Upcoming Shows

  • October 1, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 2, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 2, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 3, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 3, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 3, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 3, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 3, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 4, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 4, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 4, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 4, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 4, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • October 8, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • October 9, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 9, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 10, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 10, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 10, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 10, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 10, 2014 9:00 pmFall Comedy Train Rek
  • October 10, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 11, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • October 11, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 11, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
AEC v1.0.4

Podcast Pickins with Intern Lisa

This week’s podcast is The Champs!

The Champs podcast consists of  Neal Brennan (co-creator of Chappelle’s Show and stand-up comedian), Moshe Kasher (author of “Kasher in the Rye” and stand-up comedian), and DJ Douggpound. The episodes, which primarily feature African American guests, consist of Doug dropping sound effects and beats while Neal and Moshe host the show/interview. Guests of the show have ranged from actor/comedians Wayne Brady to David Alan Grier.

What makes this podcast special is that The Champs is completely honest and ready to talk about things that would make most people feel incredibly awkward or uncomfortable. The chemistry between Moshe, Neal, and Doug is undeniably funny and makes for some good podcast listenin.

 

 

My top 5 The Champs Pickins

5. Hannibal Buress

Hannibal Buress is most commonly known as the modern, black Mitch Hedburg. So its no surprise that this episode is full of hilarious and interesting anecdotes such as Hannibal’s small writing stint on 30 Rock and SNL, starting stand-up, and living forever. Perhaps the best moment is Hannibal and Moshe’s story of becoming, as they call it, “eskimo brothers.” Great interview with an awesome, up-and-coming comic.

4. Roy Wood Jr.

I’ve never been in a boy’s locker room but I imagine it’s a lot like this episode but without the actual body odor and the naked part. Perhaps the biggest and most notable topic in this episode is, well whatdoyouknow, women. Whether you think their views are disgusting or agree with what their saying, it is undeniable that some of their female related stories are ridiculously funny (i.e. Neal was once accused of drugging a woman in Las Vegas).

3. Retta

The 1st non-adult film actress on the podcast, the Champs and Retta discuss interesting and polarizing comedic issues such as the Adam Carolla controversy and getting started in stand-up as a woman. Although I disagree with Neal Brennan’s views, I love hearing a constructive debate, where people can share their opinions without being dicks.

2. Ron Funches

Ron Funches is perhaps the most adorable, soft spoken comedian I have ever heard.  Ron’s fascinating background allows for some hilarious and kind of scary stories such as poisoning his mother’s boyfriend when he was a kid. Although the stories are as funny as alarming, the guys also talk about the Tosh controversy and kindness in comedy. Once again, the Champs strike a fine line between  being dirty and uncensored, to talking about real and serious issues.

1. Questlove

I love when I hear a guest be an actual fan. It makes me feel not alone, or dreams are possible! Okay, maybe not the last part, but still, it’s pretty cool. Questlove proves to be an awesome guest by not holding back, and sharing some “inside the music” stories such as his beef with Biggie, the Michelle Bachmann scandal, and his friendship with Jay-Z. Also Doug’s drops make this episode worth listening to twice.

If you want to listen to more, please visit their website!

Interview With Tommy Pope, New Face at the 2012 Just For Laughs Festival

In case you haven’t already heard the news, 2011 Philly’s Phunniest Person Tommy Pope has been selected to perform as a New Face at the prestigious 2012 Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. We caught up with Tommy to ask him some questions about his recent achievement.

WITOUT: First of all, congratulations on being selected as a New Face for the 2012 Just for Laughs Festival. What was the audition process like?

Tommy Pope: Thanks buddy. It was fun. Auditions are fun, right? Like contests! Comedy contests are fun too, right? Do you like murder? Murder is fun. So, there were 3 rounds of auditions in NY and it lasted around 6 months. The tough part is that you don’t receive any feedback after your set. You just hope to get a callback months later. But receiving the invitation is worth all the stress. And blood.

WO: How did you choose your audition set? Did you pick your favorite jokes, or try to pick a set that had a theme, or that would best represent your own specific voice? Did you change it for each callback?

