Upcoming Shows

  • October 30, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 30, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • October 31, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • October 31, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • October 31, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • October 31, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 1, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Heliun
  • November 1, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • November 1, 2014 7:30 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • November 1, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • November 1, 2014 9:30 pmThe Comedy Works
  • November 1, 2014 10:00 pmComedy Sportz Philadelphia
  • November 1, 2014 10:30 pmImprov Comedy: PHIT House Teams
  • November 5, 2014 8:00 pmComedy Masters
  • November 6, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 6, 2014 9:00 pmThe Comedy Attic
  • November 7, 2014 8:00 amNationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
  • November 7, 2014 7:00 pmThe Comedy Works
  • November 7, 2014 8:00 pmThe N Crowd
  • November 7, 2014 8:00 pmCrazy Cow Comedy
  • November 7, 2014 8:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 7, 2014 9:30 pmFigment Theater: Sessions @ Studio C
  • November 8, 2014Nationally Touring Headline Comedians @ Helium
AEC v1.0.4

Philly Comedy Round-up, Vol. 23

Tonight, Rookie Card‘s monthly show at the Raven Lounge has a special Halloween theme. What does that mean? It means they will be giving out candy to those in attendance and will be giving out special prizes to audience members in costume. Joining them on the stage will be improv group Safe-Weird and stand-up Aaron Hertzog.

Chip Chantry’s One Man Show (With Special Guests) returns to the Philly Improv Theater tonight with it’s Halloween show featuring performances by: Eric Todd, Pat House, Tom Cassidy, a sketch from John Kensil, James Hesky and Mike Rainey, Story Time with Mike Rainey, The Feed with Jim Grammond and the first ever stand-up performance by Alex Dingley. Costumes are optional, but a prize will be given out for the best one.

Nominations for the 2011 Witout Awards will continue until this Friday night at 11:59 PM. Members of the Philadelphia comedy community are encouraged to make up to three nominations in each category – and to make sure they include their own name in parenthesis after their nominations. Nominees will be announced next week, with online voting taking place after that.

The Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania is starting a new political satire website FLACKcheck.org. A sister site to factcheck.org, Flack Check is designed to use the ancient art of humor to hold politicians accountable for what they say and do. More information about the project can be found online.

Auditions are being held at The Raven Lounge on Monday November 14 from 6:00 to 10:30PM for Quarter Life Crisis, a sitcom project described as “a narrative of transition and self discovery about three best friends who drop out of college during a quarter-life crisis”. Interested actors can contact deckmetellus@gmail.com to secure an audition slot.

The 2011 WitOut Awards

We here at WitOut have decided to put together a year-end awards ceremony to celebrate comedy in Philadelphia. After some debate, we have decided to leave the voting up to the comedians of our fair city to make these a purely For Us By Us effort. The process starts now with a nominations round. Performers and show promoters are encouraged to click on the following links and nominate up to three choices for each of the awards categories. Simply fill out the box with your choices and put your name in parentheses (so we can make sure people only nomiate once.) Nominations will close one week from today on Friday, Novmeber 4th, then we will announce the official nominees for each category and open up the voting for the awards. Sound good? Ok. Let the nominations process begin!

NOTE: If your name is not put in parenthesis at the end of your nominations – we will not count your nominations. We need to make sure that people are only nominating once, and this is how we are doing it. Thank you.

Best Improv Group (four or more members)
Best Improv Group (one to three members)
Best New Group  (formed in 2011 and features at least one new performer)
Best Regular Show  – Recurring monthly, weekly, or semi-regularly.
Best Show Run – Show with a short or defined run (ex: twenty-four, Meg & Rob’s Last Year, etc.)
Best One Time Show  – Either a special event (roast, competition, etc) or a specific “episode” of a recurring show ie: “The Theme Show Presents: Law and Order.”
Best Host – Best host (or co-hosts) of a regular show or open mic

Mark Leopold “Interviews” Dan Jaquette

Mark Leopold is a Philadelphia improviser, sketch comedian, employee, owner-of-a-wardrobe-full-of-plaid-shirts, and a friend. He is a member of the PHIT house team Hey Rube as well as a new addition to the cast of Comedysportz and he does sketch comedy with his group The Hold-up. When he isn’t doing one of these things he is busy doing other things, like working and laundry, and so while he sincerely wishes he was able to be a real interviewer, the best he is able to do is interview people in his head while he drives different places. Today, while going to pick up some milk, Mark took some time to sit down in a tent down at Occupy Philly in his head with Philadelphia improviser and Beirdo member Dan Jaquette.

