Jay Oakerson: The live performance. Going out there and interacting with the crowd. I like to talk to the crowd a lot. Mixing it up with them and trying not to do jokes for as long as possible.

WitOut: You talk to the crowd a lot.

Big Jay Oakerson: Yeah, as much as possible.

WitOut: When you’re writing, what’s your process?

Big Jay Oakerson: I don’t write. Sit and write on paper? I never do that. There’s a big chance that I’ll go out and have a bunch of things that I’ll just say just tonight, but there’s also a chance that, if I say something for the first time, off the cuff, that will take me on a tangent. That’s how I write. Kurt Metzger will call and bounce jokes off me and ask me for a punch, but I found that when I sat down when I was younger, I would sit and write simplistic jokes that a thousand other comics make. I think I’m very original in my genuine take on shit, so I’d rather just talk to them. I’m just not afraid of them not laughing.

Anyone who starts doing comedy who has any arrogance to them, the first time you say something to a crowd, that in your mind was guaranteed to be funny and they’re going to laugh, and they stare at you, there’s just no way to simulate that emotion. The thing I worked on the most in comedy was to be unafraid of that. I’m not afraid of the room being completely silent. Patrice O’Neal gave me the advice that you don’t go up there and say anything you can’t defend genuinely. You should defend your right to be funny and that comes with having no fear of the audience.

WitOut: You mentioned Patrice O’Neal, who else did you look up to when you started doing comedy?

Big Jay Oakerson: In Philadelphia, there was a guy name Turae, who ran the open mic at the Laff House. He was a big influence because of how smooth he was and his style and how comfortable he was. And Keith Robinson took me, and Kev [Kevin Hart], and Kurt [Metzger] out of Philly and to New York and got us acclimated up there. From there, Patrice took me under his wing and we became friends. I found my real mesh, in terms of opening for somebody for years, was Dave Atell. I went all over the country opening for him. I think those two guys are the two best at their type of comedy.

WitOut: I was actually warned that your act was kind of dirty.

Big Jay Oakerson: Kind of? That’s bad advertising. I’m trying to desensitize you and make you hear the message that I’m saying.

WitOut: What’s the biggest difference between the New York comedy scene and the Philadelphia comedy scene?

Big Jay Oakerson: Frequency. New York has between 8-12 pro clubs running 7 days a week. Dozens of rooms, comedy shows, open mics, one nighters, every night from 5pm to 3am. Philly, you can probably, if you hustle, get up twice a week. Because there are a decent amount of comics and we’re down to one club. If you’re going to get better at comedy, it’s repetition. Repetition will make you stronger at it. It’s part of not being afraid.

~~~~~

You can catch Big Jay Oakerson tonight at Helium Comedy Club (7:30p.m. and 10:00p.m.) with Mary Radzinski and Aaron Berg.

Mary Radzinski at Helium Comedy Club

Mary Radzinski

 

Aaron Berg at Helium Comedy Club

Aaron Berg