TP: I learned a lot about constructing a short set from performing in Philly’s Phunniest. I’d say it’s a mixture of all those things. Its my favorite jokes that have a theme as well as represent my voice. Btw, I would never say that last sentence out loud for fear of turning into an actual asshole. Throughout the 6 months I definitely wanted to change it. I have newer bits that I enjoy telling but you know the previous round worked so I just added chunks and tags.

WO: When did you find out that you were selected? Was it hard to keep the big news a secret?

TP: I found out May 30th, 4:07 pm. Seriously, I took a screen shot. It was terrible holding it in. It’s my first credit and you can’t share it with anyone. I didn’t even tell loved ones outside of the comedy circle for fear that they would post it on my Facebook wall. The last thing I need is my Aunt Mimi fucking up my dream with a simple post like, “Your Mom told me about Canada, you should bring a girl over for cake. Neil’s cutting the lawn.”

WO: Since knowing that you’re going to Montreal, have you made any changes in the way you approach stand-up in preparation for the festival?

TP: Not a thing. If it ain’t broke…keep drinking every night till your anxiety makes you question your existence.

WO: Have you talked to any other comedians who may have been New Faces in recent years for any pointers or advice? If so, what are some of your favorite words of wisdom?

TP: I’ve spoken to a few but not about advice, just well wishing. The most memorable quote came from Mark Normand, who described Montreal as “Comedy Disneyland”.

WO: Historically, Montreal has been a place where many comedians have arrived as unknowns and left with television deals. Do you have any pitches in your brain in case they come a-knocking? 

TP: I have a pitch idea about a sitcom where John McKeever and I get married and make videos from the comfort of our own Jet-skis. It’s (loosely) based on real life.

WO: What’s next for you? Do you have any specific plans or goals for the near or long-term future?

TP: I plan on doing standup and continuing to make quality videos with BirdText. We have some great things in the pipeline. But we need money. Seriously. Do you like murder?

You can see Tommy perform at Helium Comedy Club hosting and closing the Philly’s Phunniest Person Contest. He also produces sketch comedy videos as a member of Bird Text.

Philly Comedy Round-up, Vol. 52

Last night, the seventh annual Philly’s Phunniest Person Contest continued at Helium Comedy Club with Aaron Hertzog, Joey Dougherty, and Paul Easton moving on to the semi-finals. The competition continues Sunday, July 29 and the opening round continues until August 13 (full schedule here).

Submissions for Philadelphia’s Comedy Month are now open. Interested groups can apply for the 8th annual Philadelphia Improv Festival (November 7-11, 2012) and the 5th annual Philly Sketchfest (November 12-17,  2012) online. More details on the month-long City Spotlight will be available later. Early submission ($20) for groups is open until until August 17 and the final deadline ($30) is August 31.

This Wednesday, Camp Woods Plus returns for another show at L’etage (624 South 6th St. Philadelphia) This month’s show will feature the debut of Philadelphia sketch duo Tap City along with New York group Listen, Kid! As always, the show will feature brand new material from Camp Woods.

Also this Wednesday, comedy variety show Accidents Will Happen returns to Adobe Cafe (1919 E. Passyunk Ave. Philadelphia) for a night of stand-up from Jim Grammond, Omar Scruggs, John Nunn, Rachel Bensen, Lisa Yost, storytelling from Jamie Fountaine, sketch comedy from The New Dreamz and “Black Metal Legend” Necrosexual. The show is free and begins at 9pm and is followed by an open mic at 11.

This Saturday, The Sideshow makes another appearance at The Arts Parlor (1170 South Broad St. Philadelphia). The show will feature improv from Chaperone, Hot Dog, and Iron Lung as well as clowning from Kristen Schier. The show begins at 8pm and is $5.

Wet Behind the Ears: Talkin’ ‘Bout Debutin’ with Tap City

Tap City is a brand new sketch project from stand-up comic/improviser Aaron Hertzog and improviser Luke Field, two of the most modest fellas you’ll ever meet.  They have zero confidence in their abilities as sketch writers (or possibly all the confidence in the world, and this entire interview was a sham).  Their debut show is this Wednesday at Camp Woods Plus, and there’s a strong chance that anyone, everyone or no one who comes and laughs will get a big fat kiss from Luke.  