Mark Leopold: Hey Dan, it’s me Mark!

Dan Jaquette: Hi. (extending his hand for a handshake) Dan.

ML: (shaking his hand) Mark.

This joke really only makes sense to the two of them and is based on a single incident which has colored their friendship ever since.

ML: So, you’re in Beirdo now…that’s new and therefore, something we should talk about.

DJ: I’m doing it ironically.

ML: Beirdo?

DJ: Yes. I’m a member of the group ironically. Whereas Dennis and Kevin are both genuinely interested and committed to being in an improv group based on the fact that they have beards, I actually grew a beard and joined the group as a commentary on people who would do that sort of thing.

ML: That is…elaborate.

DJ: No one has ever accused me of being less than elaborate.

ML: I’ve heard you described as circumspect.

DJ: How flattering!

ML: Do you know what it means?

DJ: Not entirely, but honestly I find it flattering that people are talking about me at all.

ML: Any press is good press?

DJ: Something like that. I feel like circumspect means something about circles, like circumference. And the “spect” part is probably a dig about my glasses.

ML: Well you do wear glasses.

DJ: I know right?

ML: (laughing) Terrible!

DJ: Just call me Mr. Imperfect Vision.

ML: (holding up his finger to call attention to an important point he wants to make) Bad eyesight is caused by the eyeball becoming deformed and throwing off the focal point of the lens in your cornea. Fact.

DJ: And there’s other reasons too…

ML: Nope. Just that reason. That is the only reason for bad eyesight.

DJ: I find myself forced to agree with you.

ML: We’ve got quite a back and forth going here Dan.

DJ: It’s Gilmore Girl-esque.

ML: You’re Gilmore Girl-esque.

DJ: Heyoo!

ML: …and you wear glasses!

DJ: You’re really on a roll now.

They laugh uproariously and smile…the best of friends.

ML: (extending hand for a handshake) Mark.

DJ: (raising eyebrows in a spot-on imitation of a person meeting Mark for the first time) Dan.

ML: Ah! So…let’s talk about you getting married.

DJ: Okay.

ML: Has that already happened?

DJ: My marriage?

ML: Yeah, are you already married or are you just engaged?

DJ: I am engaged.

ML: To…I want to say…Helen?

DJ: Ellen.

ML: Eileen?

DJ: Nope, still Ellen.

ML: Yeah, that’s just not sticking. Any chance we could get that changed?

DJ: What works for you?

ML: Hm. Brooke?

DJ: She doesn’t seem like a Brooke.

ML: Are you kidding? She’s smart and funny and pretty!

DJ: Easy…that’s my future wife there tough guy.

ML: Wow…you just don’t strike me as a the type of person who would say “tough guy.”

DJ: Are you kidding? I’m a rugged badass with a beard and a motorcycle, but who has also studied the works of Shakespeare at a graduate level.

ML: Hm, well I guess that settles it. Best of luck with…dammit…Elton?

DJ: Not a first name.

ML: Maureen?

DJ: Someone else entirely.

ML: …well…I mean…I’m assuming most of these other names belong to other people entirely…

DJ: Not Erolton.

ML: No one’s gotten to that name yet?

DJ: Not yet. It’s fresh off the name-assembly line.

ML: It’s not terrible.

DJ: Well don’t get any ideas, we’re planning on naming our first child Erolton.

ML: We?

DJ: Yeah, me and…oh man…dammit.

More laughter. More friendship.

ML: (extending hand for a handshake, but unsure.) Dan?