Alison Zeidman: How did Tap City start?

Aaron Hertzog: I started doing stand-up as a way to get into sketch, because I thought I would like sketch more. That’s kind of backwards I guess, instead of just starting a sketch group. I was like, I’ll do this, and then meet people to do sketch groups with, and then it got away from me. I liked stand-up more than I thought I would. And then eventually I wanted to do a sketch group, and Luke was the first person that I thought of that I wanted to work with and who wasn’t already in a group.

Luke Field: I come from a pretty strictly improv background, and I wanted to…expand my horizons…comedically. We were originally working with a few other people, a lot of busy people, and it kind of petered out.  Then we just found that we were writing some things that were almost exactly similar in tone and style, so we just started meeting together.

AZ: How did you come up with the name Tap City?

LF: We went to a website of old hobo slang.

AH: We went to a bunch of websites.  That wasn’t the first one we went to.

AZ: OK, what was the step before the hobo website?

AH: We were kicking around ideas, things that we liked, words, phrases, random things, just trying to keep together a short list of ideas. And I think we both liked the ring of the word “city,” but never went back to it, and when we finally had to come up with a name we were looking up old slang websites—

LF: I like old people.

AH:  Yeah, we both like old-timey slang and stuff like that. So we found one that was old-timey hobo slang.

AZ: And what does it mean?

LF: It means you’re broke. It’s a really thrilling story of discovery and excitement.

AZ: Through Google.

LF: Which is modern day Indiana Jones.

AZ: Can you talk about what sketch does for you in terms of creative fulfillment that you don’t get out of stand-up or improv?

AH: I like working with other people, and bouncing ideas back and forth. I love the writing process in sketch. Like if I come up with an idea and I write a first draft, and then Luke will read it and give me ideas and jokes, and things to tighten up. I love the collaborative creative process of coming up with something together.  Some of my ideas come from improv scenes that I want to make better. It’s like the core of it was good, and now I want to strengthen it.

LF: I’m doing improv 3 or 4 times a week, and it’s sort of disposable, but you’re generating a lot of material.  And I just wanted to challenge myself, too, because I had never really done any writing. Also it’s just a really good way for us to just beat ourselves up emotionally, and hate the work that we’re doing.

AH: It’s good pressure to put on yourself…

AZ: What kind of pressure do you feel with doing sketch?

LF: In improv, the audience gives you some leeway to fail, I feel. Even though you don’t want to. You want to get up onstage and put on a great show. And ultimately a great improv show will feel and sound like a sketch show. You’re basically writing a sketch on your feet. I feel like if we’re presenting this material that we’ve been working on for months and months and months, though, an audience is going to scrutinize it a lot more. So that makes for me an added level of anxiety.

AZ:  Do you feel those expectations from an audience when you’re doing sketch, when you’re actually performing?   Can you get a sense of that with the laughs or whatever feedback you’re getting from a sketch audience, versus an improv audience?

AH:  I think so.  It’s gotta be a lot tighter than an improv scene.

LF: I know for stand-up and especially for me for improv, we’re trained to just hear that laugh and follow it. Well I know it’s not like part of the training, but for me the first thing that I hear a laugh from, I think that’s probably something interesting that can be repeated and done over again, explored more. And even with stand-up it becomes a rhythm—I guess. I don’t know anything about stand- up.  But it’s a little bit tougher when we’re just sitting together by ourselves.

AH: Yeah, to know what’s funny. Stuff that makes us laugh might not make a crowd laugh and that’s something that I’ve learned through doing stand-up for almost six years, that everything that I think is funny a lot of people aren’t going to think is funny. And it’s just trying to figure it out before you get onstage, and also doing stuff onstage that fails, too.

LF: That’s why Sketch Up [at Philly Improv Theater] is so great.

AH: Yeah, for stand-up I have open mics. I can go to open mics almost any night a week if I have a new joke and try it out, and it’s less pressure because it’s just an open mic and if it doesn’t go well it’s probably just for other comedians. But with sketch, other than Sketch Up there’s no real way to test stuff. We have a sketch in the show on Wednesday that we just did at Sketch Up because we wanted to see how a crowd would react to it, and it was good because we were able to cut the sketch down and tighten it up.

AZ:  When do you feel like a sketch is finished, or in a finished enough state to be presented for your show? Do you feel like a crucial step is getting feedback from an audience and then going back and editing?

AH: Just from watching sketch and being around it, you know the beats of it and you know like an outline…you know where you want the sketch to go and how you kind of want it to end, but I don’t know, as far as knowing when something is completely ready, I never feel like something is completely ready. I hate everything I do [laughs] and I work on it forever.

LF: I feel like a total fraud giving this interview.

AZ: If you hate everything you do, what drives you to keep doing it?

LF: Just a lot of self-hate.

AH: Yeah, I need the self-hate to keep going. Because I need something to hate myself about.

LF: It’s the Dunning-Kruger effect. People who feel they’re really good at something are usually going to be the worst at it, and then the people who [are actually good at something] will never be totally satisfied because they also [know enough about it to know] how much better it can be.

AH: So what we’re trying to say is that we’re really good because we don’t think we’re good. Right?

LF: We’re determined…and it’s nice to have some great sketch comedy in the city to kind of look to. and is something to strive for.

AZ: Are there specific goals that you guys want to reach as Tap City? Or is there just a general sense of always striving to be better?

AH: I don’t know, I don’t think we set any goals other than to just have good shows.

LF: Yeah, the goal was July 25th. And then after that it was kind of…we’ll see what happens. But for me I want to just get stronger as a writer. Get in the habit of writing every day, or more than I already do, and maybe find a style.  I feel like every sketch group in the city, the ones that have been around for awhile, all have their own style and voice.

AZ: And you feel like you guys are still working on yours?

LF:  Yeah, we have nothing.

AH: We have things that we wrote that we thought were kind of funny, but I don’t feel like there’s a coherent voice yet.  And like Luke said, I also want to use it as an opportunity to just make myself write all the time, every day, and to put stuff out in front of people even if it’s just Luke. Even if it’s just sending it to Luke and getting notes and rewriting. I’m not a good rewriter, so that’s something I want to work on. I write something and then I get stuck in it and it’s hard for me to change it.

AZ: This might be a really weird question and might not make any sense, but I’m going to go for it.  Is it important that you know a sketch is funny when you’re writing it? I feel like in improv you’re told “don’t chase the laugh,” and  just commit to your character and commit to the relationship in the scene, and the humor will come out; you’ll discover the humor or the audience will discover things that they find humorous just because you’re committed and you’re playing the scene. With sketch, do you feel like you could just write a scene, and not necessarily write jokes, and still have it be funny? Or is it more deliberate, that it has to be funny?

AH: I think it deliberately has to be funny. I’ve seen some sketches from groups where it’s like there’s a character sketch and the joke to the audience is supposed to be either you know a person like this or it’s a crazy person and look at how crazy they are, and there’s not a lot of hard jokes in it, and it falls flat. I think for sketch, it has to have jokes in it and it has to be more than just—because there are a lot of funny ideas, but translating it to sketch has to have the jokes. I think I have a lot of funny ideas and premises in my head, but turning them into sketches that are actually funny is the hardest part.

LF: In improv, you might start from a real place and you can get away with that in improv, but I think in sketch you have to heighten it.  Yeah, you know somebody like this, but we want to push it to the max.

AH: Yeah, I think in improv you get away with it more, or it’s more acceptable, because you’re making it up. But in sketch, all of the things you’re supposed to be thinking of in improv, like heightening things, or “if this is true, then what else is true,” since you have the time to write that out and actually think of it and prepare, you have to do it. If you don’t necessarily do those things in an improv scene you can get away with being a funny character or working the relationship or the situation and it can be kind of stagnant and not go anywhere and still be funny, but in sketch if you try to do that it’s just…yeah.

LF: I’ve seen a lot of improv shows and been like, “oh that was interesting.” But if I’m seeing sketch I don’t want it to be interesting, I want to think, “oh that was fucking funny.”

AZ: So you can have a good improv scene that isn’t necessarily funny but with sketch it has to be funny.