DJ: (thinks for a moment, then points like he’s ninety percent sure) Mark.

Halloween Shows!

The end of October is traditionally a special time for themed comedy shows. The Halloween season brings out special characters, theme shows, and other spooky surprises. Here is a run down of some of the special Halloween shows Philly has to offer in the upcoming week.

Hey Everybody – Friday, October 28 – 7PM – Philly Improv Theater

Aaron Hertzog‘s stand-up comedy showcase features all characters this week with comedy from Fastball Pitcher Bob Gutierrez, Bing Supernova, Joan Fisky, “Dad”, and more!

The Theme Show Presents: The Twilight Zone – Friday, October 28 – 10PM – Philly Improv Theater

Rob Baniewicz‘s monthly variety show pays tribute to the strange, freaky world of The Twilight Zone. Will sketches end in ironic twists? You’ll have to attend to see.

The Gross (Hallowiener) Show – Friday, October 28 – 11PM – Philly Improv Theater

Word on the street is that Alex Gross has been busy preparing buckets of (hopefully) fake blood for his trash talk show, and the Facebook event promises “pure fucking evil, more pure fucking evil” and “even more pure fucking evil.” Sounds like fun.

PHIT House Team Night of the Living Dead Improv – Saturday, October 29 – 7, 8:30, 10PM – Philly Improv Theater

PHIT House Teams Asteroid!, King Friday, and Fletcher along with special “Undead Guests” will perform special Halloween themed improv. Asteroid! plans on performing an improvised B Movie. The special guests on each show will be now defunct house teams reanimated for a special performance.

Hatespeech Committee Mischief Night Variety Show Nonsense Costume Party! – Sunday, October 30 – 7:00PM – Connie’s Ric Rac

Chip Chantry and Roger C. Snair the Vampire will co-host the evening while Otto Van Walmart serves as the house band. Costumes are manditory for all that attend, and ones will be available to rent at the door for $3 for those that don’t believe that’s true. There will be a prize given out for best costume and best Roger C. Snair impersonation. Plus Hatespeech Committee promises that they will be getting wild.

Chip Chantry’s One Man Show (With Special Guests) – Monday, October 31 – 8:30PM – Philly Improv Theater

Chip Chantry’s monthly spectacular has the distinct privilege of falling on Halloween night and will feature a sketch from James Hesky, Eric Todd, John Kensil and Mike Rainey along with performances from Pat House and Tom Cassidy, favorite recurring feature Storytime with Mike Rainey and movie reviews from the Westboro Baptist Church.

Weekend Comedy Guide

It’s a busy weekend for comedy here in Philly. Here’s a handy guide to all that’s going on around our fair city.

Helium Comedy Club – Anjelah Johnson – Friday and Saturday, 8:00, 10:30

Johnson, known for her viral video Nail Salon, and her time as a cast member on MadTV takes the stage at Helium with her stand-up act full of characters, stories, and high energy material centering on her family and life growing up and living in Southern California. Nate Bargatze (Conan, Comedy Central) is the feature act and Aaron Hertzog is the host.

Philly Improv Theater – Friday

7:00 – Hey Everybody – Aaron Hertzog’s showcase will be without it’s usual host this week as he is at Helium – filling in will be Christian Alsis of The Feeko Brothers. This week’s show will feature comedy from Philly’s Phunniest winner Tommy Pope as well as Pete Kuempel, Ed McGonigal, and Ryan Shaner.

8:30 – The Feeko Brothers and Angel Yau – Fresh off their second consecutive Dirtiest Sketch in Philadelphia title, Christian Alsis and Billy Bob Thompson take the stage with a mostly new show they premiered last week at Philly Sketch Fest. Joining them at PHIT will be New York sketch comedian Angel Yau.

10:00 – The Kristen and Amie Show with Nielsen –  The improv duo comprised of Kristen Shier and Amie Roe bring their high energy, crazy character, fun filled playing to the stage at PHIT along with fun to watch indie group Nielsen.