LF: Ultimately I think the goal in most improv–and I’m sure there will be people who disagree with me–but you’re trying to make the audience laugh. And with sketch it’s even more of that. At least with sketch comedy–I don’t know if sketch really lends itself to tragedy.

AZ: Maybe that could be the niche you guys are looking for.

AH: It’d probably be a lot easier. And we might get more laughs, too. If we’re just being serious, deadpan…I think you just helped us develop our voice.

AZ: So without revealing too much, what kind of things can people expect from you on Wednesday?

LF: You’re going to see two charming, gee whiz, aw shucks fellas do their best, even though they’re green…

AH: Don’t sell us short, Luke!

LF: I think it’s going to be…OK…

AH: Well, what do we expect or what should other people expect? Other people will expect to see a good show from Camp Woods, and a first show from Tap City.

LF: Tap City: We’re first.

AH: Tap City: the openers.  But no, I’m excited, I like all of the sketches that we’re doing. They’re all things that we have sort of tested at Sketch Up or other open mics or things that we’ve both taken into the sketch writing classes at PHIT, but a lot of them [aren't things we've performed] with each other, which will be interesting.

LF: I’m just ready to have fun. And until that moment when we get onstage, I’m going to be tearing my hair out in agony, and self doubt, and…

AH: I’m not going to eat, between now and the show.

LF: I just ate my last piece of food, a brownie from Cosi. By the way, plug for Cosi: The brownies are great, you should get the one with cheesecake in it.

AZ: Cosi brownies: the official dessert of Luke Field from Tap City.

LF: I have a lot of official desserts.

AZ: Just send me a list, and we can run it alongside the interview.

See Tap City this Wednesday, July 25th at CAMP WOODS PLUS!, 8:30 pm at L’etage.  Tickets are $10 at the door.

Video Round-up, Vol. 6

This Week’s Spotlight: ANIMOSITY PIERRE

 

 

Hey there! I’m back with my weekly video round-up! This week I checked out the hilarious ANIMOSITY PIERRE. ANIMOSITY PIERRE is a sketch comedy duo that is one part  Matt, one part Scott, and one part Dave. I have put together three of their videos that I thought you might thoroughly enjoy or hate, but I think mostly enjoy!

 

1. THE AP EXPERIMENT: Volume 20. Dave shows Diane and Rick his new invention.

 

2. THE AP EXPERIMENT: Volume 11. Ughh, a good allergy joke is so hard to come by, but this one’s pretty hilarical.

 

3. THE AP EXPERIMENT: Volume 15. Listen to the directors give all access commentary on Volume 2! Love the commentary but still waiting on that blooper/gag reel. I mean come on guys, when they get the giggles, it’s pretty hilarious.

 

 

ComedySportz: The Blue Show

Description: Sometimes bawdy, sometimes outrageous, always funny (but never creepy) THE BLUE SHOW features your favorite players doing stuff that no Brown Bag could ever rectify. Be part of the fun as we cross the line and totally go there. Seriously guys, ComedySportz this ain’t!
Style: Improv
Date: The last Friday of every month
Time: 10PM
Admission: Tickets available online
Location: The Playground, 2030 Sansom Street
Contact: Web site

Hey Everybody!

Description: Hosted by Aaron Hertzog, Hey Everybody is a stand-up comedy showcase featuring sets from some of the best comedians in Philadelphia.

Style: Stand-up Comedy

Date: Mon, Jul 30, 2012

Time: 10:00PM – 11:00PM

Admission: Free (with 9pm show) $10 (at the door)

Location: The Shubin Theater, 407 Bainbridge St. Philadelphia

Contact: WebsiteBuy Tickets Here

The Lotto

Description: The Lotto is every PHIT Training Center student’s dream: a chance to perform on PHIT’s stage during an evening show alongside members of the PHIT House Teams. Any current student or former improv student whose last class finished in the past 12 months is eligible to put their name onto the list for the chance and selected students are notified the week before the show that they have been selected.

Style: Improv Comedy

Date: Tue, Jul 31, 2012

Time: 7:30p.m. – 8:30p.m.

Admission: $8 (advance) $10 (at the door)

Location: The Shubin Theater, 407 Bainbridge St. Philadelphia

Contact: WebsiteBuy Tickets Here

The Monthly Hour

Description: Part late-night talk show, part stand-up showcase, and mostly one giant desperate attempt to get the approval of others, “The Monthly Hour with James Hesky” brings some of Philadelphia’s top talent to the Philly Improv Theater to help you catch up on all the major (and minor) events of the month.

Style: Variety Comedy

Date: Mon, Jul 30, 2012

Time: 9:00p.m. – 10:00p.m

Admission: $8 (advance) $10 (at the door)

Location: The Shubin Theater, 407 Bainbridge St. Philadelphia

Contact: WebsiteBuy Tickets Here

Podcast Pickins with Intern Lisa

 

Okay, so you want to know what a podcast is, right?  Well, Webster’s Dictionary defines podcasts as “a program (as of music or talk) made available in digital format for automatic download over the Internet.” Luckily for you, podcasts are not as boring as that definition, no offense Webster. Comedy podcasts are kind of like these magnificent, hilarious little jewels that are guarded by the  imperial Comedian court (i.e. Jimmy Pardo, Marc Maron, Todd Glass, etc.). Yeah, I know that sounds cheesy but comedy podcasts are so much more than Webster’s simple definition. They give a personal insight into the world of comedy, everything from comedic relationships to the art of making comedy. And even if your not interested in that, some of these ridiculously funny podcasts cover everything from pop culture to snacking. Whether you love stand-up, improv, or sketch, there is something here for everyone.
So every week I’ve decided to spotlight a different podcast and list a few episodes that I think really showcase that podcast (or really just made me laugh so hard, the woman next to me on the train thinks I’m a crazy person).

The first podcast that I decided to showcase is one that is very near and dear to my heart. Hold for drum solo…It’s the Nerdist! Now I bet your wondering “Nerdist, Why Nerdist?!” First of all, why are you being so hostile, and second because without the Nerdist I would not be sitting in this chair, in the Philly Improv Theatre Office (where I am interning), writing on this awesome website. I started listening to the Nerdist about 2 years ago, and I haven’t put it down since. Chris Hardwick, the proud father of the Nerdist, hosts bi-weekly episodes that include guests such as Tina Fey, Neil DeGrasse Tyson and Conan O’Brien. Usually accompanied by Jonah Ray and Matt Mira, these episodes are at times thought provoking, fascinating, and as I like to say, “make you pee” funny.  Even their guestless episodes (which they like to call hostful) are truly amazing. I’ve learned a lot from the Nerdist such as playing D&D is cool, 8-bit music rocks, and always ENJOY YOUR BURRITO (just listen to the Rainn Wilson episode).

My top 5 Nerdist Pickins

5.  Ana Gasteyer

Although Matt and Jonah are not in this episode, Ana Gasteyer is truly delightful! Not only does she have awesome stories about working and leaving SNL and the comedic genius that is Will Ferrell but she also dives into some really interesting topics such as improv vs. stand-up and women in comedy. This episode is really fun and super insightful.

Patton is a comedic genius. Great stories about his early days doing stand-up, the Hollywood screenplay writing process, and playing D&D with fellow comedians. This episode is full of Patton rants that are sure to make you laugh your ass off.

3. Neil deGrasse Tyson

Neil is not only the Director of the Hayden Planetarium and the host of his own one-hour radio talk show StarTalk, but he is one cool dude. This episode is not only educational but the conversation is fun and makes you wonder why you didn’t become an astrophysicist (okay maybe not the last part). Also, what could be nerdier than science?

2. Kevin Smith 

I have listened to this episode  10+ times now and it still holds up. Amazing riffs that never get old, just the sound of Kevin Smith’s voice makes me laugh. All I have to say is, Vader Pussy. Enough Said.

1. HOSTFUL

A guestless episode as number 1?! YES hostile reader! The first of many hostfuls, this episode covers ridiculous and inane topics such as the career of Mark Wahlberg, Danny Elfman eating a breakfast burrito, and Matt working at a funeral home.  These episodes truly show the awesomeness of the Nerdist; just three nerdy guys riffing about whatever. However beware: these episodes will make you laugh to tears.

For more Nerdist lovin’ visit their website or youtube channel and subscribe!