Philly Improv Theater – Saturday

7:00 – Brick with Ebony and Ivory – New York’s Magnet Theater House Team Brick comes to Philly to perform along side the duo comprised of Iron Lung members Corin Wells and Maureen Costello.

8:30 – House Team Night, King Friday and Mayor Karen – Two of PHIT’s own house teams perform.

10:00 – House Team Night, Asteroid and ZaoGao – Two more PHIT house teams perform.

11:00 – Late Night Improv Jam – Improv open stage hosted by PHIT house team Fletcher.

The Laff House – Ted Carpenter – Friday (8:30, 10:45) Saturday (8:00, 10:00, 12:00)

 The veteran of Showtime at the Apollo and Russel Simmon’s Def Comedy Jam performs at The Laff House on South St.

City Spotlight – Friday

8:00 – Broad Comedy – The all women comedy show kicks off the night of laughs at the Philly Shakespeare Theater. Featuring performances by Mary Radzinski, Carolyn Busa, Hillary Rae, Sarah Morawcynski, Erin Mulville, and more.

10:00 – Bing Supernova’s Cavalcade of Fools – Everyone in the world’s favorite comedian hosts a show packed with performances by  Roger Weaver, John Kensil, The Lucas Brothers, The Feeko Brothers, Jaykob Strange, and Alex Dingley.

City Spotlight – Saturday

CIF National College Improv Tournament – Mid Atlantic Division Regional – All day long college improv teams compete for a chance to represent Pennsylvania in the National College Improv Tournament in Chicago.

 

Interview with Mary Radzinski, host of “Broad Comedy”

Friday night will be a celebration of women in comedy in Philadelphia. Broad Comedy is the City Spotlight‘s showcase of stand-up, sketch, improv and storytelling from some of Philly’s funniest females. We caught up with Mary Radzinski to ask her about the show, her comedy, and attitudes about women in comedy.

First off, Women doing Comedy, what is up with that? I know.  It’s like, I’m hungry.  Quit horsing around and make me a sandwich.

Obviously, my first question is a joke…what are your feelings about those kinds of attitudes that look at “female comedy” as a thing unto itself. I think it’s a limited view by limited people, but I sort of understand it.  Comedy, like many things, has been male dominated.  It’s a numbers game. As more and more women are becoming comedians, bringing hilarity to audiences of both men and women, hopefully “female comedian” will eventually become “comedian”.

Do you plan on introducing every act with a wink and a “this next performer’s a lady” line or any special variation on that time honored tradition – or would answering that be giving too much away. I’m actually not hosting the show, so it won’t really be up to me, but I assume there will be some poking fun at that.  The introductions of female comics is of great amusement to me.  I was introduced once as, “having a vagina”.  As this is factually correct, I couldn’t argue with the host, however, I would have been more impressed if he had used “labia minora”.  It’s annoying to me that this is how some comics get laughs and perpetuate a stereotype.  Be smarter.  Aim higher.  Talk about our tits.

How do you feel about articles like this one from Fox News that say things like this – “For women, frump isn’t funny any longer. The new female comedian has to be the sexual aggressor, sexually provocative, dominant and successful…” and “Rosie O’Donnell and Janeane Garofalo will be relegated to playing the female versions of Chris Farley. Hollywood doesn’t want a woman that is not sexually enticing like Rosie; it wants the sexual alpha female…” Whatevs.  Frump will always be funny.  Frump is typically what nurtures the development of funny.  Hollywood will always have it’s eye on sexy; sex sells. Writing funny scripts for pretty actors will never get old.  I recently saw Jennifer Anniston on Inside the Actor’s Studio.  During the interview she had the personality of an elderly chimp.  Referencing Anna Faris as a  face of female comedy is a jab at the more than likely frumpy person who wrote her most recent comedic script.  There are no absolutes.  Would it help your career to be beautiful, sexy, and hilarious?  Of course.  Necessary?  Nah.

Where does your personal style as a comedian come from? I really try to be myself on stage.  I’m not a very high energy person offstage, and this translates. I’m not entirely deadpan in my everyday life either, so I’ve been working on that as well.  This has, and continues to be, my biggest challenge.

Your show is going to be a mix of styles of comedy, it’s going to have some stand-up, improv, sketch, and storytelling – traditionally these have been kept apart – do you see a growing trend in bringing them all together on one bill? I’m not sure I see a growing trend in doing this, but we wanted to represent different areas of Philly’s comedy scene. We were given the title, “Broad Comedy” as part of Sketchfest, so we thought we’d incorporate a “broad spectrum” idea into it to, through different types of comedy.  I do think the variety jazzes it up for the audience.

Has running your own weekly open mic and booking shows given you any new insights or perspectives on comedy? Do you have any words of advice for someone looking to start their own show? It has definitely been insightful regarding the amount of work that goes into even an open mic.  It’s not easy to please everyone but it’s a goal to keep trying.  Words of advice: Get on stage every week and do time.  Host to a room of a hundred (even if there are 5 people and they are all comics).  Have fun and act like it.

You’re somewhat of a Twitter aficionado – do your best job of summing up and promoting Broad Comedy in 140 characters or less. Broad Comedy.Friday,October 21st. Shakespeare Theater. 8pm.Broads doing comedy. Broadly. Like their broad mothers taught them. Come watch.

Broad Comedy is part of the first annual City Spotlight at the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theater (2111 Sansom St.) Friday night at 8:00PM. Tickets can be purchased online.

Mark Leopold “Interviews” Jason Stockdale

Mark Leopold is a Philadelphia improviser, sketch comedian, employee, an uncomfortable-complimenter-when-the-other-person-has-complimented-him-first-because-it-feels-like-the-only-reason-he’s-complimenting-them-is-to-make-them-even-no-matter-how-sincere-his-compliment-may-or-may-not-be, and a friend. He is a member of the PHIT house team Hey Rube as well as a new addition to the cast of Comedysportz and he does sketch comedy with his group The Hold-up. When he isn’t doing one of these things he is busy doing other things, like working and laundry, and so while he sincerely wishes he was able to be a real interviewer, the best he is able to do is interview people in his head while he drives different places. Today, while on his way to work, Mark took some time to sit down in an interrogation room in his head with Philadelphia improviser and Comedysportz teammate/teacher Jason Stockdale.

MARK LEOPOLD: Hey Jason, it’s me Mark!

JASON STOCKDALE: Hey man!

ML: Good times! Stockdale!

JS: Alright!

ML: Okay, shut up, let’s do this. Greatest fear?

JS: Dogs.

ML: Greatest strength?

JS: Left shoulder.

ML: Best way to get into your apartment without a key?

JS: You go through the large window in my bedroom. It doesn’t latch and there’s no way to lock it.

ML: Good.

JS: Full disclosure, there is a pit full of spikes directly inside and below the window.

ML: Home Alone style.

JS: That would have been a very different movie if Kevin had ended up killing the burglars with his first couples of traps.

ML: I’d like to see that movie. It probably just becomes a courtroom drama.

JS: And the creepy neighbor testifies against him.

ML: That neighbor…man. It sucks that he got a bad rap just for carrying a snow shovel around…in winter…after it had recently snowed.

JS: But he also had a beard, and he squinted quite a bit.

ML: Now who’s testifying against who? Who? Whom?

JS: Whom.

ML: Whom?

JS: Yep.

ML: I thought whom had something to do with having a direct object.

JS: Yep, but we should move on. I’m sure your readers aren’t that interested in the finer points of grammar.

ML: Ouch. I’ll have you know that I cater to a very high-end readership.

JS: Even so, this is pretty dry stuff. They can just buy a grammar book.

ML: Favorite grammar book?

JS: Strunk and White, okay moving on!

ML: Favorite chapter of Strunk and White?

JS: Chapter 13: Colons and Semicolons. Okay! So…Mark, what do you like most about Philadelphia?

ML: It’s proximity to my house.

JS: You’re being a real asshole.

ML: It was a joke Jason. This whole thing is a joke.

JS: Don’t do that. Don’t write it to make me seem like the jerk here.

ML: Jason, just calm down. Be reasonable.

JS: (standing up and overturning the table) I’ll be as unreasonable as I want damn it!

ML: (hands out, placating) Jason…easy.

JS: (…and here comes Jason’s famous switchblade) Shut up!

ML: Jason come on…put down the knife.

JS: (grabbing Brooks and putting the knife to his throat) No!

ML: Jason. Jason. Look at his neck Jason. Look at his neck. He’s bleeding Jason.

JS: (breaking down into tears and dropping the knife) I’m…I’m sorry…I just…

ML: I understand.

JS: I can’t go back.

ML: I know.

JS: I’m sorry.

ML: (turning to Brooks) Brooks, get out of here. (…but Brooks is already gone) Brooks?

JS: (sniffing) Brooks?

ML: Brooks!?

Mark and Jason look at each other with unspoken realization. The camera slowly pans up to the wooden beam overhead where there is an inscription carved into the wood. The inscription reads, “Brooks was here…but got really bored when they started talking about grammar.”

Interview with Pat House, Host of In the Beginning…

“The way to improve is to reject everything you’re doing. You have to create a void by destroying everything; you have to kill it. Or else you’ll tell the same fucking jokes every night.” – Louis CK

The path of a comedian is one of growth and change. We are constantly trying to write new  jokes, work on new material, and develop fresh ideas. All in the hopes of getting better. We are constantly looking ahead, to what is next. What is the next step in our careers? What is the next goal we want to achieve? Where do we go from here? This Wednesday, at the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theater as part of Comedy Month’s City Spotlight, a group of Philadelphia comedians will do just the opposite, they will look back.

In the Beginning…is a show from the mind of comedian Pat House which will showcase comedians taking a look at video footage from an early point in their careers, and roasting their former selves on their comedic talents (or lack thereof.) It is a show that aims to celebrate the growth and development of Philly comics in a way most comedians are comfortable with…by making fun of themselves. We had some questions for House on his own growth as a comedian, and what he sees in his peers.

Why are you making comedians relive their painful sets of years’ past? Because comedy isn’t tortuous enough. Just kidding!! I’m fascinated by the process of stand-up comedy. Nobody starts out great, and the evolution comedians has always interested me. I think it’ll be fun to laugh at how new and inexperienced we were, and it’ll be great to relive some of those gems we all had when we first started.

Tell us about the first time you thought you were getting good as a comedian. Though there are plenty of things in my comedy that really need improvement, I guess I first thought I was on the right track between a year and two years in, when I started getting hosting spots and guest sets on the weekends.

How much have you grown and changed since? What would you say to yourself then? Great question. For starters, I would love to ask myself “So, you think you’re being discrete by taping a setlist to your water bottle and looking at it between every joke? Because you’re not.”

For me, growth as a comedian seems to be long plateau periods and every once in a while I will hit a bit of an upswing – how do you see patterns in your growth? I would definitely agree with that. Plateaus are very common, but the longer I do comedy, the more I realized how beneficial the plateaus are. When you’re doing the same jokes night after night, it’s redundant and sometimes boring, but looking back, you realize those jokes got tighter and better. You don’t always realize that on a day-to-day evaluation.

I see patterns in my growth every year. I used to judge myself on what seemed like a daily basis and I’ve learned that I absolutely cannot do that. The everyday grind is rough, but if I gauge myself every six months to a year, that’s where I see the most improvement.

How do you think that compares to other comedians? Every comedian plateaus, but every comic gauges their comedy in their own way. A lot of newer comics tend to be in the moment and think they’re either good or that they suck right off the bat. The more you hang around comedy, the more you realize it’s about the bigger picture. I just hit my seventh anniverary in comedy last week, and I can definitely say that I’ve learned more between years five and seven than I did my first five.

What is your favorite thing about watching different comedians evolve and grow? My favorite thing about watching other comics grow is that in itself (does that even make sense?) I can name dozens of great comics I’ve known since the beginning of their career, and watching them evolve to where they are now has been one of the best parts of the ride. We’re all in this mess together.

Do you have any specific favorite moments of seeing a comedian “find their voice”? Just the other day I watched the 1995 HBO Young Comedian’s Special with Louis CK and Dave Attell. They were great, professional comics at the time, but sixteen years later, both of them are (obviously) significantly better and have a solid grip on their voice.

It was really interesting to me – with Attell, a lot of the jokes he does in the HBO special, he did on his first album six years later, and the jokes are light-years better on the album. He honed those jokes for years. With Louie, it was almost like you could see where he was going with his voice, it was there, it just hadn’t come out yet.

Attell and CK are two of my all-time favorite comics, and seeing that special made me feel a lot better about my material. They were great then, and incredible now.

Have you seen any dramatic changes in someone’s style, either suddenly or over time? What have you liked or disliked about them? I really can’t recall any dramatic changes in someone’s act. I feel with a lot of my friends, any changes over time were just the natural progression of becoming a better comic.

How do you think your style has changed since you started? My style has changed immensely since I started; I am a completely different comedian. When I first started, I had a lot of shock value one-liners; terrible, fictitious jokes that were God-awful. Back then, the thought of being personal on stage didn’t even occur to me. About two years or so in, I started to get a little personal with jokes about my life at the time (college and drinking), and from there, it progressed slowly into what I do now, which is becoming a mostly personal act.

Do you have any plans or goals as far as changing your style or writing habits for the future? My main goal for the future is to write more. I tell myself to everyday, but I’ll be the first to admit that I’m pretty lazy with that. Reading helps me a lot too. I find that when I’m going through book after book, I’m writing a lot more, and I seem to notice more things around me as well.

In the Beginning…will play at the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theater (2111 Sansom St.) this Wednesday, October 19th at 8:00PM. Tickets can purchased online.

Philly Comedy Round-up, Vol. 22

This week, Comedy Month wraps up with the first annual City Spotlight, a week showcasing many of Philadelphia’s diverse comedic talents. Tonight, the Old Comedy Buffet features all comedians over 40 for a night of classic Philadelphia comedy. Later this week, Pat House hosts In The Beginning…, where comedians will show a video from their early days of comedy and roast themselves making fun of how far they’ve (hopefully) come. Friday night features Broad Comedy, an all female show hosted by Mary Radzinski and Carolyn Busa.

This Tuesday, Face Time with Chip Chantry returns to Helium Comedy Club. This month’s show will feature James Hesky, Brendan Kennedy, Darryl Charles, Glen Tickle, and as always will feature co-host and house band Amir Gollan and Chip Chantry doing the news.

Philly Improv Theater will feature a week of shows they are calling “Pilot Week” which will showcase all new shows looking for a permanent spot in the PHIT lineup. Tonight, Becca Trabin presents Town Hall a debate show in a mock town hall meeting format. Tuesday will feature True? The Roger C. Snair Interview Show hosted by Brendan Kennedy‘s Guilty Pleasures sidekick. Wednesday will be the debut of a new panel comedy show A Few Answers Short.

This Thursday and Friday The Feeko Brothers will present a new show at Philly Improv Theater. Billy and Christian, fresh off their second consecutive Dirtiest Sketch in Philadelphia victory will share the stage with New York sketch group Skinny Bitch Jesus Meeting. Tickets can be purchased in advance online.

The N Crowd

Description: The N Crowd wants you to share a laugh at the Actors Center. They perform improv entirely dependent on suggestions provided by the audience. When you come, you’re expected to have a slew of things to yell out when asked for suggestions. You can purchase tickets in cash at the door or online with a major credit card. Doors open at 7:30 pm. RSVP’s are held until 7:50 pm.
Style: Improv
Host: The N Crowd
Date: Reoccuring, every Friday
Time: 8:00PM – 10:00PM
Admission: $10 in advance, $15 at door
Location: The Actors Center – 257 N. 3rd St., Philadelphia, PA
Contact: Website